Hungarian Radiology

[Stress]

LOMBAY Béla

OCTOBER 20, 2007

Hungarian Radiology - 2007;81(05-06)

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Hungarian Radiology

[MRI-guided prostate brachytherapy: First Hungarian experiences based on a canine study]

LAKOSI Ferenc, ANTAL Gergely, VANDULEK Csaba, KOTEK Gyula, KOVÁCS Árpád, GARAMVÖLGYI Rita, PETNEHÁZY Örs, HADJIEV Janaki, BAJZIK Gábor, BOGNER Péter, REPA Imre

[INTRODUCTION - Modern radical radiotherapy can be an effective alternative of radical prostatectomy in low risk patients with prostate tumor. Our objective was to demonstrate the feasibility of transperineal MR-guided prostate interventions in an open MR unit and to present our early clinical experiences on canines. METHODS AND MATERIALS - The procedures were performed on 5 canines in an open-configuration 0.35T MR scanner. For interventions an MR compatible custom-made device was used. The canines were placed in the right lateral decubitus position. Template reconstruction, trajectory planning, target and OAR delineation were based on T2 FSE images. For image guidance and target confirmation, fast spoiled gradient-echo (FSPGR) sequence was used. MR compatible coaxial needles were inserted through the perineum to the base of the prostate. After satisfactory position was confirmed, brachytherapy catheters were placed through the coaxial needles, which were then removed. RESULTS - Mean and standard deviation of the needle displacements was 2.2 mm±1.2 mm, with a median of 2 mm. 96% of the errors were less than 4.0 mm. Implantation induced prostate motion was measured with a mean of 10.3 and 2.3 mm in cranio-caudal and transverse directions. Significant movement was only observed during the first 4 needle insertions. The average time needed for each step was: anesthesia 15 minutes, setup and positioning 15 minutes, initial imaging 15 minutes, template registration and projection 15 minutes, contouring, trajectory planning, insertion of 10 needles 60 minutes. CONCLUSION - Based on our canine model experiences our method seems to be a promising approach for performing feasible, accurate, reliable and high-quality prostate MR guidance within a reasonable time span. We plan to introduce MR-guided biopsy and brachytherapy in human patients in the near future.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Computed tomography brain perfusion in the management of acute stroke]

BAGI Róbert, SZABÓ Tünde, MONOKI Erzsébet

[INTRODUCTION - The multidetector CT-technology made the application of perfusion CT-examination in the diagnosis of vascular brain damages possible in recently. The purpose of this study was to introduce the method and to assess the importance of computed tomography brain perfusion in emergency patient care and early diagnosis of brain ischemia. PATIENTS AND METHODS - We perform brain perfusion examinations with a 2 slice multidetector computer tomography (General Electric Highspeed NX/i, 2004) in our hospital. We examined the results of native and perfusion CT of 27 patients who underwent CT brain perfusion examination during emergency patient care in our department between 2004 January and 2006 December. We also examined if the patients got systemic thrombolysation and the patients’ condition after therapy. RESULTS - The perfusion software can make quantitative colour maps of parameters (CBF, CBV, MTT) and can visualize mean value and percentil decrease of measuring parameters. There were 18 positive and 8 negative CTbrain perfusion examinations in the examined period. One examination was technically unvaluable. CONCLUSION - By measuring blood flow's decrease the CT-brain perfusion examination can separate the reversible and irreversible damage of brain parenchyma. The examination protocol of brain vascular damages are native CT-scan, postcontrast perfusion CT-examination and CTangiography by the recommendation of international literature. Despite the multidetector CT-s and CT-perfusion technic is available for years, the CT-brain perfusion examination is not a routine process in the emergency patient care in our country.]

Hungarian Radiology

[XV. Symposium and Postgradual Training of the Pediatric Radiologists]

KIS Éva

Hungarian Radiology

[XII. Congress of the Hungarian Radiographers]

TIHANYI Gyöngyi, VANDULEK Csaba

Hungarian Radiology

[“Magic photos” in Szeged]

GYENES György

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Reliability and Validity of the Turkish Version of the Brief Scales for Coping Profile in Textile Workers

ORNEK Koseoglu Ozlem, TEMEL Yavuz Guler

The aim of this study is to adapt the BSCP (Brief Scales for Coping Profile) scale to Turkish and to investigate its psychometric properties among textile workers. Methods: This a psychometric study with cross-sectional design. After translation procedures, the BSCP was administered to workers. Content validity of the BSCP was investigated with the CVI index and reliability was investigated with Cronbach’s Alpha. The construct validity was investigated with exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. Results: The psychometric properties of the original BSCP were supported by the Turkish version of the BSCP. According to the exploratory factor analysis, the BSCP had six subscales. The reliability of the BSCP subscales’ values were 0.692, 0.712, 0.661, 0.756, 0.786, and 0.777 respectively. Conclusion: The Turkish version of the BSCP showed acceptable reliability and validity which is the first adapted scale in Turkey for evaluating workers’ coping profiles. The scale will be a good option to provide basic data about workers’ coping profiles which may be used for prolonging stress management skills and health promotion programs by occupational health and psychiatric nurses, physicians, psychologist and safety experts.

