Hungarian Radiology

[The future of teleradiology]

ZÖLDI Péter

DECEMBER 27, 2010

Hungarian Radiology - 2010;84(04)

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Hungarian Radiology

[The end of an era, and at the horizons of a new one]

LOMBAY Béla

Hungarian Radiology

[Lesions resembling radial scar of the breast - Is preoperative biopsy of the radial scar needed?]

SEBŐ Éva, SARKADI László, KOVÁCS Ilona, TÓTH Dezső, BÁGYI Péter

[INTRODUCTION - The radial sclerosing lesion is one of the most common benign breast lesions. It can mimic malignant tumours on mammogram in many cases. In one third of the cases invasive tumour or in situ carcinoma occur in radial sclerosing lesion, therefore surgical excision is mandatory. The aim of our work is to diagnose the malignant cases with preoperative biopsy (FNAB, core biopsy) when radial scar morphology lesion is detected in order to avoid two-step surgical procedure. PATIENTS AND METHODS - Forty-five patients were examined with the same method. In all cases of radial sclerosing morphology lesions a mammography, complementary radiograms, ultrasonography (US) and synchronous US guided FNAB and core biopsy were performed. Postoperative pathological findings were compared to the results of preoperative biopsies. RESULTS - In 6 of 45 cases (13%) malignant tumours mimicked radial scar in morphology. All of them were diagnosed preoperatively with core biopsy (B5). The FNAB was nondiagnostic (C1) in 2 patients, suspicious for malignancy (C4) in 2 patients and was positive in 2 cases (C5). Radial scars or complex sclerosing lesions were diagnosed in 39 patients preoperatively. In 28 cases (72%), malignancy was not detected with postoperative pathological examination. In 8 cases (20%) DCIS and, in 3 cases (8%), malignant tumours were found associated to radial scar. Neither FNAB nor core biopsy gave false positive results in the non-malignant group. In the patients with DCIS associated to radial scar, core biopsy proved malignancy in 5 cases and FNAB in only 1 case. In 3 cases of invasive malignant tumour associated with radial scar core biopsy was positive in 1 patient, while FNAB was negative or non-diagnostic in all of them. CONCLUSION - According to the latest publications vacuum- assisted large-core needle biopsy (VLNB) performed with 11G needle (12) is the safest procedure to justify or exclude malignancy in the radial scar. Observation would be enough in the non-malignant cases and this procedure has therapeutic potential as well. In case where these methods are not available, as in Hungary, all radial scar cases require surgical excision. Therefore, preoperative core biopsy is recommended in order to avoid a two-step surgical procedure.]

Hungarian Radiology

[The effect of the orientation of the distal femur on the correction of axis after closing-wedge high tibial osteotomy - Short-medium term radiological assessment]

PAPP Miklós, KÁROLYI Zoltán, FAZEKAS Péter, SZABÓ László, PAPP Levente, RÓDE László

[Introduction - High tibial osteotomy (HTO) is a generally accepted treatment for medial unicompartmental osteoarthritis of the knee with varus alignment. The clinical result is affected by the correction of the varus malalignment. The degree of correction appears to be dependent not only on correction performed on tibia but also on the orientation of the distal femur. The valgus orientation of the distal femur can be associated with postoperative over-correction and varus orientation of the distal femur with postoperative under-correction. Patients and methods - We performed radiological assessment of 82 knees preoperatively and after closing wedge high tibial osteotomy (CWO) in the 10th postoperative week, in the 12th postoperative month and at the time of the final follow-up (23-54 months) on a standing weight-bearing anteroposterior radiograph. Pre- and postoperatively we measured the orientation of the distal femur, described as the lateral angle between the anatomic axis of the femur and the distal articular surface of the femur (FC-FS). We subdivided the knees into 3 groups based on the orientation of the distal femur. In group A the FC-FS was 83-85° (normal orientation of the distal femur), in group B the FC-FS was £82° (valgus orientation of the distal femur) in group C the FC-FS was ³86° (varus orientation of the distal femur). Pre- and postoperatively we measured the lateral angle between the anatomic axis of the tibia and the proximal articular surface of the tibia (TP-TS) and the lateral angle between the distal articular surface of the femur and the proximal articular surface of the tibia (the articular component of the varus deformity FC-TP) in all groups. We determined the anatomical femorotibial angle (FTA) as a sum of FC-FS, TP-TS and FC-TP. Results - In the first ten postoperative weeks - with significant osseous correction happened in the three groups - the articular component also decreased significantly in groups A and B, but did not change in group C. Between the postoperative 10th and the final follow-up examinations we did not notice significant osseous correction loss in any groups. In groups A and B the articular correction loss was not significant, at the same time in group C we noted significant articular correction loss. Conclusion - At valgus orientation of the distal femur the CWO results in greater correction of the limb’s anatomical axis than the osseal correction performed on the tibia. This additional correction equals the (preoperatively unpredictable) amount of the articular correction. At varus orientation of the distal femur the CWO results in less correction of the limb’s anatomical axis than the osseal correction performed on the tibia. This difference equals the (preoperatively unpredictable) loss of articular correc- tion.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Necrotizing enterocolitis in neonatology: comparing the role of X-ray and ultrasonographic examinations]

