Hypertension and nephrology

[The beginning and difficulties of peritoneal dialysis at the end of the last century - Part I. International experiences]

KARÁTSON András

MARCH 22, 2013

Hypertension and nephrology - 2013;17(01)

[The theoretical background of peritoneal dialysis dates back to the 18th and 19th century. It was in 1923 when the first experimental and clinical experiences were summarised by Ganter from Munich. Of the Hungarian researchers Stephen Rosenak’s name can be mentioned, who was working in this field in Bonn in 1926 and later in London and New York. Obstacles to the spread of this treatment method was the lack of appropriate abdominal catheters, biocompatible solutions and equipment. The intermittent technique of the method was time consuming and, due to the conditions of that time, peritonitis frequently developed. The spread of the method was facilitated by the catheter constructed by Tenchkoff towards the end of the 1960s, the automatization of the treatment and later continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) described by Popovich and Moncrief. Further development of the method became possible by the use of the two-litre plastic bags instead of the bottled solution and later a twin-bag system employing the “flush before fill” technique. The occurrence of peritonitis developing during the treatment gradually decreased, in which Stephen I. Vas of Hungarian origin, working in Toronto as a professor of microbiology played an important role by constantly improving and modifying the principles of the therapy. Besides the infection in the abdominal cavity the bioincompatibility of the dialysis fluid presented another problem, which was solved by the use of essential amino acids, icodextrin instead of glucose and bicarbonate instead of lactate. By the turn of the century it became clear that the survival rate of peritoneal dialysis is very similar to that of hemodialysis in the second and third years following the treatment, while in relation to the quality of life it proved to be better. This observation has been proved in numerous clinical studies in the past decade and has been refined with regard to patients’ age, their primary and accompanying diseases. It is my intention to give account of the Hungarian experiences with peritoneal dialysis in the second part.]

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Hypertension and nephrology

[Article Reports]

VÁLYI Péter

Hypertension and nephrology

[Report on the 10th Regional Hypertension Day]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Paradigmal changes in renal replacement therapy. Dialysis and drug therapy of quality in chronic renal patients - Optimal and adequate opportunities of dialysis therapy]

KISS István, SZEGEDI János, FODOR Erzsébet, BARABÁS Noémi, REMPORT Ádám, AMBRUS Csaba, KULCSÁR Imre

[Researches over the past thirty years, many results have been related to acute and chronic renal failure pathophysiology, clinical characteristics and therapy. Can be more than just the uremic toxins and their characteristics of the regulation of salt and water balance, renal anemia treatment, uremic metabolic disorders, calcium phosphate and lipid metabolism dysfunction. Improve the quality of treatment and reduce mortality and options can be influenced by factors come to, therefore, execution and technique of dialysis therapy. We know the primary concern of the treatment period for reducing mortality. This is best for intermittent treatments increased (4.5-6 hours) treatment will help. Narrow scope is optional for the treatment several times a week treatment, the daily 8-hour long nightly therapy. The mortality of the patient significantly influenced by age, gender, co-morbidities, fluid balance and the CaxPO4. The technical side is the key factor influencing the dialysis fluid purity and membrane properties. The use of high-flux membranes is clearly improving the quality of treatment, the additional benefit of hemodiafiltration therapy, the mortality for those still controversial. For optimal dialysis adequacy, complexity may result in reducing mortality and improving the quality of life in chronic dialysis patients.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[ESH Advanced Course on Hypertension – St. Moritz, 3-10 March 2013]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Causes of and therapeutic opportunities in resistant hypertension]

SIMONYI Gábor, GENCSI Kristína

[Hypertension is an independent cardiovascular risk factor and one of the most frequent diseases in Hungary. In the treatment of hypertensive patients usually more than two drugs are needed for the appropriate blood pressure control. Resistant hypertension (RH) is defined when blood pressure remains above target value despite full doses of antihypertensive medications, which consist of at least three different classes of drugs including a diuretic administered in maximal doses. The frequency of RH can reach 20-30% among hypertensive patients. RH increases the cardiovascular risk because of the lack of target blood pressure. RH is multifactorial and it is important to exclude pseudo-resistant hypertension (e.g. poor compliance, white coat effect). In the background of RH we can find lifestyle factors (e.g. obesity, excessive salt intake, alcoholism, etc.) and a variety of drugs (e.g. non-steroids, corticosteroids, sympathomimetics). In the pathogenesis of RH the increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system has an important role. In the treatment of RH we should manage lifestyle factors and it is important to assess the drugs and diseases (e.g. sleep apnea, chronic kidney disease, diabetes mellitus) which may cause increased blood pressure. It is no exact recommendations for the treatment of RH. Therapy often consists of 4-5 various drugs in combination. An important role has the device therapy of RH in recent years (e.g. stimulation of the carotid baroreceptors and renal denervation) as well.]

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Hypertension and nephrology

[The beginnings and difficulties of peritoneal dialysis at the end of the last century. Part II. Hungarian experiences]

