Hypertension and nephrology

[New development in the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of IgA nephropathy]

NAGY Judit, VAS Tibor, KOVÁCS Tibor

DECEMBER 20, 2016

Hypertension and nephrology - 2016;20(06)

[IgA nephropathy is one of the leading cause of primary glomerulonephritis worldwide. IgA nephropathy is regarded as an immune mediated disease with a multi-hit pathogenesis starting with the production of poorly glycosylated IgA1 and glycan-specific IgG and IgA autoantibodies leading to the formation of IgA1 containing immune complexes. These immune complexes deposit in the glomerular mesangium followed by the onset of mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis. The disease has variable clinical presentation and outcome. There is a need to identify patients who have the potential to progress to end-stage renal disease with the help of clinical, histological and biological markers. Treatment options for IgA nephropathy are largely based on opinion or weak evidence. It is true for the KDIGO Clinical Practice Guideline for Glomerulonephritis treatment recommendations containing low level of evidence for almost all recommendations related to IgA nephropathy. It is suggested to separate the patients into 3 groups on the basis of risk to progression and to give not-specific supportive treatment (especially angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blocking agents) to all of them on the basis of the risk factors. We discuss the recommendations of the KDIGO Guideline about steroid and immunosuppressive treatment for moderate and high risk patients. Lastly, we provide our perspective on the existing other treatment options (tonsillectomy etc.) and on ongoing clinical trials.]

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