JENEI Mónika, VÁRKONYI Ildikó, NYITRAI Anna, SZABÓ Miklós, BOKODI Géza, KIS Éva

[INTRODUCTION - The authors’ purpose was to analyse the role of abdominal ultrasonography (US) in the diagnosis of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). They have compared the sensitivity of the current standard diagnostic modalities for this clinical entity: plain abdominal radiography and abdominal US. For a more objective comparison, they created an US scale along with utilising the score system based on abdominal radiography which was published recently. PATIENTS AND METHODS - 46 out of 76 neonates having both clinical and radiological diagnosis of NEC had comparable radiographic and sonographic examinations between June 2006 and October 2009. The authors created a 10-grade US score system, in which sonographic signs of NEC are listed in order of severity, corresponding, where possible with the radiographic scale that was available. The findings were scored individually, then the distribution of scores and their relationship to each other were analysed. For further analysis four groups of severity based on the scores were created with the following categories: mild, moderate, severe and very severe. After graphical representation of the groups, the relationship of the groups created on the basis of scoring the findings by the two diagnostic methods were examined. RESULTS - According to this analysis both abdominal radiographs and sonographs are suitable for diagnosing NEC, which has been justified with statistical data. When analysing the severity groups the authors proved that the two methods diverge in judging groups 3 and 4, thus severe and very severe. The distributions of severity groups formed by the two imaging modalities are different, (P<0,01); and the proportion of group 3 and group 4 is different in case of US and radiographic examinations (P=0.003). CONCLUSIONS - Abdominal sonography and radiography are equally suitable diagnostic methods for diagnosing NEC, and the two methods match each other very well. In cases of mild state, the severity of the disease was found to be the same with both methods, but US allows more sensitive differentiation of serious cases. It is very sensitive in detecting perforations, so it could play a role in determining the indication of surgery.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Surgical treatment of scoliosis: pre- and postoperative follow-up with whole-body EOS radiography]

LÉVAI Andrea, VÁRADY Edit, SZUKITS Sándor, WENINGER Csaba, BATTYÁNY István, ILLÉS Tamás

[Currently, Cotrel-Dubousset spondylodesis is the treatment of choice in orthopaedics. It allows for correction of deformity in three-dimensions allowing for stable fixation. EOS (Extended Orthopedic System) is an ultra low dose X-ray imaging system, simultaneously acquiring images of the whole body in two planes. Examinations with the EOS system is not only indicated in cases related to orthopaedics but in multiple other conditions owing to its low level of emitted radiation with rapid and cost-effective imaging. The importance of EOS examination is emphasized in systemic skeletal disorders, thus allowing itt o be used in various other clinical fields.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Consensus statement of the Hungarian Clinical Neurogenic Society about the therapy of adult SMA patients]

BOCZÁN Judit, KLIVÉNYI Péter, KÁLMÁN Bernadette, SZÉLL Márta, KARCAGI Veronika, ZÁDORI Dénes, MOLNÁR Mária Judit

[Background – Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive, progressive neuromuscular disorder resulting in a loss of lower motoneurons. Recently, new disease-modifying treatments (two drugs for splicing modification of SMN2 and one for SMN1 gene replacement) have become available. Purpose – The new drugs change the progression of SMA with neonatal and childhood onset. Increasing amount of data are available about the effects of these drugs in adult patients with SMA. In this article, we summarize the available data of new SMA therapies in adult patients. Methods – Members of the Executive Committee of the Hungarian Clinical Neurogenetic Society surveyed the literature for palliative treatments, randomized controlled trials, and retrospective and prospective studies using disease modifying therapies in adult patients with SMA. Patients – We evaluated the outcomes of studies focused on treatments of adult patients mainly with SMA II and III. In this paper, we present our consensus statement in nine points covering palliative care, technical, medical and safety considerations, patient selection, and long-term monitoring of adult patients with SMA. This consensus statement aims to support the most efficient management of adult patients with SMA, and provides information about treatment efficacy and safety to be considered during personalized therapy. It also highlights open questions needed to be answered in future. Using this recommendation in clinical practice can result in optimization of therapy.]

