Hypertension and nephrology

[Remembering Professor Péter Bálint on his 100th Birth Anniversary ]

BARTHA Jenő

DECEMBER 20, 2011

Hypertension and nephrology - 2011;15(05)

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Hypertension and nephrology

[Antihypertensive therapy in patients with COPD - the significance of nebivolol]

FARSANG Csaba

[The occurrence of hypertension associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is increasing. Recognising COPD is important in order to choose the appropriate antihypertensive drugs. Anti-hypertensive drugs that can be used to treat patients with hypertension and COPD include diuretics, ACE-inhibitors, angioten-sine receptor blockers (AT1 receptor antagonists) and calcium antagonists, as well as cardioselective beta blockers, as these drugs decrease total and cardiovascular mortality. Of these agents, the importance of the most cardioselective one, nebivolol should be stressed, as this drug has no clinically significant effect on parameters of respiratory function, and, through its additional effects (namely by increasing the synthesis of NO), it has a beneficial effect on COPD-related deterioration of respiratory functions, haemodynamic alterations (cor pulmonale) and local factors that participate in the respiratory inflammation and endothelial dysfunction.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Similarities and differences in the renal effects of statins]

ÁBRAHÁM György

[By efficiently reducing serum cholesterol level, statins significantly decrease both cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Decreasing LDL-cholesterol level by 1% reduces coronary mortality risk by 1%, whereas increasing HDL-cholesterol level by 1% reduces the risk by 3%. At the same time, renal failure significantly increases cardiovascular events and/or mortality compared with the population mean. It is an exciting question whether statins are able to prevent and decelerate the deterioration of kidney function deterioration, preserve GFR and decrease albuminuria. Depending on the strength of their effect, statins have different cholesterollowering capacity (rosuvastatin and atorvastatin are especially effective). An important question is whether these differences can be detected in the renal function as well. The results of experimental data and major clinical trials (e.g. AURORA, PLANET I-II, SHARP) are often controversial. Nevertheless, statin therapy has advantages for patients with kidney diseases, although to a lesser extent than it has in the normal population.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Genetics of isolated steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome - results of the two decades around the turn of the millennium]

TORY Kálmán, KERTI Andrea, REUSZ György

[Childhood steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) is a devastating clinical condition which progresses to end-stage renal disease in 30-40% of the cases after a follow up of 10 years. Based on its etiology, two forms can be distinguished, an immune and a genetic form. During the last two decades, mutations of ten genes - encoding mainly podocyte proteins - were identified in the latter group. As the treatment in the immune and genetic forms are different, and only the identification of the causative mutation can reliably distinguish them, it is important to be familiarized with the genotype-phenotype correlations. The aim of the present review is to summarize our current knowledge on the phenotypes linked to the identified genes.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Association of body composition and mortality in patients on maintenance dialysis and on waitlist and after kidney transplantation]

UJSZÁSZI Ákos, KALANTAR-ZADEH Kamyar, MOLNÁR Miklós Zsolt

[Overweight [body mass index (BMI) = 25-30 kg/m2] and obesity (BMI ≥30 kg/m2) are epidemic in both developed and developing countries. Obesity has been recognized as risk factor for the development and progression of chronic kidney disease and is associated with increased cardiovascular risk and poor survival. Almost 2/3 of maintenance hemodialysis patients die within five years of commencing dialysis treatment. Although patients on the waitlist having less severe comorbidities than their non-listed counterparts, the death rate remains high while it can take years for an organ donation. In patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing maintenance hemodialysis an “obesity paradox” has been consistently reported, i.e., a high BMI is incrementally associated with better survival. Overweight and obesity are highly prevalent in patients at the time of kidney transplantation. Indeed, most transplant centers in US may suspend wait-listing of obese patients with a BMI above 30 or 35 kg/m2 and refer them for weight reduction procedures such as bariatric surgery as a contingency for the transplant surgery. The effect of pre- and post-transplant obesity in kidney transplanted patients on long-term graft and patient survival has not been well established. We have reviewed and summarized salient recent data pertaining to body composition and clinical outcomes about the association of survival and body composition in transplant-waitlisted dialysis patients and kidney transplanted recipients. ]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Association between complications of percutaneous kidney biopsy and histological diagnosis ]

