Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[The role of a weekly geriatric exercise programme in successful aging]

KOVÁCS Éva1, VIRÁG Anikó2, DUDÁS Flóra3, ERDŐS Réka3, PETRIDISZ Anna Niké3, ROZS Franciska3

AUGUST 30, 2017

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice - 2017;30(04)

[Objective: The aim of this retrospective study was to examine the effects of a weekly held group multicomponent exercise programme (consisting of aerobic, strengthening, flexibiliy, and balance exercises) on the functional abilities (muscle strength, walking speed, and static balance) among elderly people. Methods: Thirty eight older people were divided into two groups: the active group for those elderly who took part is the training for at least 2 years, and the inactive group for those who did not take part in the training before. The global muscle strength in the lower extremity was measured with the 5 sit-to-tand test, the walking speed was measured with the 4 meters walking test. To examine the static balance, we used the one-leg stance test. To determine the subjective well-being, a Visual Analog Scale was used. Results: The Active group was significantly better in 5 sit-to-tand test (t(36)=2,602; p=0,013; Cohen’d=0,99), and marginally significant difference was found in the 4 meters walking test (t(36)= 1,769; p=0,085; Cohen’d=0,66) to the benefit of the Active group. In the term of static balance, we could not find significant difference. Conclusions: This programme for elderly people is effective to improve the global lower limb muscle strenght and walking speed of the elderly, but not very effective in improving static balance.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Semmelweis Egyetem Egészségtudományi Kar Alapozó Egészségtudományi Intézet Morfológiai és Fiziológiai Tanszék
  2. Semmelweis Egyetem Egészségtudományi Kar Alkalmazott Egészségtudományi Intézet Fizioterápia Tanszék
  3. Semmelweis Egyetem Egészségtudományi Kar BSc Gyógytornász szakirány

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