Lege Artis Medicinae

[Advances in sleep diagnostics]

HORVÁTH Róbert

JANUARY 20, 2003

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2003;13(01)

[Despite the insufficient financial support, the number of the laboratories for sleep diagnostics and the examined patients are rising. The CPAP (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure) equipment playing the main role in the treatment of the obstructive sleep apnoe syndrome (OSAS) is recently available from three neurological centres (Budapest, Debrecen, Pécs). These centres can prescribe the machine as a ”model experiment” with 85% support given by the State Health Care. The increase of the number of the licensed hospitals is expected in the near future, the only condition is the polysomnography background. Differential diagnostics (narcolepsy, RLS, PLMS, sleepdependent laryngospasm, disorders of the circadian rhythm) and the follow-up of the CPAP using patients (indication, contraindication, compliance, CPAP pressure setting, CPAP therapy control) have been emphasized.]

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