FISI Viktória, MAZÁK István, DEGRELL Péter, HALMAI Richárd, MOLNÁR Gergő A., FEHÉR Eszter, NÉMETH Kinga, PINTÉR István, KOVÁCS Tibor, WITTMANN István

[Background: Percutaneous renal biopsy is an essential tool in diagnosis and prognosis of renal diseases. It is well-known that this method has potential complications. The connection between complication occurrence related to renal biopsies and histological diagnoses of the biopsy specimen was analyzed in the present study. We also analyzed the distribution of diagnoses in our population. Methods: In this retrospective survey, 353 patients undergoing renal biopsy was studied. Biopsies were performed after marking the site of puncture with ultrasound imaging. Influence of diagnoses and clinical parameters on complications was evaluated. Results: We found a complication rate of 44.5%. In patients with diabetic nephropathy (likelihood ratio (LR) 0.44) or acute tubular necrosis (LR 0.38) a significantly lower rate of complications was found, while patients with thin basement membrane syndrome had more than 6-fold higher risk for evolvement of intrarenal haemorrhage. Patients with acute interstitial nephritis (LR 3.18) or vasculitis (LR 2.88) have a more than 2-fold risk for arteriovenous shunts while in patients with severe arteriosclerosis the occurrence of this complication was lower (LR 0.46). In rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis, arteriovenous shunts evolved also in a significantly higher rate. Conclusion: Patients with vasculitis, rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis, thin basement membrane syndrome or acute interstitial nephritis should be monitored more carefully after renal biopsy due to the significantly higher risk for complications. ]

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Dear Reader! Greetings to the 30th anniversary of founding the LAM]

KAPÓCS Gábor

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Second game, 37th move and Fourth game 78th move]

VOKÓ Zoltán

[What has Go to do with making clinical decisions? One of the greatest intellectual challenges of bedside medicine is making decisions under uncertainty. Besides the psychological traps of traditionally intuitive and heuristic medical decision making, lack of information, scarce resources and characteristics of doctor-patient relationship contribute equally to this uncertainty. Formal, mathematical model based analysis of decisions used widely in developing clinical guidelines and in health technology assessment provides a good tool in theoretical terms to avoid pitfalls of intuitive decision making. Nevertheless it can be hardly used in individual situations and most physicians dislike it as well. This method, however, has its own limitations, especially while tailoring individual decisions, under inclusion of potential lack of input data used for calculations, or its large imprecision, and the low capability of the current mathematical models to represent the full complexity and variability of processes in complex systems. Nevertheless, clinical decision support systems can be helpful in the individual decision making of physicians if they are well integrated in the health information systems, and do not break down the physicians’ autonomy of making decisions. Classical decision support systems are knowledge based and rely on system of rules and problem specific algorithms. They are utilized widely from health administration to image processing. The current information revolution created the so-called artificial intelligence by machine learning methods, i.e. machines can learn indeed. This new generation of artificial intelligence is not based on particular system of rules but on neuronal networks teaching themselves by huge databases and general learning algorithms. This type of artificial intelligence outperforms humans already in certain fields like chess, Go, or aerial combat. Its development is full of challenges and threats, while it presents a technological breakthrough, which cannot be stopped and will transform our world. Its development and application has already started also in the healthcare. Health professionals must participate in this development to steer it into the right direction. Lee Sedol, 18-times Go world champion retired three years after his historical defeat from AlphaGo artificial intelligence, be­cause “Even if I become the No. 1, there is an entity that cannot be defeated”. It is our great luck that we do not need to compete or defeat it, we must ensure instead that it would be safe and trustworthy, and in collaboration with humans this entity would make healthcare more effective and efficient. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

Neuroscience highlights: Main cell types underlying memory and spatial navigation

