Hypertension and nephrology

[Dialysis in Hungary: 2003-2009]

KULCSÁR Imre, SZEGEDI János, LADÁNYI Erzsébet, TÖRÖK Marietta, TÚRI Sándor, KISS István

OCTOBER 20, 2010

Hypertension and nephrology - 2010;14(05)

[The authors show the data of Hungarian dialysis statistics from 2003 to 2009. The questionnaire-based data collection was made by the Dialysis Committee of the Hungarian Society of Nephrology. The number of all patients entered in the dialysis program increased by 45.2% over six years (an average of 7.5% per year) and the number of new ones increased by 51.2% (8.5% per year). The increase in number of patients treated with haemodialysis was 39% (6.5% per year) in this period. The increase in the number of patients in the peritoneal dialysis program was extremely high: 80.6% (an average of 13.4% per year). The population incidence of new dialysed patients was 332/1 million in 2003 and 483/1 million in 2009. The population point prevalence at the end of the year was 437/1 million in 2003, but 607/1 million in 2009. The penetrance of peritoneal dialysis was 12.8% in 2009. Differences exist among the regions of Hungary in the number of patients, the penetrance of peritoneal dialysis and the prevalence of renal replacement therapies. Among patients suffering in conditions which lead to end stage renal disease the proportion of patients with diabetic or hypertensive nephropathies is increasing and the proprtion of patients with glomerular or tubulointerstitial damage is decreasing. The number (and rate) of the elderly people is growing continuously year by year. The rate of patients on waiting list for renal transplantation is decreasing (the rate was 20% in 2003, but only 10.7% in 2009). There is also a slow decrease in the number of the annual renal transplantations. The mortality rate of chronically dialysed patients shows a little increase. Five dialysis centres for paediatric patients and 58 for adults have been functioning in Hungary by the end of 2009. In average 106 patients have been treated by each Hungarian dialysis centre in contrast to the optimal of 60 persons. The number of nephrologists increased between 2003 and 2007, but slightly decreased since then. The case is similar regarding nephrological nurses.]

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Hypertension and nephrology

[The role of vitamin D receptor and the risk reducing effect of vitamin D receptor agonists in chronic kidney disease]

KISS István, KULCSÁR Imre, BARABÁS Noémi, KERKOVITS Lóránt

[Vitamin D3 is produced in the skin and is modified in the liver and kidney to the active metabolite form, 1,25-dyhydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol). Calcitriol binds to a nuclear receptor, the vitamin D receptor (VDR), and activates processes that bind to vitamin D. The classical effects of vitamin D receptor activator or agonist (VDRA) therapy for the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism in patients with chronic kidney disease primarily involves suppressive effects on the parathyroid gland, and regulation of calcium and phosphorus absorption in the intestine an mobilization in bone. Several VDR agonists have been developed for the treatment of osteoporosis, hyperparathyroidism secondary to chronic kidney disease (CKD), and psoriasis. Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) is a common and serious consequence of CKD. SHPT is a complex condition characterized by a decline in 1,25-dihidroxi vitamin D and consequent VDR activation, abnormalities in serum calcium and phosphorus levels, parathyroid gland hyperplasia, elevated parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion, and systemic mineral and bone abnormalities. There are three classes of drug used for treatment of SHPT (non-selective and selective VDR activators, and calcimimetics). Observational studies in hemodialysis patients report improved cardiovascular and allcause survival among those received VDRA therapy compared with those not on VDRA therapy. The survival benefits of selective VDRA paricalcitol appear to be linked to "non classical" action of VDRA, possibly through VDRA-mediated modulation of gene expression. VRDAs are reported to have beneficial effects such as anti-inflammatory and antithrombotic effects, inhibition of vascular calcification and stiffening, inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, and regression of left ventricular hypertrophy. VDRA are also reported to negatively regulate the renin-angiotensin system, which plays a key role in hypertension, myocardial infarction and stroke. Data from epidemiological, preclinical and clinical studies have shown that vitamin D and/or 25(OH) vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The selective VDR agonists are associated direct protective effects on glomerular architecture and antiproteinuric effects in response to renal damage. Emerging evidence suggest that VDR plays important roles in modulating cardiovascular, immunological, metabolic and other function. Paricalcitol may prove to have a substantial beneficial effect on cardiac disease and its outcome in patients with CKD.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Recent developments in the diagnosis and therapy of haemolytic uremic syndrome. Part 1: Diagnosis and initial therapy]

PROHÁSZKA Zoltán, SZILÁGYI Ágnes, SZABÓ Melinda Zsuzsanna oh., RÉTI Marienn, REUSZ György

[In this summary an overview is offered on the recent developments of the investigation and the treatment of hemolytic uremic syndrome. Based on the recent developments in the understanding of the pathogenesis and on the novel diagnostics there is an increasing ability to identify the etiology of specific diagnostic sub-groups of the disease. This molecular etiology-based classification and sub-group diagnosis has substantial influence on the short-term and long-term management of the affected patients. The first part of our review focuses on the steps of first and second line diagnosis and the selection between available therapeutic options, and provides flow-charts for the daily work. The various aspects of the long-term management and disease monitoring in hemolytic uremic syndrome will be reviewed in a second article in the future.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Biosimilar erythropoietins in nephrology - benedictio seu maledictio?]

