Hungarian Radiology

[The radiohygienic aspects of the interventional radiology]

PELLET Sándor, GICZI Ferenc, GÁSPÁRDY Géza, TEMESI Alfréda

MARCH 20, 2007

Hungarian Radiology - 2007;81(01-02)

[Interventional radiology is a relatively new and very rapidly developing cost-effective branch of radiology. Its aim to help or to replace surgical procedures and interventions in many cases are life saving, which are performed by imaging modality control (most commonly angiography or fluoroscopy). During interventional radiological procedures the exposure of staff and patients is usually higher, than in conventional radiography or fluoroscopy. Deterministic effects may also occur. The dosimetry can be carried out by film dosimetry, thermoluminescent dosimetry, DAP meters, semiconductor detectors and personal electronic dosimeter. The basis of reduction of radiation exposure is the radiation protection training. An important rule is that reduction of patient exposure is connected with reduction of staff exposure. With the use of appropriate tools and training the most injuries are avoidable.]

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Hungarian Radiology

[Teleradiology - opportunity or threat?]

PALKÓ András

[Teleradiology - as a result of recent developments in digital imaging and informatics - appears to be a technology potentially responding to many challenges in the field of diagnostic radiology. It may help in the centralization of service, in the support of emergency care, and in the more accurate diagnosis of cases requiring special skill. Outsourcing of imaging diagnostic reporting activities may solve human resource problems and may decrease wage expenditures. Nevertheless teleradiology exposes also some difficulties (human and technical aspects) which we should recognize in time for being able to protect ourselves.]

Hungarian Radiology

[dr. Erzsébet Schläffer]

LOMBAY Béla

Hungarian Radiology

[Transcranial Doppler monitoring of distal embolism during of carotid stenting]

SZIKRA Péter, VÖRÖS Erika, SZTRIHA László, SZÓLICS Alex

[INTRODUCTION - Reducing the risk of embolisation during endovascular treatment of internal carotid artery stenosis is very important. The rate of embolisation is affected by the different steps of stenting manipulation. Using transcranial Doppler equipment we studied the embolic signals during the different phases of carotid dilatation and stenting. MATERIAL AND METHOD - 50 patients (33 male, 17 female; mean age 64 years) were intraproceduraly monitorized with transcranial Doppler. Predilatation was necessary in nine cases, postdilatation was performed in 39 cases. The number of emboli were measured in seven different steps of endovascular treatment of carotid stenosis. Different type of commercial available endovascular devices were used. RESULTS - Intraprocedural embolisation was observed in every case. In different phases of carotid stenting the rate of embolisation showed marked differences in each phase of carotid stenting. Crossing the stenosis with stent delivery system were accompanied by a low rate of embolism (5.3) compared to the level during stent opening (9.16) and balloon dilatation (9.96). The highest level of embolisation was observed during predilatation (15.9) without the protection of the stent. CONCLUSIONS - We detected embolisation in all of the cases, however the number of embolic signals varied in different phases of carotid artery stenting. Embolisation can be reduced if the most dangerous steps (i.e. pre- and postdilatation) are avoided. Using TCD monitorisation the physician can be informed by the degree of embolisation that may alarm the interventionalist to perform the procedure more carefully, furthermore it can be employed during the training of carotid stenting.]

Hungarian Radiology

[2nd National Meeting of the Radiology Residents]

NAGY Endre, PALKÓ András, LOMBAY Béla

Hungarian Radiology

[The emperor’s new cloth]

LOMBAY Béla

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Hungarian Radiology

[Balloon dilatation and metallic stent placement in inferior vena cava stenosis complicating liver transplantation]

DOROS Attila, NÉMETH Andrea, HARTMANN Erika, DEÁK Pál Ákos, FEHÉRVÁRI Imre, TÓTH Szabolcs, NEMES Balázs, KÓBORI László

[INTRODUCTION - The only successful therapy for end stage liver cirrhosis is liver transplantation. The anastomotic stenosis of the inferior vena cava is rare but serious complication. In these cases surgery is a high risk procedure; therefore interventional radiological methods are recommended. PATIENTS AND METHODS - Eleven patients developed 12 caval stenosis from 365 liver transplant recipients in Budapest. One of the patients had caval stenosis again after retransplantation. Dilatation was performed with 10- 25 mm large balloon catheters in 6 cases and 6 metallic stents (12-24 mm in diameter) were implanted. All the procedures were performed via the common femoral vein. RESULTS - The success of the intervention was measured by the morphological results, clinical signs and by the changes of superior-inferior vena cava pressure gradients. Before the intervention 14 Hgmm mean pressure gradient was measured, which decreased to 8 Hgmm post intervention. Eleven patients developed renal insufficiency before treatment; this was reversible in 6 cases. One patient had impaired renal function before treatment, and later on again, after retransplantation. Three of 4 patients with renal insufficiency died in the post operative period. One stent migration was noticed prompting surgical fixation of the stent. CONCLUSION - Inferior vena cava stenosis represents a serious complication after liver transplantation, causing ascites, hydrothorax and venous congestion in the kidneys and the liver. In the critical post operative period surgery is not recommended, risking the viability of the liver and the life of the patient. Interventional radiology with balloon dilatation and stent implantation is the method of choice in these cases, primary stenting with large self expanding metallic stents is necessary in elastic stenosis caused by torsion of the anastomosis.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[NON-INVASIVE CORONARY ANGIOGRAPHY BY MULTISLICE COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY]