KRABOTH Zoltán, KÁLMÁN Bernadette

Interest in the hippocampal formation and its role in navigation and memory arose in the second part of the 20th century, at least in part due to the curious case of Henry G. Molaison, who underwent brain surgery for intractable epilepsy. The temporal association observed between the removal of his entorhinal cortex along with a significant part of hippocampus and the developing severe memory deficit inspired scientists to focus on these regions. The subsequent discovery of the so-called place cells in the hippocampus launched the description of many other functional cell types and neuronal networks throughout the Papez-circuit that has a key role in memory processes and spatial information coding (speed, head direction, border, grid, object-vector etc). Each of these cell types has its own unique characteristics, and together they form the so-called “Brain GPS”. The aim of this short survey is to highlight for practicing neurologists the types of cells and neuronal networks that represent the anatomical substrates and physiological correlates of pathological entities affecting the limbic system, especially in the temporal lobe. For that purpose, we survey early discoveries along with the most relevant neuroscience observations from the recent literature. By this brief survey, we highlight main cell types in the hippocampal formation, and describe their roles in spatial navigation and memory processes. In recent decades, an array of new and functionally unique neuron types has been recognized in the hippocampal formation, but likely more remain to be discovered. For a better understanding of the heterogeneous presentations of neurological disorders affecting this anatomical region, insights into the constantly evolving neuroscience behind may be helpful. The public health consequences of diseases that affect memory and spatial navigation are high, and grow as the population ages, prompting scientist to focus on further exploring this brain region.

Clinical Neuroscience

[A case of destructive cervical spondylarthropathy related to chronic dialysis]

BERTA Balázs, KOMÁROMY Hedvig, SCHWARCZ Attila, KAJTÁR Béla, BÜKI András, KUNCZ Ádám

[A case of a 61-year-old male patient suffered chronic renal failure and dialysed for 23 years with destructive cervical spondylarthropathy is presented. The patient presented with sudden onset of cervical pain radiating into his shoulders without neurological deficits. CT and MRI of the cervical and thoracic spine revealed severe destructive changes and compressive fractures of C6 and C7 vertebrae which caused the narrowing of the nerve root canals at these levels. A 360-degree fixation was performed to treat the unstable fracture and the patient’s pain (C6 and C7 corpectomy, autolog bone graft replacement of the two vertebral bodies, anterior plate fixation and posterior instrumentation with screws and rods). Postoperatively the patient had no significant pain, no neurological deficit and he was able to manage independent life himself. During the immediate follow-up CT of the neck showed the satisfactory position of the bone graft and the metal implantations. The 6 months follow-up CT revealed the anterior migration of the two screws from the Th1 vertebral body and 2 mm ventral elevation of the caudal end of the plate from the anterior surface of the Th1 vertebral body. The 1-year follow-up could not be performed because the patient died due to cardio-pulmonary insufficiency. This is the second Hungarian report of a chronic dialysis related severe spondylarthropathy which may cause pathologic fractures of the vertebral bodies. The typical radiological and histological findings are discussed. This disease affect patients’ quality of life and the conservative treatment alone seems to be ineffective in most cases. Based on the literature and personal experiences, the authors suggest 360-degree fixation of the spine to provide sufficient stability for the vertebrae of ”bad bone quality”, and early mobilisation of the patient can be achieved.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Myasthenia gravis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, or both?

ERDOGAN Cagdas, TEKIN Selma, ÜNLÜTÜRK Zeynep, GEDIK Korkut Derya

Myasthenia gravis (MG) and Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) are autoimmune disorders that may cause weakness in the extremities. The coexistence of MG and GBS in the same patient has rarely been reported previously. A 52-year-old male presenting with ptosis of the left eye that worsened with fatigue, especially toward evening, was evaluated in our outpatient department. His acetylcholine receptor antibody results were positive, supporting the diagnosis of MG. His medical history revealed a post-infectious acute onset of weakness in four extremities, difficulty in swallowing and respiratory failure, which was compatible with a myasthenic crisis; however, his nerve conduction studies and albuminocytologic dissociation at the time were compatible with GBS. With this case report, we aimed to mention this rare coincidental state, discuss possible diagnoses and review all other similar cases in the literature with their main features.