Lege Artis Medicinae

[A prosthetic valve thrombosis causing coronary occlusion]

VARGA Ádám, VÁGÓ Tibor, NAGY András, CSERNI Gábor

MAY 20, 2010

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2010;20(05)

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