Hypertension and nephrology

[Accredited Postgraduate Training]

FEBRUARY 20, 2019

Hypertension and nephrology - 2019;23(01)

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Hypertension and nephrology

[Letter to our Readers]

KÉKES Ede, ALFÖLDI Sándor

Hypertension and nephrology

[Statins for elderly people, in primary prevention?]

BAJNOK László

[In a recent, retrospective cohort study, statin usage in primary prevention was found being not beneficial for patients (i) without diabetes over 75 years of age, and (ii) with diabetes over 85 years of age (75-84 years total mortality of diabetics was also lower). These findings are in sharp contrast to the two outstanding, double-blind, placebo controlled, randomized, a primary prevention studies done with rosuvastatin. Of these, 50% reduction in LDL-C in JUPITER was associated with a 50% reduction in risk and 25% reduction in LDL-C in HOPE-3 with 25% reduction in risk. Furthermore, subgroup analyzes did not indicate lower efficacy for the elderly. The recommendation of the European Atherosclerosis Society for primary preventions of the elderlies recommending consideration of statin use in these cases (Class IIa) is particularly relevant, especially in the presence of other risk factors such as hypertension. In the primary prevention lipid treatment, we can see quite clearly till 75 years of age and hopefully, we will even further after learning about the results of STAREE, a study that is designed to elderly and in which 40 mg atorvastatin is applied.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[The importance of statin therapy in hypertension]

PARAGH György, PÁLL Dénes

[Hypertension and hypercholesterolaemia often co-occur and promote early cardiovascular disease. Previous studies have shown that antihypertensive treatment may be more effective if LDL cholesterol is also reduced. This may be due to the increased expression of angiotensin-1 receptor in hypercholesterolaemia, which increases peripheral vascular resistance through angiotensin-2, and adversely affects endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Other authors indicate that high cholesterol levels increase the production of angiotensin-2 through the activation of the chymase system. High cholesterol levels increase the amount of circulating oxidized LDL which binds to the transmembrane oxidized LDL receptor (LOX- 1) also activates the angiotensin-1 receptor. In addition, angiotensin-2 has an effect on intracellular cholesterol synthesis by enhancing the key enzyme of the synthesis of intracellular cholesterol, HMG-CoA reductase. The authors present the studies that support cholesterol lowering can contribute to lowering blood pressure and other major meta-analyses in which the beneficial effects of cholesterol lowering and lipid lowering on blood pressure reductions were not proven. In the background, it may well be that these studies are not designed to evaluate the effect of cholesterol-lowering drugs on hypertension in patients with hypercholesterolaemia, and non-statin-treated patients are not randomized.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Sexual problems in CKD – a narrative review]

TÖRÖK Marietta, JÖRGEN Hegbrant, GIOVANNI Strippoli

[Sexual dysfunction is highly prevalent in patients with CKD, especially those receiving dialysis. Given the high prevalence of sexual problems in CKD patients, there has been growing interest in finding effective treatments for sexual dysfunction. PDE5i and zinc have been found promising interventions for treating sexual dysfunction in men with CKD in a systematic review of RCTs, but the evidence supporting their routine use in CKD patients is limited. In the Collaborative Depression and Sexual Dysfunction (CDS) Study, over a cohort of 1611 men in hemodialysis, 83% reported erectile dysfunction and 47% reported severe erectile dysfunction, with depression strongly correlated to this problem. Similarly, sexual dysfunction was highly prevalent in women undergoing hemodialysis. Of the 659 respondents, 555 (84%) reported sexual dysfunction and more than half of sexually active women reported sexual dysfunction, associated with age, depressive symptoms, menopause, low serum albumin, and diuretic therapy.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Investigation of Diastolic Dysfunction and its Association with Complications in Hypertensive Patients ]

HATI Krisztina, POÓR Ferenc, VÁRALLYAY Zoltán

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Lege Artis Medicinae

[Education and psychological support of parents in cases of postnatally detected Down syndrome]

MÁTÉ Orsolya, KÍVÉS Zsuzsanna, OLÁH András, FULLÉR Noémi, PAKAI Annamária

[OBJECTIVE - Since the 60’s several publications dealt with the phenomenon how physicians inform parents of newborns about postnatal recognition of Down’s syndrome and the support they receive right after breaking the bad news. Howe - ver, the rest of these studies concentrated on surveying parental satisfaction, while relatively few international studies deal with the other side of the communicational situation, the opinion of the informer. Our study focused on the circumstances of parental information in Hungarian institutions of obstetrics in order to evaluate the possibilities for interventions. METHODS - The Down’s team operating at the University of Pécs Faculty of Health Sciences carried out a national survey in 2005 - an interview-based questionnaire filled by physicians of institutions of obstetrics - with the help of the National Register for Congenital Diseases of the National Centre for Epidemiology and Down’s Foun dation. RESULTS - The coverage of the survey reached 74%. Rest of the surveyed institutions did not have information protocol, however, 70% of them believes it would be necessary. Only 44% of the physicians received communication training and 81% of them believe they can manage communication, 33% have felt that the mother of a newborn with Down’s syndrome would expect special help that the institutions are unable to provide. CONCLUSION - There are serious problems with the circumstances of parental informing in Hungarian institutions of obstetrics. This situation would obviously require intervention. An aimed communicational training based on international experience and exploiting the openness of physicians, as well as the establishment of information protocol could be elements of such intervention.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Relationship between Status Epilepticus Severity Score and etiology in adult NCSE patients

