LAM Extra for General Practicioners

[THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS AND CERVICAL CANCER]

KOISS Róbert, SIKLÓS Pál

FEBRUARY 20, 2010

LAM Extra for General Practicioners - 2010;2(01)

[Worldwide, cervical cancer remains the second most frequent malignancy. The estimated number of new cases is 450,000 per year. Approximately 80% of affected women live in developing countries where access to cervical screening programmes is limited. In Europe, more than 12,800 women die each year from this preventable disease. Human papilloma virus (HPV) infection has been proved to be a potential cause of cervical cancer. Secondary screening decreases the morbidity and mortality of the disease, but does not prevent HPV infection. HPV-DNA can be detected in 90-100% of preinvasive and invasive cervical cancer cases. Trials assessing prophylactic anti-HPV vaccination have confirmed that the vaccination is a suitable method for the primary prevention of precancer lesions and cervical cancer.]

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[CONSUMPTION OF MINERAL WATER IN HUNGARY]

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[Natural mineral waters in their "natural form" are meant for public consumption and are officially recognized waters by a certain definition which states that they possess beneficial qualities in medical respects due to their mineral and trace element contents. Our subsurface mineral waters are being bottled without manipulation from about five hundred wells and springs. Nowadays we drink mineral waters to satisfy our biological needs. Hopefully in place of the "germanic type" mineral waters containing traditionally higher level of minerals, the "mediterran type" mineral waters containing less salt will come to the front in the future. We consume above 15 grams pro day of salt in place of the suggested under 6 grams pro day. Reducing the salt content of the foods and consuming less salt can prevent the rising of blood pressure and tone down the risks of developing cardiovascular diseases. The Hungarian Society of Hypertension therefore announces the serious reduction of sodium chlorid consumption for the year 2010 as part of the STOP-SALT Program and the Hungarian National Cardiovascular Program possibly including the desire to consume less mineral water with high sodium levels.]

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KAPOCSI Judit, DEÁK György

[Menopause and pregnancy are especially vulnerable periods of women’s life regarding hypertension. The “Guidelines for the Management of Arterial Hypertension”, issued by the European Society of Hypertension and the European Society of Cardiology, dedicates a separate chapter to hypertension in women. The renewed guidelines of the Hungarian Society of Hypertension also pays a special attention to hypertension detected during pregnancy. In this article, the euthors review the topics of hypertension detected during menopause and pregnancy, discussing pathomechanism and therapy.]

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[The high incidence of oral carcinoma in Hungary is attributed primarily to tobacco and alcohol use. Recently, however, a series of publications suggested a role for humán papillomavirus in the development of oral carcinoma. For this reason we reviewed the literature regarding the associations of human papillomavirus with oral carcinoma and its preblastomatoses. We also overviewed research aiming to develop reliable methods for early diagnosis that are also suitable for screening. Early diagnosis and treatment may significantly improve the prospects of the patient. In addition, the addition of already available human papilloma virus vaccines into national vaccination programs and the extension of vaccination for both sexes may decrease the prevalence of oral carcinoma associated with human papillomavirus infection that primarily affects younger populations.]

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