Hungarian Radiology

[Successful international course on the imaging diagnostics of the liver; ESGAR Liver Imaging Workshop - Szeged, 18th-20th April, 2008]

HARKÁNYI Zoltán

JUNE 22, 2008

Hungarian Radiology - 2008;82(03-04)

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[16th French-Hungarian Radiological Symposium - Budapest, 16th-18th April, 2008]

– H. E. –

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[Celebrating Professor Endre Kuhn on his 80th birthday]

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