LAM KID

[Our predecessors were right - Closing remarks on the solubility of urate crystals in microscopic specimens]

BÉLY Miklós, KRUTSAY Miklós

DECEMBER 20, 2013

LAM KID - 2013;3(04)

[The authors studied the solubility of urate crystals in alcohol, in an 8% aqueous solution of formaldehyde and in acetone, respectively. The urate crystals were least soluble in alcohol. In comparison, the amount of urate crystals decreased in the aqueous solution of formaldehyde, which confirmed the suggestion of our predecessors that tissues suspected to contain urate crystals should be fixed in alcohol. Urate crystals dissolved in greatest amounts in acetone. Acetone is widely used by histological laboratories for dehydration of tissue blocks before embedding them in paraffin, which, in case of fixation in aqueous formaldehyde, contributes to the dissolution of urate crystals. In our earlier studies, we found that dissolution of urate crystals from haematoxylineosin stained sections is caused by the staining of nuclei in haematoxylin, therefore urate crystals are preferably demonstrated in unstained tissue sections.]

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LAM KID

[Femoral neck fractures treated with DHLS screws - early results]

KOCSIS András, KÁDAS István, KÁDAS Dániel, HANGODY László

[In Hungary, the treatment approach for medial femoral neck fractures depends on the type of fracture and the overall condition of the patient. An obvious goal is to minimise the most common complications of the applied method, namely avascular necrosis of the head and redisplacement, while maintaining a low-risk and minimally invasive technique. Following the surgical method most commonly used in our country, we combined the double cannullated screws technique with the compressing HeadLess Screw System. This way we succeeded to achieve intraoperative compression, which provides intensified stability while retaining the principles of minimally invasive techniques.]

LAM KID

[Quality of life of patients with osteoporosis in Hungary]

VOKÓ Zoltán, INOTAI András, HORVÁTH CSABA, BORS Katalin, SPEER Gábor, KALÓ Zoltán

[AIM - The aim of our study was to estimate the loss of quality of life due to osteoporotic fractures. We performed a cross-sectional study including 840 patients in 21 centers that specialise in the care of patients with osteoporosis and in acute care of fractures. METHODS - Patients were selected randomly and stratified for the location of and time elapsed since the fracture. Quality of life (QoL) was assessed by the Qualeffo-41 and the EuroQol-5D questionnaires. RESULTS - Patients with morphometric fractures of more than one vertebra had the lowest median EQ-5D index value (0.59). Symptomatic vertebral, hip and arm fractures also considerably decreased QoL. Patients with morphometric fractures of more than one vertebra had the lowest total Qualeffo-41 score. When controlled for age and gender, patients with hip fracture or morphometric vertebral fracture had at least 0.2 less mean utility values than had osteoporotic patients without history of fracture. Patients with more than a oneyear history of hip fracture had QoL scores as low as had patients with an acute fracture. In case of wrist and arm fractures, the acute loss of QoL somewhat decreased with time. CONCLUSION - In conclusion, osteoporotic fractures, especially hip and vertebral fractures result in a significant loss of patients’ quality of life. Our results show that physicians need to pay a close attention to morphometric vertebral fractures, which contribute to a great loss of human capital.]

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[Head and neck injury risks in heavy metal: head bangers stuck between rock and a hard bass]

BALLA Bernadett

LAM KID

[Once again on adherence - Is it just fashionable or indeed a timely issue?]

VALKUSZ Zsuzsanna

[Nonadherence to pharmacological treat-ment in osteoporosis is a well-recognised problem not only in Hungary but all over the world. As in other chronic diseases, adherence to osteoporosis treatment is poor, which results in serious problems affecting patients as well as health care resources. Low adherence rates consistent-ly result in increased rates of fractures. Some approaches aimed to improve com-plience and persistence, such as extension of dosing intervals, might improve patients’ adherence to therapy. International clinical studies have demonstrated that the number of fractures cannot be reduced without suf-ficient adherence. Improving patient edu-cation, enhancing interactions between health care providers and patients, taking into account patients’ preferences and involving them in treatment decisions may all improve adherence.]