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[Psychoendocrine aspects of chronic stress, depression and eating disorders]

MOLNÁR Ildikó, MOLNÁR Gábor

[The brain is not only a central organ, but also a target of stress-related events. During chronic stress, many somatic and psychiatric disorders could be initiated by the decreased allostatic or adaptive abilities of the individual. The brain is involved in the regulation of stress-related events via hormones, neuropeptides, monoamines and cytokines. A number of endocrine diseases or hormonal changes are associated with behavioural, vegetative and emotional alterations, which occasionally lead to psychological disturbances, for example depression. The endocrine background is also reflected by the medical treatment of psychiatric patients, as demonstrated by the use of selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors, and estrogen or levothyroxine substitution therapies. The psychiatric disorders presented here, such as the various forms of depression and eating disorders (anorexia and bulimia nervosa) are highlighted because of their frequencies and lifethreatening nature. By describing these disorders, we wish to aid their early diagnosis and treatment and to help incorporate them into everyday clinical practice.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Neurophobia]

SZIRMAI Imre

[Neurophobia is the fear of neurological diseases. Its main symptom is that medical students and young doctors are not able to utilize their basic neurological knowledge at the bedside. According to statistics, every second student suffers from neurophobia. This attitude could explain why in the last two decades less and less young doctors wanted to become neurologist. Medical students complain that they receive no instructions, and are afraid of loosing their interest and of facing the failure of their competency. The hardship of neurology was explained by the insufficient knowledge of anatomy and the infrequent encounter with patients. Even general practitioners have anxiety about neurological patients. The loss of interest in neurosciences seems to associate with insensitivity of human-centered culture and corruption of empathic thinking. The burnout syndrome of medical doctors and students can be explained by stress, loss of respect, permanent competition, independency that interferes with responsibility, stiff hierarchy of medical society, fear of diagnostic failures and of economical difficulties. The scores of depression in female students were higher than in male. The idea of the “good neurologist” has been changed. The business oriented care, the shortage of time, and the financial restrictions corroded the conventional practice and ceased the vocational idealism. At present, personal teaching is going to transform into impersonal multimedia learning. Because of the drastic change of values, the age of inner-oriented professionals has terminated also in the medicine. Medical doctors follow even less the traditional troll of professional behavior, but according the social demands, they choose their specialization for subsistence. The highly esteemed social status of neurologists and psychiatrists is going to sink in Europe. To reduce neurophobia it would be desirable 1. to introduce neurology training in the early years of medical school; 2. to teach neurology in all semesters, 3. to assure the effective teaching of neuro-anatomy and physiology, 4. to organize more one-to-one teacher-student communication. In the United States, residents participate in teaching during their residency training. To master neurology dedicated teachers are necessary whom neurology residents ought to meet personally with optimal frequency. However, these requirements seem to fail because of the chiefly technical characters of the actual reforms.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Unilateral thalamic infarction causing downward gaze palsy in a patient with uncorrected tetralogy of fallot: a case report

ANNUS Ádám, BENCSIK Krisztina, JÁRDÁNHÁZY Tamás, VÉCSEI László, KLIVÉNYI Péter

Introduction - Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) is the most common form of cyanotic congenital heart disease (CHD). Adults with surgically uncorrected forms of this condition are extremely rare, since operation is recommended in childhood to prevent cyanosis. Cyanotic CHD increases the risk of thromboembolic events. An endothelial dysfunction caused by chronic hypoxia and shear stress due to rheological alterations with a platelet dysfunction appear to be the explanation behind this finding. Paramedian thalamic infarction causing vertical gaze palsy without midbrain involvement is an infrequent finding. We report here a rare case of a patient with untreated TOF, who suffered a left-sided unilateral thalamic infarction presenting as downward gaze palsy and diplopia. Case presentation - A 44-year-old women complained of sudden onset diplopia and vertigo. Neurological examination revealed a downward gaze palsy with other symptoms related to a vertebrobasilar territory circulatory disturbance. The MRI scan revealed an acute infarction, 8 mm in diameter in the left medial thalamic region without midbrain involvement. Discussion - Adults with uncorrected forms of TOF are extremely uncommon, and descriptions of stroke in these patients are therefore rarities. We set out to give a concise survey of the literature regarding TOF patients with stroke. Conclusion - We present a rare case of unilateral thalamic infarction causing downward gaze palsy in an adult patient with uncorrected TOF. Cyanotic CHD is regarded as one of the risk factors of stroke. Besides other pathologic conditions, ischaemic stroke at an early age should raise the suspicion of a cardioembolic origin and, in rare cases, might result from cyanotic CHD.

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[CONTROVERSIAL EFFECTS OF NITRIC OXIDE: INTEGRITY AND TOXICITY]

KISS Róbert Gábor, BÉRES Bernát János

[Nitric oxide is a key molecule of the human body. Since its discovery, a library of books and papers have been published on its physiological and pathophysiological role. It is involved in almost all pathological processes. In healthy individuals nitric oxide plays a crucial role in the vascular regulation by protecting against atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction and stroke. In the central nervous system, nitric oxide in its function as a neurotransmitter is responsible for synaptic plasticity, long-term potentiation, memory and a number of neuroendocrine control mechanisms. Furthermore, during inflammation and host defense, macrophages and neutrophils produce nitric oxide that has antibacterial, antiviral, and tumour cell killing activity. In pathologic conditions, however, nitric oxide reacts with superoxide anion to form peroxynitrite that damages the enzymes of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, superoxide-dismutase, reduced glutathion and activates or inactivates signalling molecules. During ischaemia- reperfusion, nitric oxide and peroxynitrite contribute to nitrative/nitrosative stress, DNAfragmentation and consequent polyADP-ribosepolymerase- 1 enzyme activation both in coronary thrombosis and ischaemic stroke.]