LAM Extra for General Practicioners

[HOW DIABETOGENIC IS STATIN THERAPY?]

CSÁSZÁR Albert

FEBRUARY 20, 2012

LAM Extra for General Practicioners - 2012;4(01)

[According to the latest guidelines, the goal in cardiovascular prevention is to achieve an LDL-cholesterol level no higher than 1.8 mmol/l in the high risk and extra high risk groups. According to international recommendations, statin should be used at the highest tolerable dose rather than any combination treatments. In a number of cases, higher doses are associated with increased side effects, which rarely affect liver enzymes and CK-parameters. A metaanalysis published in 2011 made it clear that higher statin doses compared with low-medium doses can increase the occurence of newonset diabetes by about 12%. This is presumably a class effect, which is not significant according to the guidelines, and which is much lesser than the benefits of this therapy in the prevention of cardiovascular events, thus, it obviously does not question the justification of statin treatment. However, the observed association implies that during statin therapy of nondiabetic patients, blood glucose control should be performed every year, and, if needed, an oral glucose tolerance test should be performed to detect the potential development of diabetes.]

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LAM Extra for General Practicioners

[PAIN MANAGEMENT IN RHEUMATOLOGY]

NAGY Katalin

[Pain is the most common symptom in rheumatology, which can be of mechanical or inflammatory origin, acute and chronic, nociceptive, neuropathic and psychogenic. Pain can be relieved by analgesics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, opioids, adjuvants and special drugs depending on the etiology, for example a gout attack can be stopped by colchicine. For pain relief, we use therapeutic guidelines of the World Health Organization (WHO), which recommends the use of analgesics, NSAIDs and adjuvants as the first step, weaker opioids as the second, and strong opioids as the third step. In rheumatology, the first step's drugs are generally used. If possible, NSAIDs should be administered briefly, potentially combined with analgesics and muscle relaxants. If pain management is insufficient, tramadol should be given. Pain relief in rheumatology also include the use of local and intraarticular injections, physiotherapy, TENS and balneotherapy. Complex therapies that combine the above mentioned methods is often more effective than the use of medications only.]

LAM Extra for General Practicioners

[ANTIDIABETIC THERAPY OF PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES - THE PLACE OF ADMINISTRATION OF ACARBOSE]

KEMPLER Péter

[Administration of the alpha-glucosidase enzyme inhibitor acarbose leads to a prolonged absorption of carbohydrates, which has a smoothing effect on blood glucose excursions, and results in a more even daily blood glucose profile. The glucose lowering effect is mainly due to the reduction of postprandial blood glucose levels. Non-glycaemic effects of acarbose, including those on blood pressure, lipids and the coagulation system are also clearly beneficial. According to the available data, the preparation also reduces cardiovascular risk. If used as a monotherapy, acarbose does not cause hypoglycaemia. Flatulence and diaorrhea represent the main side effects. From a professional point of view, acarbose should be given if postprandial blood glucose excursions exceed 2.2 mmol/l.]

LAM Extra for General Practicioners

[PYCNOGENOL IN THE CLINICAL PRACTICE]

KISS István, TAVASZY Mariann, FARSANG Csaba

[Polyphenols, which belong to the group of flavonoids, can be found in a number of plants, and are present in a high concentration in the French maritime pine bark. The authors summarise results of large-scale experimental and clinical studies on pycnogenol, the standardised extract of French maritime pine bark. Pycnogenol decreases production and effects of free radicals (antioxidant effect). It has antiinflammatory properties, and, by the stimulation of eNOSsynthesis, it increases the production of vasodilatory compounds (e.g. NO, prostacyclin) and decreases that of vascoconstrictor compounds (endothelin-1, thromboxane) materials. These changes lead to vasodilation, which results in increased tissue perfusion and decreased blood pressure. Pycnogenol also decreases platelet aggregation and LDL-cholesterol level and increases HDL-cholesterol level. Its antidiabetic effect has also been shown. Consequently, it may substantially decrease cardiovascular risk. In addition to these results, pycnogenol has been also found to have antibacterial and antiviral effects. It has been successfully used in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, as well as in adults with dysmenorrhea, climacterial disturbances, glaucoma or asthma bronchiale.]

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[Authors address the issue of inadequate physical activity worldwide and analyze their relationship with cardiovascular diseases and total mortality. In the inactivity "world map" it can be seen that in economically developed countries it is very common but other ethnic and regional factors also play a role and it is significantly more frequent at women. In our country this phenomenon due to combination of advanced civilization and computerization is also frequent. From 2000 to 2015, the trend of the presence of physical inactivity (FI) in the high income populations is steadily rising. Convincing evidence suggests that FI increases the risk of many common, serious diseases, including ischaemic heart disease, type 2 diabetes, breast cancer and colon carcinoma, and reduces the life expectancy. For these four diaseses, the incidence of FI occurs in about 1/3 of cases and 35% of total mortality. Its health value (PAF) ranges from 10 to 18%. Low (non-regular) exercise increases the risk of hypertension with or without family history. In subjects with moderate and intensive levels of physical activity (FA), there is a significantly lower mortality rate and the rate of occurrence of major cardiovasculars (CV) diseases compared to those with lower grade FA. Behind the positive effect of physical activity there is a multiple and complicated mechanism that manifests itself in the vascular system, in the physiological adaptation of the heart and in other metabolic and cellular effects. ]