KARÁTSON András

[In Part I, I summarised the beginnings, the theoretical background and the international experiences of peritoneal dialysis. Hungarian publications related to peritoneal dialysis in the 1950s were focusing on the role of the method in the treatment of chronic renal disorders. The first dialysis centres were established in the medical universities of Hungary (Szeged in 1955, Budapest in 1960, Pécs in 1964, Debrecen in 1970) and in Miskolc in 1968. Despite the restricted hemodialysis capacities the intermittent technique of peritoneal dialysis did not spread in accordance with the demand. A survey conducted at the beginning of the 1970’s in the territory of the five counties with 1.5 million inhabitants revealed that considering the numbers of patients with renal diseases requiring dialysis, developing of a network of care and increasing the dialysis capacities is necessary and so is the development of a system of szatellite peritoneal dialysis, which was implemented with our support in 10 units of the county hospitals. A devoted and enthusiastic organiser of the nation-wide system of peritoneal dialysis was professor Taraba, who, due to his untimely death, was deprived of seeing the nation-wide spread of CAPD. At the beginning of the 1980’s the first reports on the favourable effects of CAPD appeared in Hungary. Solutions prepared in pharmacies and the lack of up-to-date equipment resulted in the frequent occurrence of peritonitis. In addition, the unfavourable memories of dialysis performed with bottled solutions (long treatment times, frequently peritonitis) were still vivid among patients and colleagues supervising the treatment. As a consequence, our survey conducted in 1991 revealed that the spread of CAPD all over the world in Hungary resulted in a significant increase of those treated with the intermittent method (more than 10% of the dialysis patients), while those treated with CAPD remained under 2%. Several reports on CAPD and the consequences that followed from them as well as the further training organised in the Szent Margit Hospital, Budapest and in Gánt, and also the guidelines issued by the Society of Hungarian Nephrologists the number of those treated with dialysis has exceeded 6000 in the past decade. 10% of them received CAPD/APD treatment.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Late simultaneous carcinomatous meningitis, temporal bone infiltrating macro-metastasis and disseminated multi-organ micro-metastases presenting with mono-symptomatic vertigo – a clinico-pathological case reporT

JARABIN András János, KLIVÉNYI Péter, TISZLAVICZ László, MOLNÁR Anna Fiona, GION Katalin, FÖLDESI Imre, KISS Geza Jozsef, ROVÓ László, BELLA Zsolt

Although vertigo is one of the most common complaints, intracranial malignant tumors rarely cause sudden asymmetry between the tone of the vestibular peripheries masquerading as a peripheral-like disorder. Here we report a case of simultaneous temporal bone infiltrating macro-metastasis and disseminated multi-organ micro-metastases presenting as acute unilateral vestibular syndrome, due to the reawakening of a primary gastric signet ring cell carcinoma. Purpose – Our objective was to identify those pathophysiological steps that may explain the complex process of tumor reawakening, dissemination. The possible causes of vestibular asymmetry were also traced. A 56-year-old male patient’s interdisciplinary medical data had been retrospectively analyzed. Original clinical and pathological results have been collected and thoroughly reevaluated, then new histological staining and immunohistochemistry methods have been added to the diagnostic pool. During the autopsy the cerebrum and cerebellum was edematous. The apex of the left petrous bone was infiltrated and destructed by a tumor mass of 2x2 cm in size. Histological reexamination of the original gastric resection specimen slides revealed focal submucosal tumorous infiltration with a vascular invasion. By immunohistochemistry mainly single infiltrating tumor cells were observed with Cytokeratin 7 and Vimentin positivity and partial loss of E-cadherin staining. The subsequent histological examination of necropsy tissue specimens confirmed the disseminated, multi-organ microscopic tumorous invasion. Discussion – It has been recently reported that the expression of Vimentin and the loss of E-cadherin is significantly associated with advanced stage, lymph node metastasis, vascular and neural invasion and undifferentiated type with p<0.05 significance. As our patient was middle aged and had no immune-deficiency, the promoting factor of the reawakening of the primary GC malignant disease after a 9-year-long period of dormancy remained undiscovered. The organ-specific tropism explained by the “seed and soil” theory was unexpected, due to rare occurrence of gastric cancer to metastasize in the meninges given that only a minority of these cells would be capable of crossing the blood brain barrier. Patients with past malignancies and new onset of neurological symptoms should alert the physician to central nervous system involvement, and the appropriate, targeted diagnostic and therapeutic work-up should be established immediately. Targeted staining with specific antibodies is recommended. Recent studies on cell lines indicate that metformin strongly inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition of gastric cancer cells. Therefore, further studies need to be performed on cases positive for epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

Hypertension and nephrology

[About the care of patients with hyperuricaemia and gout]

[This consensus document is intended to provide guidance for the effective and efficient treatment of asymptomatic individuals with high uric acid levels and gout patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[What happens to vertiginous population after emission from the Emergency Department?]

MAIHOUB Stefani, MOLNÁR András, CSIKÓS András, KANIZSAI Péter, TAMÁS László, SZIRMAI Ágnes

[Background – Dizziness is one of the most frequent complaints when a patient is searching for medical care and resolution. This can be a problematic presentation in the emergency department, both from a diagnostic and a management standpoint. Purpose – The aim of our study is to clarify what happens to patients after leaving the emergency department. Methods – 879 patients were examined at the Semmel­weis University Emergency Department with vertigo and dizziness. We sent a questionnaire to these patients and we had 308 completed papers back (110 male, 198 female patients, mean age 61.8 ± 12.31 SD), which we further analyzed. Results – Based on the emergency department diagnosis we had the following results: central vestibular lesion (n = 71), dizziness or giddiness (n = 64) and BPPV (n = 51) were among the most frequent diagnosis. Clarification of the final post-examination diagnosis took several days (28.8%), and weeks (24.2%). It was also noticed that 24.02% of this population never received a proper diagnosis. Among the population only 80 patients (25.8%) got proper diagnosis of their complaints, which was supported by qualitative statistical analysis (Cohen Kappa test) result (κ = 0.560). Discussion – The correlation between our emergency department diagnosis and final diagnosis given to patients is low, a phenomenon that is also observable in other countries. Therefore, patient follow-up is an important issue, including the importance of neurotology and possibly neurological examination. Conclusion – Emergency diagnosis of vertigo is a great challenge, but despite of difficulties the targeted and quick case history and exact examination can evaluate the central or peripheral cause of the balance disorder. Therefore, to prevent declination of the quality of life the importance of further investigation is high.]