GENC Fatma, ERDAL Abidin, AKCA Gizem, KARACAY Ertan, GÖKSU Özaydın Eylem, KUTLU Gülnihal, GÖMCELI Bicer Yasemin

Purpose - Nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) is a heterogeneous, severe neurological disorder of different etiologies. In this study, the outcomes of NCSE episodes was assessed in a large series of adult patients. Our objective was to evaluate relationship between Status Epilepticus Severity Score (STESS) and etiology and the role of etiological factors on predicting the outcomes. Method - In this retrospective study, the medical records of 95 patients over 18 years of age who were diagnosed with NCSE between June 2011 and December 2015 were reviewed. Their treatment and follow-up for NCSE was performed at the Epilepsy Unit in Department of Neurology, Antalya Research and Training Hospital. Etiological factors thought to be responsible for NCSE episodes as well as the prognostic data were retrieved. The etiological factors were classified into three groups as those with a known history of epilepsy (Group 1), primary neurological disorder (Group 2), or systemic/unknown etiology (Group 3). STESS was retrospectively applied to patients. Results - There were 95 participants, 59 of whom were female. Group 1, Group 2, and Group 3 consisted of 11 (7 female), 54 (33 female), and 30 (19 female) patients, respectively. Of the 18 total deaths, 12 occurred in Group 2, and 6 in Group 3. The negative predictive value for a STESS score of ≤ 2 was 93.88% (+LR 2.05 95% CI: 1.44-2.9 and -LR 0.3 95% CI 0.10-0.84 ) in the overall study group. While the corresponding values for Group 1 (patients with epilepsy), Group 2 (patients with primary neurological disorder), and group 3 (patients with systemic or unknown etiology) were 100%, 92.59% (+LR 2.06 95%CI: 1.32-3.21 and -LR 0.28 95% CI 0.08-1.02 ) 83.33% (+LR 1.14 95%CI: 0.59-2.9 and -LR 0.80 95% CI 0.23-2.73). Conclusions - This study included the one of the largest patients series ever reported in whom STESS, a clinical scoring system proposed for use in patients with status epilepticus, has been implemented. Although STESS appeared to be quite useful for predicting a favorable outcome in NCSE patients with epilepsy and primary neurological disorders, its predictive value in patients with systemic or unknown etiology was lower. Further prospective studies including larger NCSE samples are warranted.

Clinical Neuroscience

Role of positioning between trunk and pelvis in locomotor function of ambulant children with and without cerebral palsy

SANZ-MENGIBAR Manuel Jose, SANTONJA-MEDINA Fernando

Purpose - To understand if children with and without cerebral palsy share the same lumbar postural control threshold on the sagittal plane for the transition between each walking locomotor stage. Method - Observational analysis of sagittal trunk-pelvis kinematics of 97 children with cerebral palsy and 73 with typical development, according to their locomotor stage. Results - Among children with typical development, all average and minimum measurements of the sagittal lumbar curve during the gait events were correlated with age and the locomotor stages of development. Among children with cerebral palsy, there were significant correlations between all average and minimum values of the sagittal lumbar curve and locomotor stages of development but not age. Conclusions - We conclude that, for the same locomotor level, there are no common postural patterns between children with typical development and those with spastic bilateral cerebral palsy for the position between trunk and pelvis in the sagittal plane. Maximal lordosis reduction between trunk and pelvis may change with age or even training, but does not make a positive effect on the locomotor level, while basal and maintenance capacities could explain locomotor function. Trials that failed to assess quality of movement may now have a better understanding of how different interventions improve posture towards the next functional level.

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Postgraduate conference on hepatology]

TELEGDY László

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[Survey of patient education among patients with hip arthroplasty]

BÉKÉS Brigitta, KIRÁLY Edit, BALOGH Zoltán

[Aim of the study: To analyse the training level of patients underwent hip replacement therapy in different periods of their health care. Methods: Traumatology and orthopaedic departments, ambulances and musculoskeletal rehabi-litations took part in the research. A self-made questionnaire was distributed among doctors and health professionals who cured these patients directly. The received data was analysed with the IBM SPSS Statistics 20. program. ANOVA test, 2-sample T-test and Chi-squared test were applied to analyse the coherences. P<0,05 was defined as the value of the significance limit. Results: 86 health care professionals participated in the survey. The overwhelming majority of them (45%) reported that unstructured, postoperative patient education was characteristic. Their education was dominated by communication techniques (n=68), while among the instrumental methods the use of information leaflets was dominated (n=13). Their activity was limited by the time lag and work overload (76%). Analysing the training levels, it was found that information about lifestyle changes and post-operative mobilization was significantly underused. Conclusion: Significant insufficiency were found in the education of the patients in terms of organization, and in the teaching methods and topics which were further aggravated by the mentioned hindering factors. ]