LAM KID

[Infective sacroiliitis]

BARTHA Attila

OCTOBER 04, 2013

LAM KID - 2013;3(03)

[INTRODUCTION - Pyogen infection of the sacroiliac joint occurs rarely in rheumatological practice. Its clinical symptoms are diverse, so the diagnosis is often made late. CASE REPORT - The author presents a case of a 67-year-old woman. The patient did not have any major diseases nor any predisposing factors for infection. Five days after doing hard physical work she felt strong pain irradiating from her lower back to the right lower limb. She was referred to the Department of Neurology with the diagnosis of right lumbar radiculopathy. She was primarily examined for tumours because of her high red blood cell sedimentation rate and CRP level and her inability to walk. The correct diagnosis was set up on the basis of MRI examination: infective sacroiliitis on the right side, which has spreaded to the adjacent tissues. USguided biopsy was unsuccesful, so empiric antibioitic treatment was started. The patient was discharged from hopsital after 35 days and continued clindamycin therapy at home. At control examination 6 month later she did not have any symptoms or complaints and laboratory examinations did not indicate inflammatory activity. MRI examination still showed an extensive oedema. CONCLUSION - Pyogen arthritis should be considered even in the absence of fever, leukocytosis and predisposing factors. By making the correct diagnosis and starting long-term antibiotic therapy in time, joint destruction is preventable and the patient is curable.]

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