Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[About Therapy Data Management System (TDMS) by nurses]

SOMOSI László, LADÁNYI Erzsébet

FEBRUARY 28, 2016

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice - 2016;29(01)

[Recently, the precise management of dialysis-related documentation has become a big responsibility and burden. As a result, less time is available to perform daily nursing tasks. Therefore, our company has introduced the Therapy Data Management System (TDMS) at 10 dialysis centres. The system was developed to reduce the administrative burden and provide information to the staff about the current dialysis session. The TDMS loads the dialysis treatment prescription from the data recording programme used in our network to the dialysis machine. Two main elements are used: data base for treatment monitoring and current treatment parameters. The database for treatment monitoring is used for data input (using the computers in the unit), while the current treatment parameters are used as data input to the dialysis devices and for data documentation. Patients are identified by patient identification cards recording weight before and after the dialysis session. The programme automatically calculates the current ultrafiltration, but data can be modified if necessary. After loading and validating the parameters, treatment can be initiated. With the introduction of the TDMS the time spent for documentation was reduced by 15-20 minutes per patientshift and nurse. Dialysis can be started more easily and quickly, because the parameters of the current treatment always appear on the screen. Moreover, the risk of administration errors is reduced. This system effectively supports the daily work in clinical practice. It provides quick and easy access for all users of the management of haemodialysis patient. Keywords: dialysis, data recording, Therapy Monitor, TDMS ]

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