Clinical Neuroscience

[SUCCESSFULL SURGICAL REMOVAL OF A MESENCEPHALIC CAVERNOUS ANGIOMA, WHICH WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR PROGRESSIVE NEUROLOGICAL DEFICITS]

ZSOLDOS Tamás, MOLNÁR Anna, JÁNOSSY Ágota, KUNCZ Ádám, NAGY Ernő, DEÁK Gábor, BARZÓ Pál

JULY 30, 2008

Clinical Neuroscience - 2008;61(07-08)

[Cavernous angiomas comprise 5-10% of all vascular malformations in the central nervous system, occuring most frequently in the supratentorial region, and 20% of them in the brain stem. According to literature, brain stem cavernous angiomas occur most frequently in the pons (60%), and equally in the mesencephalon (20%) and in medulla oblongata. In clinical evaluation the authors describe the successful removal of a mesencephalic cavernous angioma causing progressive neurological deficits and symptoms. The authors present a case of a 51 year old female, who had developed 1 year prior to her admittance: fatigue, weakness in the right upper limb and fingers, right lower limb ataxia. One month later, her lower right limb developed sensory deficits. The first neurological exploration indicated dysarthria, moderate facial and right hemiparesis, hemihypaesthesia and ataxia. CT and MR imaging indicated multilobulated cavernomas in the mesencephalon. After conservative treatment the patient became almost symptom free, and thus neurosurgical treatment was not discussed. Later on her symptoms fluctuated, but after 6 month she suddenly developed progressive right hemiparesis, right facial weakness, serious dysphasia, and emotional incontinence combined with continuous spastic sobbings. The controll MRI showed enlargement of the cavernomas and new extravasation. Surgery was indicated for removing the cavernomas. The left infratentorial, supracerebellar approach revealed a blood engorged cavernoma in the center of the mesencephalon, almost dividing it. The cavernomas and accompanying haematoma was exstirpated. The patient's neurological symptoms rapidly improved after surgery, her dysphasia as well as motor weakness have disappeared. Six days after surgery, we discharged a neurologically symptomless and self-supporting patient. The literature and the presented case indicates that the correct timing and proper surgery allows brain stem cavernomas to be safely removed, or significantly bated, which results in the massive regression of neurological symptoms.]

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