KISS István

[Biological medicines of protein or polypeptide origin produced with biotechnology are far more complex in structure than the low molecular weight chemical ones. In conjunction with chemical drugs generic copies are completely the same, while in the field of biological medicines only similarity can be stated, as identical molecules cannot be produced. Spatial structure, isomers and side chains cause difference and for this reason these are called biosimilar drugs. Immunogenity of biosimilar drugs is very different and the risk of antibody production against them is diverse. Pure red cell aplasia, a rare side effect of erythropoietins is a life-threatening condition so every effort must be done for its prevention. Biosimilar drugs are not to be replaced with each other, and even the reference drugs should not be substituted in order to identify easily the side effects of each drug. Importantly financing should support these clinical principles namely a cheaper drug could be started as a new treatment but a former treatment should not be replaced because of cost sensitivity. It is important to provide the availability of the very expensive biologically active drugs to each patient but it is acceptable that the treatment should be as cost-effective as possible. Similarly to the generic copy program of chemical drugs biosimilar drugs are also important for the clinical practice, however their use needs appropriate regulation and farmacovigilance.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Chronic kidney disease and atherosclerosis]

REIBER István

[Accelerated cardiovascular disease is a frequent complication of chronic kidney disease. Chronic kidney disease promotes hypertension and dyslipidaemia, which in turn can contribute to the progression of renal failure. Diabetic nephropathy is a leading cause of renal failure. Hypertension, dyslipidaemia and diabetes together are the major risk factors of the development of endothelial dysfunction and progression of atherosclerosis. Inflammatory mediators are often elevated and the renin-angiotensin system is frequently activated in chronic kidney disease. Promoters of calcification are increased and inhibitors are reduced, which favors vascular calcification, an important cause of vascular injury associated with end-stage renal disease. Accelerated atherosclerosis will then lead to increased prevalence of coronary artery disease, heart failure, stroke and peripheral arterial disease.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Kidney transplantation in Hungary, 2010]

LANGER Róbert, TORONYI Éva

[Hungarian kidney transplantation has been established with three milestone operations. In 1902 Emerich Ullmann showed the technical feasibility of renal transplantation on dogs, and later the living donor transplant of András Németh in 1962 and the program starting operation of Ferenc Perner in 1973 already meant the real possibility for Hungarian patients. More than 5000 kidney transplantations were done since, and the operations are now made at the four university medical schools centers. In 2009 248 renal transplantations were done in our country (Budapest: 148, Szeged: 51, Pécs: 39, Debrecen: 34), from which 24 were living donor and nine combined kidney-pancreas cases. Despite the worsening financing situation in the health care system the numbers of transplantations are stable within a 15 year period, but this means a marked decrease in international comparison. In our country, the ratio of living donation is low, there is no paired donation, incompatible transplantation, the problems of hypersensitive patients are unresolved, and there is no old-for-old program. The solution to all of these problems could be joining to Eurotransplant, which is the definite wish of the transplant society based on the positive Slovenian and Croatian examples.]

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Hypertension and nephrology

[Prominents in Hungarian nephrology Professor Gyula Petrányi (1912-2000). Part II]

SZALAY László

[A nation can only survive and keep its identity through its traditions. This is why the initiative to launch this series coming from professor János Radó is worthy of attention. Gyula Petrányi is an outstanding personality in 20th century internal medicine, to be more precise in nephrology and immunology, his activity being wide-ranging. The first part of the current summary of his work deals with a tribute to his personality, and his role in immunomodularity treatment in glomerulonephritis. The second part shall cover his role in spreading renal biopsy, screening and caring kidney patients, dialysis, in developing kidney patients’ care, furthermore in clinicopharmacology and renal transplantation.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Covid-19 and the kidney]