LAM KID

[MicroRNAs as a new family of hormones]

BOJCSUK Dóra, SIPOS Lilla, BÁLINT Bálint László

[MicroRNA molecules regulate the translation of mRNAs to proteins. In a study published by Maria A. Cortez and her colleagues in Nature in 2011, the authors suggest that miRNAs, known as biomarkers and translation regulators, could be considered as nucleic acid hormones. In this paper we introduce the characteristics of microRNAs that support their function as hormones.]

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[In our previous study we refuted the thesis that sodium urate crystals are not, or only rarely detectable in formalin-fixed histological samples because they dissolve in the aqueous formalin solution. Our observations indicate that dissolution of urate crystals is primarily caused by haematoxylineosin staining. Undeniably, however, urate crystals are partially dissolved in the aqueous solution of formaldehyde, and thus a small amount of urate deposits may totally dissolve from tissue samples. The aim of the present study was to identify those steps of the staining procedure that are responsible for the dissolution of urate crystals. We found that the dissolution of urate crystals during the course of staining was caused by the combined effects of haematoxylin staining, treatment with 1% aqueous lithium carbonate solution and dehydration with acetone. As the simplest histological method for the detection of urate crystals, we recommend examining unstained sections (mounted with Canada balsam) of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples in polarised light. According to our previous study, about two thirds of urate crystals remain detectable on unstaied sections, whereas haematoxylin-eosin stained sections of the same tissue samples (derived from patients with gout) did not contain urate crystals. In the samples where urate crystals could be detected in haematoxylin- eosin stained sections using polarised light, the unstained sections contained much more crystals, which shows that dissolution is greatly decreased on unstained sections.]

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[A dogma of histochemistry that seems to be refuted - histological detectability of urate crystals]

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[In medical practice there are a number of “truths etched in stone” that are passed on from textbook to textbook and learned by generations before they become obsolete. This short study aims to eliminate a misbelief from the diagnosis of gout that is related to the histological detectability of urate deposits. According to the generally accepted thesis, urate crystals obtained from patients with gout are dissolved in formalin solution, therefore, tissue samples should be fixated in alcohol. The authors have found that urate crystals can be detected on conventionally mounted, native (unstained) sections, despite formalin fixation, whereas the great majority of urate crystals are dissolved during haematoxylin-eosin staining. Therefore, for the detection of urate crystals the tissue samples should be examined on native, unstained sections.]

LAM KID

[A simple method to detect urate crystals in formalin-fixed tissue]

BÉLY Miklós, KRUTSAY Miklós

[In our previous study we refuted the thesis that sodium urate crystals are not, or only rarely detectable in formalin-fixed histological samples because they dissolve in the aqueous formalin solution. Our observations indicate that dissolution of urate crystals is primarily caused by haematoxylineosin staining. Undeniably, however, urate crystals are partially dissolved in the aqueous solution of formaldehyde, and thus a small amount of urate deposits may totally dissolve from tissue samples. The aim of the present study was to identify those steps of the staining procedure that are responsible for the dissolution of urate crystals. We found that the dissolution of urate crystals during the course of staining was caused by the combined effects of haematoxylin staining, treatment with 1% aqueous lithium carbonate solution and dehydration with acetone. As the simplest histological method for the detection of urate crystals, we recommend examining unstained sections (mounted with Canada balsam) of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples in polarised light. According to our previous study, about two thirds of urate crystals remain detectable on unstaied sections, whereas haematoxylin-eosin stained sections of the same tissue samples (derived from patients with gout) did not contain urate crystals. In the samples where urate crystals could be detected in haematoxylin- eosin stained sections using polarised light, the unstained sections contained much more crystals, which shows that dissolution is greatly decreased on unstained sections.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

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BÉLY Miklós, KRUTSAY Miklós

[In medical practice there are a number of “truths etched in stone” that are passed on from textbook to textbook and learned by generations before they become obsolete. This short study aims to eliminate a misbelief from the diagnosis of gout that is related to the histological detectability of urate deposits. According to the generally accepted thesis, urate crystals obtained from patients with gout are dissolved in formalin solution, therefore, tissue samples should be fixated in alcohol. The authors have found that urate crystals can be detected on conventionally mounted, native (unstained) sections, despite formalin fixation, whereas the great majority of urate crystals are dissolved during haematoxylin-eosin staining. Therefore, for the detection of urate crystals the tissue samples should be examined on native, unstained sections.]