LAM Extra for General Practicioners

[HOW DIABETOGENIC IS STATIN THERAPY?]

CSÁSZÁR Albert

FEBRUARY 20, 2012

LAM Extra for General Practicioners - 2012;4(01)

[According to the latest guidelines, the goal in cardiovascular prevention is to achieve an LDL-cholesterol level no higher than 1.8 mmol/l in the high risk and extra high risk groups. According to international recommendations, statin should be used at the highest tolerable dose rather than any combination treatments. In a number of cases, higher doses are associated with increased side effects, which rarely affect liver enzymes and CK-parameters. A metaanalysis published in 2011 made it clear that higher statin doses compared with low-medium doses can increase the occurence of newonset diabetes by about 12%. This is presumably a class effect, which is not significant according to the guidelines, and which is much lesser than the benefits of this therapy in the prevention of cardiovascular events, thus, it obviously does not question the justification of statin treatment. However, the observed association implies that during statin therapy of nondiabetic patients, blood glucose control should be performed every year, and, if needed, an oral glucose tolerance test should be performed to detect the potential development of diabetes.]

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LAM Extra for General Practicioners

[PAIN MANAGEMENT IN RHEUMATOLOGY]

NAGY Katalin

[Pain is the most common symptom in rheumatology, which can be of mechanical or inflammatory origin, acute and chronic, nociceptive, neuropathic and psychogenic. Pain can be relieved by analgesics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, opioids, adjuvants and special drugs depending on the etiology, for example a gout attack can be stopped by colchicine. For pain relief, we use therapeutic guidelines of the World Health Organization (WHO), which recommends the use of analgesics, NSAIDs and adjuvants as the first step, weaker opioids as the second, and strong opioids as the third step. In rheumatology, the first step's drugs are generally used. If possible, NSAIDs should be administered briefly, potentially combined with analgesics and muscle relaxants. If pain management is insufficient, tramadol should be given. Pain relief in rheumatology also include the use of local and intraarticular injections, physiotherapy, TENS and balneotherapy. Complex therapies that combine the above mentioned methods is often more effective than the use of medications only.]

LAM Extra for General Practicioners

[PYCNOGENOL IN THE CLINICAL PRACTICE]

KISS István, TAVASZY Mariann, FARSANG Csaba

[Polyphenols, which belong to the group of flavonoids, can be found in a number of plants, and are present in a high concentration in the French maritime pine bark. The authors summarise results of large-scale experimental and clinical studies on pycnogenol, the standardised extract of French maritime pine bark. Pycnogenol decreases production and effects of free radicals (antioxidant effect). It has antiinflammatory properties, and, by the stimulation of eNOSsynthesis, it increases the production of vasodilatory compounds (e.g. NO, prostacyclin) and decreases that of vascoconstrictor compounds (endothelin-1, thromboxane) materials. These changes lead to vasodilation, which results in increased tissue perfusion and decreased blood pressure. Pycnogenol also decreases platelet aggregation and LDL-cholesterol level and increases HDL-cholesterol level. Its antidiabetic effect has also been shown. Consequently, it may substantially decrease cardiovascular risk. In addition to these results, pycnogenol has been also found to have antibacterial and antiviral effects. It has been successfully used in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, as well as in adults with dysmenorrhea, climacterial disturbances, glaucoma or asthma bronchiale.]

LAM Extra for General Practicioners

[ANTIDIABETIC THERAPY OF PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES - THE PLACE OF ADMINISTRATION OF ACARBOSE]

KEMPLER Péter

[Administration of the alpha-glucosidase enzyme inhibitor acarbose leads to a prolonged absorption of carbohydrates, which has a smoothing effect on blood glucose excursions, and results in a more even daily blood glucose profile. The glucose lowering effect is mainly due to the reduction of postprandial blood glucose levels. Non-glycaemic effects of acarbose, including those on blood pressure, lipids and the coagulation system are also clearly beneficial. According to the available data, the preparation also reduces cardiovascular risk. If used as a monotherapy, acarbose does not cause hypoglycaemia. Flatulence and diaorrhea represent the main side effects. From a professional point of view, acarbose should be given if postprandial blood glucose excursions exceed 2.2 mmol/l.]

LAM Extra for General Practicioners

[FAIR-HF]

MATOS Lajos

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LAM Extra for General Practicioners

[NEW POTENTIAL PERSPECTIVES OF STATIN THERAPY]

CSÁSZÁR Albert

[Statins have become crucial components of the therapy of cardiovascular diseases. Beyond their cholesterol-lowering effect, statins turned out to have further beneficial effects on various vascular mechanisms. One of the best known effects is antithrombotic capacity, which is related partly to platelet function and partly to the coagulation cascade. Besides experimental observations, interventional clinical trials have also demonstrated that statins have an antithrombotic effect both in arterial and venous thrombosis. Regarding the effects of statins on dementia, previous studies with relatively small sample sizes had controversial results. Recently, two observational studies of tens of thousands of elderly patients reported that statins reduce the incidence of nonvascular dementia. Evaluation of the data revealed that statins have pleiotropic effects in this case, too. The results discussed here shed light on new benefits of statin therapy used for reducing cardiovascular mortality, namely the prevention of thrombotic events and dementia. These benefits are related to the antithrombotic and anti-inflammatoric capacity of statins.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[ACEi or ARB? What are the results of the comparative analysis?]