PATÓ Éva, DEÁK György

[Covid-19 pandemy has emerged from Wuhan, China in December 2019. The infection affects not only the lung but other organs such as the kidney, as well. The relation between Covid-19 infection and the kidney is bidirectional. On one hand, Covid-19 infection may cause kidney damage in 50-75% of the cases resulting in proteinuria, haematuria and acute kidney injury (AKI). The etiology of AKI is multifactorial. Main pathogenic mechanisms are direct proximal tubular cell damage, sepsis-related haemodinamic derangement, citokine storm and hypercoagulability. The virus enters proximal tubular cells and podocytes via the ACE2 receptor followed by multiplication in the lysomes and consequential cell lesion. Histopathology shows acute tubular necrosis and acute tubulointerstitial nephritis. AKI is a strong predictor of mortality in critically ill patients. On the other hand, the risk of Covid-19 infection and mortality is substantially increased in patients with chronic kidney disease – especially in those with a kidney transplant or on dialysis – due to their immunocompromised status. Among haemodialysis patients, infection may spread very easily due to the possibility of getting contacted in the ambulance car or at the dialysis unit. The mortality rate of patients on renal replacement therapy with Covid-19 infection is 20-35%. In order to avoid mass infection it is obligatory to employ preventive measures and implement restricions along with (cohors) isolation of infected patients. In Hungary, every dialysis or kidney transplant patient with Covid-19 infection should be admitted to dedicated Covid-19 wards.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Association of body composition and mortality in patients on maintenance dialysis and on waitlist and after kidney transplantation]

UJSZÁSZI Ákos, KALANTAR-ZADEH Kamyar, MOLNÁR Miklós Zsolt

[Overweight [body mass index (BMI) = 25-30 kg/m2] and obesity (BMI ≥30 kg/m2) are epidemic in both developed and developing countries. Obesity has been recognized as risk factor for the development and progression of chronic kidney disease and is associated with increased cardiovascular risk and poor survival. Almost 2/3 of maintenance hemodialysis patients die within five years of commencing dialysis treatment. Although patients on the waitlist having less severe comorbidities than their non-listed counterparts, the death rate remains high while it can take years for an organ donation. In patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing maintenance hemodialysis an “obesity paradox” has been consistently reported, i.e., a high BMI is incrementally associated with better survival. Overweight and obesity are highly prevalent in patients at the time of kidney transplantation. Indeed, most transplant centers in US may suspend wait-listing of obese patients with a BMI above 30 or 35 kg/m2 and refer them for weight reduction procedures such as bariatric surgery as a contingency for the transplant surgery. The effect of pre- and post-transplant obesity in kidney transplanted patients on long-term graft and patient survival has not been well established. We have reviewed and summarized salient recent data pertaining to body composition and clinical outcomes about the association of survival and body composition in transplant-waitlisted dialysis patients and kidney transplanted recipients. ]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[The patients with sensory system impairment in peritoneal dialysis]

VARGANÉ SZABÓ Tünde, KERESZTESI Sándor

[The sensory system is responsible for perceiving information, which enables us to connect with the outside world. Its impairment could limit an individual’s chances to an equal role in society. Introduction of a special training programme that provides equal opportunities for patients with disabilities to participate in the peritoneal dialysis (PD) programme. In visually impaired patients training was not based on the visual teaching aids but on verbal communication (constant repetition, questioning). In patients with hearing loss visualisation and dexterity are in focus. Speech impediment, a condition often coexisting with hearing loss, made communication more difficult; therefore the training is built on writing, articulation and sign language. By acquiring the theoretical and technical bases of PD treatment, our patients is able to complete safe solution exchanges in their own homes. Once self-care treatment commenced, their nursing continued on an individual basis. Self-care treatment of PD patients with sensory impairment requires prudence, adequate training and aftercare; however according to our experience it does not necessarily imply a higher occurrence rate of complications. ]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[The importance of serum albumin level in patients with chronic renal disease on maintenance dialysis]

TÓTH Csitkovicsné Tünde, SZAKÁCS Gyuláné, KULCSÁR Imre

[The aim of the study: Evaluation of changes in serum albumin levels and their effects on mortality in chronic haemodialyzed (HD) population. Material and Methods: We analysed the serum albumin values and survival in 253 HD patients, in a retrospective observational study. Data were analyzed using Spearman-correlation, Cox-modell, endpoint analysis and Kaplan-meier analysis. Results: We did not find any significant correlation between serum albumin levels and gender or basic diseases, but the median serum albumin level was lower in patients with ages 65 years or older than in younger ones, and had decreased until observational period (5.4±3.0 years). Lower the serum albumin level the risk of mortality was higher (if the serum albumin level was <35 g/L versus >40 g/L), the HR was 5.69. Conclusions: The serum albumin level is a main indicator of the nutrition in dialyzed patients, but the target level would be different in older and younger patients. The serious malnutrition (lower serum albumin level) increases the risk of mortality in haemodialyzed patients.]