Hypertension and nephrology

[Study of attitude of dialysis patients to renal transplantation]

VÁMOS Eszter Panna1,2, CSÉPÁNYI Gábor1, MOLNÁR Miklós Zsolt1,3, RÉTHELYI János4, KOVÁCS Ágnes1, MARTON Adrienn2, NÉMETH Zsófia2, NOVÁK Márta1,5, MUCSI István1,2

FEBRUARY 20, 2010

Hypertension and nephrology - 2010;14(01)

[Background: Treatment decisions made by patients with chronic kidney disease are crucial in the renal transplantation process. These decisions are influenced, amongst other factors, by attitudes towards different treatment options, which are modulated by knowledge and perceptions about the disease and its treatment and many other subjective factors. Here we study the attitude of dialysis patients to renal transplantation and the association of sociodemographic characteristics, patient perceptions, experiences with this attitude. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, all patients from eight dialysis units in Budapest, Hungary, who were on hemodialysis for at least three months were approached to complete a self-administered questionnaire. Data collected from 459 patients younger than 70 years were analyzed in this manuscript. Results: Mean age of the study population was 53±12 years, 54% was male, the prevalence of diabetes was 22%. Patients with positive attitude to renal transplantation were younger (51±11 vs. 58±11 years), better educated, more likely to be employed (11% vs. 4%) and had prior transplantation (15% vs. 7%) (p<0.05 for all). In a multivariate model negative patient perceptions about transplantation, negative expectations about health outcomes after transplantation, presence of fears about the transplant surgery were associated, in addition to increasing age, with unwillingness to consider transplantation. Conclusions: Negative attitudes to renal transplantation are associated with potentially modifiable factors. It would be necessary to develop standardized, comprehensible patient information systems and personalized decision support in order to facilitate modality selection and to enable patients to make fully informed treatment decisions.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Semmelweis Egyetem, Magatartástudományi Intézet, Budapest
  2. Semmelweis Egyetem, I. Sz. Belgyógyászati Klinika, Budapest
  3. Semmelweis Egyetem, Transzplantációs és Sebészeti Klinika, Budapest
  4. Semmelweis Egyetem, Pszichiátriai és Pszichoterápiás Klinika, Budapest
  5. Department of Psychiatry, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada

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[Nephronophthisis is an autosomal recessive, chronic tubulointerstitial nephropathy, responsible for 6-10% of childhood chronic renal failure cases. Its first symptoms, polyuria-polydipsia, anaemia and failure to thrive precede the development of end-stage renal disease by years. Increased echogenicity with loss of corticomedullary differentiation are the key findings on ultrasound, the lack of cysts does not rule out the diagnosis. Histologically, it is characterized by interstitial fibrosis and irregularities of the tubular basal membrane. Genetically, it is highly heterogeneous. Ten nephronophthisis genes have already been identified in 60% of the patients. The encoded proteins - similarly to other proteins mutated in cystic kidney diseases - are localized to primary cilium-basal body-centrosomal complex.]

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