Hungarian Radiology

[The ECR 2003 Image Solving Meeting]

PALKÓ András

APRIL 20, 2003

Hungarian Radiology - 2003;77(02)

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Hungarian Radiology

[Treatment of ureter stenosis of the transplanted kidney using invasive radiological methods]

DOROS Attila, WESZELITS Viola, PUHL Mária, RUSZ András, JANSEN Judit

[INTRODUCTION - Stenosis, occlusion and necrosis of the ureter after kidney transplantation occur in 2-13%. The therapeutic choices are surgery or minimally invasive endourological and percutaneous procedures. We analysed our therapeutic plan and results using percutaneous dilatation and stenting. PATIENTS AND METHODS - The patients after kidney transplantation are regularly examined by ultrasound. In cases of suspected obstruction we perform scintigraphy and CT-urography, and if indicated, we place percutaneous nephrostomy. Between July of 2000 and September of 2002, 15 stenosis in 14 patients were dilated and stented percutaneously. RESULTS - We found one restenosis after 6 months due to compression. This patient underwent surgery, but after the operation another stenosis has developed. We treated it percutaneously. One nephrectomy had to be performed due to serious infection. In one patient stent migration occured and surgical intervention was performed. 12 patients have free urine passage and good kidney function as a result of percutaneous therapy. CONCLUSION - We have good results with percutaneous ureter dilatation and stenting, but our follow-up time (31 months) must be longer for the evaluation of long-term results. The percutaneous treatment can partly replace endourological and surgical methods or can be combined with each other.]

Hungarian Radiology

[The Swiss Syndrome]

SZÁNTÓ Dezső

Hungarian Radiology

[Recommendations on the Internet Radiology on the Internet]

BÁGYI Péter

Hungarian Radiology

[No Limits Optimism After ECR 2003]

LOMBAY Béla

Hungarian Radiology

[To Use or to Gain Profit?]

ENGLONER László

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