Clinical Neuroscience

A new method to determine the optimal orientation of Slim Modiolar cochlear implant electrode array insertion

HORVÁTH Bence, PERÉNYI Ádám, MOLNÁR Fiona Anna, CSANÁDY Miklós, KISS József Géza, ROVÓ László

Our goal was to determine the optimal orientation of insertion of the Slim Modiolar electrode and develop an easy-to-use method to aid implantation surgery. In some instances, the electrode arrays cannot be inserted in their full length. This can lead to buckling, interscalar dislocation or tip fold-over. In our opinion, one of the possible reasons of tip fold-over is unfavourable orientation of the electrode array. Our goal was to determine the optimal orientation of the Slim Modiolar electrode array relative to clear surgical landmarks and present our method in one specified case. For the measurement, we used the preoperative CT scan of one of our cochlear implant patients. These images were processed by an open source and free image visualization software: 3D Slicer. In the first step we marked the tip of the incus short process and then created the cochlear view. On this view we drew two straight lines: the first line represented the insertion guide of the cochlear implant and the second line was the orientation marker (winglet). We determined the angle enclosed by winglet and the line between the tip of the incus short process and the cross-section of previously created two lines. For the calculation we used a self-made python code. The result of our algorithm for the angle was 46.6055°. To validate this result, we segmented, from the CT scan, the auditory ossicles and the membranaceous labyrinth. From this segmentation we generated a 3D reconstruction. On the 3D view, we can see the position of the previous lines relative to the anatomical structures. After this we rotated the 3D model together with the lines so that the insertion guide forms a dot. In this view, the angle was measured with ImageJ and the result was 46.599°. We found that our method is easy, fast, and time-efficient. The surgery can be planned individually for each patient, based on their routine preoperative CT scan of the temporal bone, and the implantation procedure can be made safer. In the future we plan to use this method for all cochlear implantation surgeries, where the Slim Modiolar electrode is used.

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[Benefits of SGLT-2 inhibitors: beyond glycemic control]

BALOGH Zoltán, SIRA Lívia

[In the recent years, according to international and Hungarian guidelines, in addition to lifestyle modification, metformin is the preferred initial glucose-lowering drug for most people with type 2 diabetes, if not contraindicated. Sodium glucose co­transporter-2 inhibitors have been shown to reduce progression of chronic kidney disease, or kidney failure, as well as the risk of hospitalizations for congestive heart failure and (mainly in secondary prevention) cardiovascular death in patients with type 2 diabetes. For major adverse cardiovascular events and for the renoprotection, there seems to be no class effect. On the other hand, a class effect of sodium glucose co­transporter-2 inhibitors is evident for hospitalization for heart failure. In this review the authors summarize novel data about sodium glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors, and about their new perspectives in the near future.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Transcranial direct current stimulation in neuroscientific researches – pitfalls and solutions]

PESTHY Orsolya, JANACSEK Karolina, NÉMETH Dezső

[Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a promising brain stimulation tool which is non-invasive, easy to use and relatively cheap. Since it can change brain activity in a temporal manner, it can contribute to both clinical practice and neuroscientific research. However, the effectiveness of tDCS has been questioned considering the lack of full understanding of its mechanism of action and the seemingly contradictory results. In this review, we aim to provide a summary of potential problems and possible solutions. Our main focus is on the inter-individual differences in the effect of tDCS which can explain the noisy data, thus, controlling for them is important in order to show reliable results. This review is hoped to contribute to maximizing the potential of tDCS by helping future researchers to design replicable studies.]

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[Neurological aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic caused by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus]

BERECZKI Dániel, STANG Rita, BÖJTI Péter, KOVÁCS Tibor

[By the spring of 2020 the COVID-19 outbreak caused by the new SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus has become a pandemic, requiring fast and efficient reaction from societies and health care systems all over the world. Fever, coughing and dyspnea are considered the major signs of COVID-19. In addition to the involvement of the respiratory system, the infection may result in other symptoms and signs as well. Based on reports to date, neurological signs or symptoms appear in 30-50% of hospitalized COVID-19 patients, with higher incidence in those with more severe disease. Classical acute neurological syndromes have also been reported to associate with COVID-19. A drop in the volume of services for other acute diseases has been described in countries with healthcare systems focusing on COVID-19. During the COVID-19 epidemic it is also important to provide appropriate continuous care for those with chronic neurological disorders. It will be the task of the future to estimate the collateral damage caused by the COVID-19 epidemic on the outcome of other neurological disorders, and to screen for the possible late neurological complications of the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus infection.]