LAM KID

[New findings in the cortical bone biology and its role in bone fractures]

BALOGH Ádám1, BHATTOA Harjit Pál2

JULY 20, 2011

LAM KID - 2011;1(01)

[The authors surveyed the already known factors responsible for the osteoporotic bone fragility. Then the results of using modern imaging techniques (micro-CT, high-resolution peripheral computed quantitative tomograph - HR-pQCT) and advanced computer analytic methods (finite element analysis, FEA) are presented. These data - beyond the already known fracture risk factors (age, risk of falling, bone mineral density - BMD, and fine structure damage of trabecular bone) are stressing the importance of the (micro)damage of cortical bone as a fracture risk factor, which has been still underrated. The cortical thickening and increased porosity - verified on various population samples - are increasing the risk of fractures in certain subgroups of subjects having identical BMD values, even among those, who are considered only osteopenic by the earlier classification based on BMD values. Backed with modern software batteries, the new imaging techniques are expected to enter clinical application in the near future. Pharmacologic agents with stronger cortical effect are already available and research is continuing to find new drugs to use in the management of osteoporotic patients of high fracture risk.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Debreceni Egyetem, Általános Orvosi Kar, Orvos- és Egészségtudományi Centrum, Szülészeti és Nôgyógyászati Klinika
  2. Debreceni Egyetem, Általános Orvosi Kar, Orvos- és Egészségtudományi Centrum, Klinikai Biokémiai és Molekuláris Patológiai Intézet

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[Calcium supplementation and the risk of cardiovascular disease - Real apprehension or picking the spin?]

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[Some data shows that calcium supplementation, a basic intervention for treating osteoporosis in postmenopausal women, may increase the risk of atherosclerotic vascular disease. Coronary artery calcified plaque is a marker for atheromatous plaque burden and predicts future risk of cardiovascular events. However, the deposition of calcium into the vascular wall is due to an active mechanism, involving such genes and proteins which play role in bone metabolism. In this work the data about the cardiovascular side effect of calcium supplementation are reviewed. Also, I demonstrate studies with the conclusions that calcium supplements with or without vitamin D do not increase the risk of cardiovascular events, especially that of myocardial infarction.]

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[The concept of adherence and its significance in osteoporosis]

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[Today, in relation to the economical aspects of medical therapies, the patterns of patients’ drug taking have come into focus. One of the important indicators is adherence, which consists of four different concepts concerning faithfulness to therapy: acceptance, concordance, persistance and compliance. In chronic diesases, medical therapy without a certain degree of adherence is no more useful than no therapy at all. A number of international clinical studies show that in osteoporosis, the therapy can only lead to a decrease in the number of fracture in case of sufficient adherence.]

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[Vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty in the clinical practice]

SZÖLLŐSI Balázs, JAKAB Gábor

[Osteoporosis affects about 600 thousand women and 300 thousand men in Hungary. The fractures give the illness its significance, among them 30-40 thousand vertebral fractures occur annually. One fifth of the patients suffering from vertebral compression fracture (VCF) sustaines an other VCF within a year. The intense pain can not always be controlled under conservative care and an efficient and fast intervention is needed to restore the quality of life of the patients. The cement augmentation (vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty) may help in days. The authors wish to present for the colleagues the details of indication, technical questions of the procedures and their complications based upon the data of numerous operated cases. They emphasize that osteoporotic patients sustained a VCF need complex care and nurture. They also mention that the danger of fracture of a neighbouring vertebra is increased due to the rigidity of the cemented one.]

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[Bone metabolism and the 10-year probability of hip fracture and a major osteoporotic fracture using the country specific FRAX algorithm in men with type 2 diabetes mellitus]

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[Objectives: Was to evaluate 10-year probability of hip fracture and a major osteoporotic fracture using the FRAX algorithm, vitamin D status, bone mineral density (BMD) and biochemical markers of bone turnover in men over 50 years of age with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). We compared FRAX-predicted 10-year fracture probability, levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH-D), markers of bone turnover and bone mineral density at L1-L4 (LS) and femur neck (FN) in 68 men with T2DM with an age- and gender-matched group (n=68). The mean (range) age of the T2DM group was 61.4 (51-78) years. The prevalence of hypovitaminosis D (25-OH-D <75 nmol/L) was 59%. The mean (range) FRAX hip fracture and FRAX major osteoporotic fracture was 0.7 (0-2.8)% and 3.2 (0-8.5)%, respectively. BMD at the FN (0.974 gm/cm2 vs. 0.915 gm/cm2; p = 0.008) and LS (1.221 gm/cm2 vs. 1.068 gm/cm2; p < 0.001) was significantly higher in the T2DM cohort as compared to the healthy age matched males. 25-OH-vitamin D (67.7 nmol/L vs.79.8 nmol/L; p < 0.001), crosslaps (0.19 μg/L vs. 0.24 μg/L; p = 0.004) and osteocalcin (13.3 μg/L vs. 15.7 μg/L; p = 0.004) were significantly lower in the T2DM group. There was no difference in FRAX-related fracture probability between the two groups. The increased BMD in T2DM and the lack of inclusion of T2DM as a risk factor in the FRAX algorithm are probable explanations for the discordance between literature-observed and FRAX-related fracture probabilities.]

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[INTRODUCTION - Osteoporosis is defined as a loss of bone tissue and bone mass that leads to a compromised trength and quality of bones and thus to an increased risk of fractures. In many women, menopausal hormonal changes are associated with an increased bone loss. This population has postmenopausal osteoporosis. The essence of osteporosis treatment is the adequate calcium and vitamin D supplementation, which, if needed, might be combined with drug therapy to inhibit the process of bone loss. METHODS - We assessed the adherence to therapy of Hungarian patients and its effect on the risk of bone fractures, using data recorded by the National Health Insurance Fund Administration between 2004 and 2010 (n=223068, mean age: 69.9 years). We performed a statistical analyses of the available data. Medication possession ratio (MPR) for each treatment and the ratio of patients receiving continuous treatment in the study period (for 12, 18 and 24 months) were estimated. Medication persistence was investigated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. A multivariate Cox proportional hazard model was used to determine the factors influencing the risk of fracture. RESULTS, CONCLUSION - The results of our study show that medication adherence to treatment is low among Hungarian patients [mean MPR: 57.9%; 95% CI (57.7%- 58.0%) and persistence rate: 32.4%; 95% CI (32.2%-32.6%) in the first year]. These parameters are substantially influenced by the administration route and the frequency of treatments [mean MPR ranged 41.5%- 100% and persistence rates ranged 18.8%- 100% in the first year, differences between subgroups were significant (p<0,05)]. Our compliance as well as persistance studies showed that parenteral administration had more beneficial effects. Confirming our preliminary hypotheses, the improvement of patient compliance significantly reduced fracture risk (good compliance was defined as MPR>80%, which was associated with RR: 0.57, p<0.05 for fracture risk). Further improvement might be achieved by parenteral administration [RR for fracture risk 0.60 compared with non-compliant patients and 0.44 compared with compliant subgroups treated with oral and parenteral medications (p<0.05)].]