Hungarian Radiology

[The doyen of pediatric radiology: dr. György Köteles]

LOMBAY Béla

JUNE 20, 2002

Hungarian Radiology - 2002;76(03)

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Hungarian Radiology

[Ogilvie’s syndrome associated with excretory urography]

SZÁNTÓ Dezső, SZŰCS Gabriella

[INTRODUCTION - The Ogilvie's syndrome is a disturbance of colonic innervation with parasympathic overreaction was assumed to be cause of large bowel segment spasm and poststenotic accumulation of gas. There is no distention in small intestine. CASE REPORT - In case of a 15 years old male during excretory urography six minutes after the administration of contrast material infusion Ogilvie's syndrome had occured. On 6, 12 and 18 min. abdominal plain film were demonstrated the acute spasm and poststenotic large bowel distention by air lumenogram phenomenon in the kidneys ambilateral renal tuberculosis by the whitening-like contrast opacity arising from centre calyx (pyelotubular reflux) in right side and by clubbing of calyces in left side (daisy flower sign). Not involved the small intestine. The colonic spasm and accumulation of gas lasted approximately 6 hours and ceased without medical aid. CONCLUSION - The Ogilvie's syndrome accompanying excretory urography is a toxic effect attributing to transient injury of peripheric neures and neurovisceral synapses.]

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[Remarks from the President Elect - A debate initiating letter to the members of the Society]

PALKÓ András

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MÓZSA Szabolcs

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OSTOROS Gyula

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[Objective - To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of levetiracetam in children with drug resistant epilepsy from a retrospective study. Methods - We report the result of a study of 85 pediatric patients (mean 10.5 years, range: 1-24) with refractory generalized and focal epilepsy, who received levetiracetam as add-on treatment. The average duration of epilepsy was eight years, and the patient were treated with mean of 6.0 antiepileptic drugs befor levetiracetam was introduced. Results - Ten patients (12%) became seizuresfree, three (3%) responded with seizure reduction of more than 90%, 32 (38%) responded with seizure reduction of more than 50% following introduction of levetiracetam. No response to levetiracetam was reported in 34% (n: 29). Positive psychotopic effect was observed in 26 patient (30%). Mild to moderate side effects were reported in 11 patients (13%), consisting most frequently general behavioral changes, agression, sleep disturbances, but they ceased after decreasing the dose of levetiracetam. Mental retardation was associated with poor response and associated with more side effects. Conclusion - Levetiracetam is well tolerated new antiepileptic drug that may effectively improve seizures controll as an addon drug in resistant epilepsy in childhood with good tolerability.]

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[Ultrasound of the acute pediatric scrotum]

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[Proper evaluation of the acute scrotum, like any condition, starts with a history and physical examination by an experienced clinician. Often this is all that is needed to arrive at an accurate diagnosis, which then allows prompt and appropriate treatment. However, the true nature of the underlying disease producing scrotal pain is not always clear, and the consequences of error (testicular loss) are undesirable. Ultrasound is the single most useful imaging tool for imaging the scrotum. While nuclear medicine studies can help assess blood flow, the combination of anatomic detail provided by modern ultrasound equipment and the ability to assess blood flow and perfusion with color Doppler makes ultrasound invaluable. Properly performed and interpreted, ultrasound provides very high sensitivity and specificity for acute scrotal conditions. Understanding of the conditions that produce acute scrotal pain in children will improve one’s diagnostic abilities. The most important diagnosis to consider is testicular torsion, since untreated this will result in testicular death. While testicular torsion can occur at any age, it is most common in the perinatal and peripubertal age groups. Torsion of a testicular appendage is a frequent cause of scrotal pain in prepubertal males. The sonographic findings can mimic epididymitis, but diligent and focused sonographic examination can make the diagnosis. Epididymitis typically affects postpubertal males, but can be seen in younger patients with functional or anatomic urinary tract anomalies. Sonographic evaluation of the post-traumatic painful scrotum can help to differentiate injuries that can be managed conservatively and those that require surgery. Less common causes of scrotal pain include hernias and hydroceles, vasculitis, and idiopathic edema. Understanding the characteristic sonographic features of these conditions allows the examining physician to make more accurate and confident diagnoses. It is hoped that this review article will help to promote this understanding.]

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