LAM KID

[The effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on articular cartilage]

GÁTI Tamás, JUHÁSZ István, ROJKOVICH Bernadette

SEPTEMBER 20, 2012

LAM KID - 2012;2(03)

[In developed countries, the treatment of osteoarthritis costs up to 1-2% of the GNP. The poor hygroscopy of hyaline cartilage and of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) molecules that are components of proteoglycans plays a key role in the development of the disease. Age-related osteoarthritis mostly affects the weight-bearing joints of the lower extremities, the hips and knees, and - more frequently than the former ones - the small joints of the hands, causing chronic pain and disability. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) used for the treatment of osteoarthritis-related pain influence not only pain but also cartilage metabolism, and - among others - GAG molecules. NSAIDs diminish the biosynthesis of prostaglandins (PG) that have a role in inflammatory processes, and influence oxygen free radicals, the levels of interleukins (ILs) and the function of metalloproteinases. The ideal NSAID for the joints stimulates cartilage formation, reduces cartilage resorption, and the level of katabolic cytokines. Aceclofenac was found to have the most beneficial effect on multiple aspects of cartilage metabolism.]

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

LAM KID

[Efficiency of osteoporosis treatment in Hungary - An analysis of the Hungarian National Insurance Company’s data]

LAKATOS Péter, TÓTH Emese, SZEKERES László, POÓR Gyula, HÉJJ Gábor, TAKÁCS István

[The treatment of osteoporosis and its consequences place a significant burden on the health care of developed countries. Modern therapeutical approaches are able to efficiently decrease the risk of osteoporotic bone fractures. However, we do not know whether the interventions introduced in the past 15 years have significantly reduced the number of osteoporotic fractures in real life, and if they have, how cost-effective this effect was. To answer these questions, we have analysed data of the Hungarian National Insurance Company collected between 2004-2010. During these 7 years, the number of bone fractures among patients treated for osteoporosis continuously decreased. This was also observed in the incidence of hip fractures. Interestingly, the mortality of osteoporotic patients was significantly lower than that of the same age group in the average population. Besides the efficient treatment of osteoporosis, this finding is also due to the outstanding general care provided by the specialised osteoporosis centers of the country. As a consequence of the reduction in fractures, 3.4 billion HUF was saved per year by the insurance company, which is approximately equal to the 3.5 billion HUF spent on the reimbursement of medicines used for the treatment of osteoporosis, which means that the investments show a return. The calculation of the quality- adjusted life years, which is the internationally accepted method of the WHO for the study of cost-effectiveness, shows that the above results were achieved in a remarkably cost-efficient way. At the same time, it is noteworthy and calls for caution that the decrease in reimbursement by the insurance company in 2007 resulted in a 51% drop in the number of patients receiving treatment, which radically reduced the observed efficiency.]

LAM KID

[Estimating the risk of new fracture - Which factors confer an increased fracture risk?]

TAKÁCS István

[This risk of osteoporosis-related fractures is influenced by a number of well-known risk factors. Among the approaches to quantify bone fracture risk, the FRAX questionnaire is the most widespread in everyday practice. However, this method only provides a probability percentage for the physician, and it is unable to specify or weigh the factors that may have a particular importance in evaluating individual fracture risk, or choosing the appropriate therapy in patients with previous osteoporotic fracture. This summary aims to provide practical help for the evaluation of individual fracture risk in patients who have had bone fractures.]

LAM KID

[Association between osteoporosis and nutrition during the history of human evolution]

KISS Zoltán, KISS István, JÓZSA László

[From the Palaeolithic age to the twentieth century, nutritional habits as well as the quality and composition of nutritients changed dramatically. The protein-based calorie intake of former Homo species had been replaced by a carbohydrate-based nutrition since the Neolithic revolution (the transition to agriculture). The start of food production also changed the range of nutrients and the start of sedentary lifestyle. At the same time, approximately five thousand years ago osteoporosis appeared. In this paper, the authors give a short review of eating habits and foods of early Homo species in the Palaeolithic Age and of Homo sapiens in Neolithic Age, Antiquity, Middle Ages and Modern Age, and discuss the possible relationship of nutrition and osteoporosis.]

LAM KID

[Vitamin D deficiency and infections]

LUDWIG Endre, KRIVÁN Gergely

[Studies performed in the past few years have confirmed that vitamin D is essential for maintaining the optimal immune defense, and its immunomodulatory effect has a role in the defense against infections as well. A lot of data suggest that low serum 25-(OH)-D concentration is associated with an increased frequency of certain infections and it adversely influences pathological processes. Data on this adverse effect are available mostly in case of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, respiratory viral infections in general, HIV, hepatitis C and sepsis. The outcomes of severe infections are usually influenced by a number of factors and it seems that vitamin D deficiency is one of those factors that shift the process towards an unfavourable outcome. Further studies should evaluate the significance of this role and the influence of vitamin D supplementation on pathological processes.]

LAM KID

[Why twins are different? - About twin research]

ERDŐS Edina, BÁLINT Bálint László

[Twin studies had an important role in the development of medicine. In this review, we present the available data of Hungarian twin studies and the number of twins in Hungary on the basis of statistical data. Comparing these data with international ones and taking into account probable prevalences, we aim to provide an estimation of the number of twins in Hungary who have cancerous diseases. Our estimation suggests that creation of a national database for such twins is feasible and could provide a great help for a better understanding of the causes and mechanisms of cancerous diseases.]

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Lege Artis Medicinae

[The risk of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs]

FARSANG Csaba

[During the past ten years, a number of original publications, reviews and metaanalyses were published on the cardiovascular (CV) safety of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). These data were summarised in several previous publications. As this group of medicines is very frequently used and many of them are available over the counter (OTC), their risks require particular attention. Recently, new analyses have been published on previously discussed preparations as well as on new drugs that had been omitted from previous analyses (paracetamol, aceclofenac), thus, it is important to review these data and draw attention again to differences in side effects among NSAIDs.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[A new perspective on the extrarenal regulation of sodium and water balance]

AGÓCS Róbert István, SUGÁR Dániel, SULYOK Endre, SZABÓ J. Attila

[The regulation of the homeostasis of sodium and water is one of the oldest fields in medical research. Our article exhibits a new aspect of sodium balance: the concept of the regulated sodium storage taking place in the interstitium of the skin. We summarize the history of the research carried out in this area, beginning with the discovery of osmotically inactive sodium reservoirs to the localization of these buffers and the elucidation of the role of a regulating cutaneous cascade, which has an effect on blood pressure. Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) macromolecules present in the skin interstitium, come into reversible contact with the excess of dietary sodium intake. Thus in addition to the known role of the kidney, the above system may contribute to the regulation of sodium- and water balance and thereby to the regulation of blood pressure.]

LAM Extra for General Practicioners

[THE RISK OF NONSTEROIDAL ANTIINFLAMMATORY DRUGS]

FARSANG Csaba

[During the past ten years, a number of original publications, reviews and metaanalyses were published on the cardiovascular (CV) safety of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). These data were summarised in several previous publications. As this group of medicines is very frequently used and many of them are available over the counter (OTC), their risks require particular attention. Recently, new analyses have been published on previously discussed preparations as well as on new drugs that had been omitted from previous analyses (paracetamol, aceclofenac), thus, it is important to review these data and draw attention again to differences in side effects among NSAIDs.]