BENCZÚR Béla

[Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are treatment options for patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) or those with cardiovascular risk factors. The comparative efficacy and safety of ACEis and ARBs have been much debated. To compare the benefits of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) in patients without heart failure a metaanalysis was carried out based on 254.301 subjects of 106 randomised trials. Meta-analysis included randomized trials of ACEis and ARBs compared with placebo or active controls and corroborated with head-to-head trials of ARBs vs ACEis. According to placebo controlled studies ACEis but not ARBs reduced all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality and MI. It seems that ACEis are more effective than ARBs. But this is only true if we take into account the trials before 2000. The analysis restricted to trials published after 2000 revealed similar outcomes with ACEis vs placebo and ARBs vs placebo. Head-to-head comparison trials of ARBs vs ACEis exhibited no difference in outcomes. The underlying causes and details are explained in this review.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[The role of vitamin D receptor and the risk reducing effect of vitamin D receptor agonists in chronic kidney disease]

KISS István, KULCSÁR Imre, BARABÁS Noémi, KERKOVITS Lóránt

[Vitamin D3 is produced in the skin and is modified in the liver and kidney to the active metabolite form, 1,25-dyhydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol). Calcitriol binds to a nuclear receptor, the vitamin D receptor (VDR), and activates processes that bind to vitamin D. The classical effects of vitamin D receptor activator or agonist (VDRA) therapy for the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism in patients with chronic kidney disease primarily involves suppressive effects on the parathyroid gland, and regulation of calcium and phosphorus absorption in the intestine an mobilization in bone. Several VDR agonists have been developed for the treatment of osteoporosis, hyperparathyroidism secondary to chronic kidney disease (CKD), and psoriasis. Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) is a common and serious consequence of CKD. SHPT is a complex condition characterized by a decline in 1,25-dihidroxi vitamin D and consequent VDR activation, abnormalities in serum calcium and phosphorus levels, parathyroid gland hyperplasia, elevated parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion, and systemic mineral and bone abnormalities. There are three classes of drug used for treatment of SHPT (non-selective and selective VDR activators, and calcimimetics). Observational studies in hemodialysis patients report improved cardiovascular and allcause survival among those received VDRA therapy compared with those not on VDRA therapy. The survival benefits of selective VDRA paricalcitol appear to be linked to "non classical" action of VDRA, possibly through VDRA-mediated modulation of gene expression. VRDAs are reported to have beneficial effects such as anti-inflammatory and antithrombotic effects, inhibition of vascular calcification and stiffening, inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, and regression of left ventricular hypertrophy. VDRA are also reported to negatively regulate the renin-angiotensin system, which plays a key role in hypertension, myocardial infarction and stroke. Data from epidemiological, preclinical and clinical studies have shown that vitamin D and/or 25(OH) vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The selective VDR agonists are associated direct protective effects on glomerular architecture and antiproteinuric effects in response to renal damage. Emerging evidence suggest that VDR plays important roles in modulating cardiovascular, immunological, metabolic and other function. Paricalcitol may prove to have a substantial beneficial effect on cardiac disease and its outcome in patients with CKD.]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[Meta-analysis about the Incontinence-associated dermatitis prevention ]

KÓSZÓ Lilla, NAGY Erika

[Background: The maintenance of tissue integrity is an essential part of qualitative nursing. There is a wide scale of products serving the prevention of Incontinence-associated Dermatitis (IAD). However, there is little evidence nurses know about them, making their choice of strategy difficult. Aim: To produce an evidence based publication about the preventive products of IAD, helping nurses in their choice of strategy. Method: In our meta analysis we examined the content of the Medline and Scopus database with special focus on English and Hungarian publications from the last ten years. From the 17459 articles relevant in this topic we analyzed and included 9 studies serving our criteria. Records: We found several methods of prevention; Washing without water, special absorbent pants, protocols and a study about the ’perineal pouch’. The studies were compared from the aspect of IAD prevalence, severity and cost effects. The 3in1 products and protokolls are should be used is the hungarian nursing practice.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Risk categories, goals and treatment of hypercholesterolemia in Europe and in the recommendations of the AHA/ACC]

PADOS Gyula, KARÁDI István, AUDIKOVSZKY Mária, REIBER István, PARAGH György

[Hypercholesterolemia is one of the most important major risk factors that can be most influenced. Its treatment is based on guidelines. In 2013 in Hungary the common guideline of 17 societies (MKKK) as well as the recommendations of EAS/ESC and those of IAS are at disposal. These recommendations have established similar risk categories and strict LDL-cholesterol goals (<1.8 mmol/l). On 12 November, 2013, in the USA after a long drawn debate the AHA/ACC - without any lipid association - issued a new cholesterol (Ch) guideline, which drasticly differs from the existing national and European recommendations. According to AHA/ACC each patient with cardiovascular disease or diabetes should be treated with statin, irrespective of the Ch value, All patients with a LDL-Ch level over 4.9 mmol/l should also be treated with statin. In primary prevention those with values between 1.8-4.9 (LDL-Ch), or 3.5-8.0 mmol/l (Ch) would also be given statin, if their risk is more than 7.5%, with the new calculator system (“Statin Benefit Groups”). These recommendations would eliminate the classic risk categories (very-high, high, moderate risk), would abolish the system of treatment goals, as well as the regular Ch test. The non-statin therapy is not supported even in combinations. A big part of the population with low Ch level would also receive statin based on the results with the calculator, meaning that in the USA the number of those treated might double. Not only the European (e.g. EAS/,ESC) but even American societies (National Lipid Association 2013-2014) (e.g. NLA) oppose to the new guideline of AHA/ACC.]