Hungarian Radiology

[Surgical treatment of scoliosis: pre- and postoperative follow-up with whole-body EOS radiography]

LÉVAI Andrea, VÁRADY Edit, SZUKITS Sándor, WENINGER Csaba, BATTYÁNY István, ILLÉS Tamás

DECEMBER 27, 2010

Hungarian Radiology - 2010;84(04)

[Currently, Cotrel-Dubousset spondylodesis is the treatment of choice in orthopaedics. It allows for correction of deformity in three-dimensions allowing for stable fixation. EOS (Extended Orthopedic System) is an ultra low dose X-ray imaging system, simultaneously acquiring images of the whole body in two planes. Examinations with the EOS system is not only indicated in cases related to orthopaedics but in multiple other conditions owing to its low level of emitted radiation with rapid and cost-effective imaging. The importance of EOS examination is emphasized in systemic skeletal disorders, thus allowing itt o be used in various other clinical fields.]

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[The effect of the orientation of the distal femur on the correction of axis after closing-wedge high tibial osteotomy - Short-medium term radiological assessment]

PAPP Miklós, KÁROLYI Zoltán, FAZEKAS Péter, SZABÓ László, PAPP Levente, RÓDE László

[Introduction - High tibial osteotomy (HTO) is a generally accepted treatment for medial unicompartmental osteoarthritis of the knee with varus alignment. The clinical result is affected by the correction of the varus malalignment. The degree of correction appears to be dependent not only on correction performed on tibia but also on the orientation of the distal femur. The valgus orientation of the distal femur can be associated with postoperative over-correction and varus orientation of the distal femur with postoperative under-correction. Patients and methods - We performed radiological assessment of 82 knees preoperatively and after closing wedge high tibial osteotomy (CWO) in the 10th postoperative week, in the 12th postoperative month and at the time of the final follow-up (23-54 months) on a standing weight-bearing anteroposterior radiograph. Pre- and postoperatively we measured the orientation of the distal femur, described as the lateral angle between the anatomic axis of the femur and the distal articular surface of the femur (FC-FS). We subdivided the knees into 3 groups based on the orientation of the distal femur. In group A the FC-FS was 83-85° (normal orientation of the distal femur), in group B the FC-FS was £82° (valgus orientation of the distal femur) in group C the FC-FS was ³86° (varus orientation of the distal femur). Pre- and postoperatively we measured the lateral angle between the anatomic axis of the tibia and the proximal articular surface of the tibia (TP-TS) and the lateral angle between the distal articular surface of the femur and the proximal articular surface of the tibia (the articular component of the varus deformity FC-TP) in all groups. We determined the anatomical femorotibial angle (FTA) as a sum of FC-FS, TP-TS and FC-TP. Results - In the first ten postoperative weeks - with significant osseous correction happened in the three groups - the articular component also decreased significantly in groups A and B, but did not change in group C. Between the postoperative 10th and the final follow-up examinations we did not notice significant osseous correction loss in any groups. In groups A and B the articular correction loss was not significant, at the same time in group C we noted significant articular correction loss. Conclusion - At valgus orientation of the distal femur the CWO results in greater correction of the limb’s anatomical axis than the osseal correction performed on the tibia. This additional correction equals the (preoperatively unpredictable) amount of the articular correction. At varus orientation of the distal femur the CWO results in less correction of the limb’s anatomical axis than the osseal correction performed on the tibia. This difference equals the (preoperatively unpredictable) loss of articular correc- tion.]

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