LAM KID

[A magnézium és csonthatásai]

BAJNOK Éva

MAY 30, 2013

LAM KID - 2013;3(02)

[Since 1932, a number of animal studies have demonstrated the correlation of hypomagnesaemia and hypocalcaemia, and the variety of skeletal abnormalities resulting from low magnesium (Mg) intake. Several studies have shown that patients with osteoporosis have a decreased serum magnesium level, which is related to decreased bone mineral content and increased bone fragility. Mg has multiple physiological effects, thus it is not surprising that dozens of hypomagnesaemia-related diseases and symptoms have been reported. Adequate Mg concentration is necessary for the secretion of parathormone and its effect on target organs, activation of vitamin D in the kidney, the maintenance of calcium homeostasis, bone mineralisation and regeneration. Mild hypomagnesaemia is associated with general, atypical symptoms, whereas severe Mg deficiency is a life-threatening condition. Its concentration should be measured in serum and urine. Mg metabolism is determined by its absorption from the intestines and reabsorption in the kidneys. Recently revealed details of these processes give some insights into the mechanisms underlying a number of Mg deficient conditions related to genetic or medical reasons. Mg supplementation may be indicated for patient populations with the highest risk of hypomagnesaemia. For supplementation, the recommended total Mg dose is 350 mg, first in higher doses, several times per day for a longer period, complemented with Ca and K supplementation. Overdosing can only occur in patients with impaired renal function, which necessitates careful monitoring. Adequate Mg supplementation is an inexpensive, safe and effective preventive and therapeutic option for many diseases.]

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