PRÉDA István, KERECSEN Gábor, MAUROVICH-HORVAT Pál

[This review summarizes the diagnostic spectrum, ways of application and methodological difficulties of multislice computed tomographic (MSCT) coronary angiography. The non-invasive assessment of cardiac and coronary anatomy is now possible with computed tomographic coronary angiography using the modern 16 to 64-slice technology. This technique finds its main use today in the screening of patients with moderate probability of having coronary artery disease (atypical chest pain). Its negative predictive value varies between 97% and 99%, thus, a negative result of this non-invasive outpatient procedure can reduce the possibility of coronary artery disease to the minimum. Other important diagnostic applications include the follow-up of patients with coronary artery bypass, accurate diagnosis of coronary artery anomalies, and the simultaneous examination of the heart and great vessels. The future development of the technique is directed to coronary plaque characterization, particularly the detection of vulnerable plaques. The radiation exposure is relatively low (7-13 mSv), comparable with that of invasive coronary angiography.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Current questions of quality assurance in diagnostic radiology in the light of a visit to England]

PORUBSZKY Tamás, GICZI Ferenc, BALLAY László, PELLET Sándor

[Physical-technical aspects of quality assurance in diagnostic radiology, because of its dependence on technology are of an extraordinary importance. The intention of Hungary to join EU makes at least the decrease of our lag in this respect unavoidable. Ministerial order 31/2001 (X. 3.) EüM which already came into force requires quality assurance in diagnostic radiology explicitly. This paper starts with definition of basic concepts, then outlooks shortly the history and present international situation of quality assurance in diagnostic radiology. We review preliminaries and the present situation in Hungary, including results of the National Patient Dose Assessment Programme till now. We think that the most efficient help to the initial steps of quality assurance in diagnostic radiology in Hungary may be the appropriate adaptation of experiences of the leading countries. Therefore we review experiences of one of the authors gained during visiting three medical physics centres in England in details. The following topics are discussed: legal requirements, types and levels of measurements, organizational problems, practical evaluation of measurements (including criteria of discarding equipment), patient dosimetry, personal dosimetry, mammography research, instrumentation of the radiology departments, calibration of measuring devices, questions of the so-called type testing and radiation protection training of workers.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Prevention of thrombotic complications in vascular interventional procedures]

HORVÁTH László, BATTYÁNY István, ROSTÁS Tamás, HARMAT Zoltán, BODROGI Gabriella, RADICS Éva

[Procedures of vascular interventional radiology is linked inevitably a certain amount of risk of thrombotic complications, like intimal and vascular wall injuries, increased thrombotic risk caused by the catheter itself, etc. The first approach of thrombotic prevention was achieved by acetyl salicylic acid in case of peripheral arteries, this treatment was later replaced by long-term anticoagulation. Opportunities were provided by the recognition of risky blood characteristics in relation to thrombotic complications. Consequently, a well performed preparation and premedication of the patients could reasonably decrease the risk. The most important steps are the cessation of smoking, normalization of hemoconcentration and antithrombotic premedication. Better understanding of the nature of atherosclerotic progression led to the introduction of long-term fibrinolytic inhibition therapy. In the past decades beside patients with vascular stenosis, the oncology patients are also treated by different radiological interventions, like intraarterial chemotherapy and chemoembolization. The use of several-day-long infusion represent a new challenge, the treated vessels, the lumen and the surface of the catheter must be prevented of thrombosis. For this purpose a few suitable drugs can be applied with mild anticoagulant and fibrinolytic stimulating effect. We use the sodium pentosan polysulphate.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Initial clinical experience with radio-frequency assisted percutaneous vertebral augmentation in the treatment of vertebral compression fractures]

MAROSFŐI Miklós, KULCSÁR Zsolt, BERENTEI Zsolt, GUBUCZ István, SZIKORA István

[Purpose - Percutaenous Vertebroplasty (PVP) is effective in alleviating pain and facilitating early mobilization following vertebral compression fractures. The relatively high risk of extravertebral leakage due to uncontrolled delivery of low viscosity bone cement is an inherent limitation of the technique. The aim of this research is to investigate the ability of controlled cement delivery in decreasing the rate of such complications by applying radiofrequency heating to regulate cement viscosity. Method and material - Thirty two vetebrae were treated in 28 patients as part of an Ethics Committee approved multicenter clinical trial using RadioFreqency assisted Percutaenous Vertebral Augmentation (RF-PVA) technique. This technique is injecting low viscosity polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement using a pressure controlled hydraulic pump and applying radiofrequency heating to increase cement viscosity prior to entering the vertebral body. All patients were screened for any cement leakage by X-ray and CT scan. The intensity of pain was recorded on a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and the level of physical activiy on the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) prior to, one day, one month and three months following procedure. Results - All procedures were technically successful. There were no clinical complication, intraspinal or intraforaminal cement leakage. In nine cases (29%) a small amount of PMMA entered the intervertebral space through the broken end plate. Intensity of pain by VAS was reduced from a mean of 7.0 to 2.5 and physical inactivity dropped on the ODI from 52% to 23% three months following treatment. Conclusion - In this small series controlled cement injection using RF-PVA was capable of preventing clinically hazardous extravertebral cement leakage while achieving outcomes similar to that of conventional vertebroplasty.]