Hungarian Radiology

[REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE]

GYENES György

OCTOBER 10, 2005

Hungarian Radiology - 2005;79(05)

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Hungarian Radiology

[Board Meeting of the Hungarian College of Radiology]

PALKÓ András, FORRAI Gábor

Hungarian Radiology

[Networks]

LOMBAY Béla

Hungarian Radiology

[The role of MRI in the clinical examination following breast cancer screening]

SZABÓ Éva, BIDLEK Mária, GŐDÉNY Mária

[INTRODUCTION - Breast cancer screening was performed in 27 325 female patients at the National Institute of Oncology from 1st of January 2002 to May 30th of 2005. Complementary examinations were necessary in 1876 women. MR-mammography was performed in 65 of these cases. We were curious about in which cases MR mammography helps to make the diagnosis more accurate, how does it influence the therapy. We also studied, whether the number of surgical interventions because of benign breast lesions decreases due to MR mammography. PATIENTS AND METHODS - In 65 patients MR mammography was performed using non-contrast axial and coronal T1W and STIR sequences. After the injection of gadolinium four series of 3D FLASH (fast low angle shot) dynamic gradiens echo sequences were also applied. Subtraction of the non-contrast and contrast enhanced series were evaluated in addition to the intensity curves of the postcontrast series. RESULTS - MR mammography helped to evaluate dense breasts in 21 cases, to identify multifocal lesions in 6 cases and to differentiate the malignant-benign processes. In the course of the 65 post-screening examinations, malignant processes [BI-RADS IV-V (Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System)] were diagnosed in 21 cases, benign processes (BI-RADS II-III) or negative results were found in 44 patients. CONCLUSION - MR mammography increased diagnostic accuracy, decreased the number of benign lesion-related surgical procedures and increased the accuracy in determining surgical radicality and establishing a therapeutic plan.]

Hungarian Radiology

[The force transmission of the distal endings of stent delivery systems]

SZIKRA Péter, VÖRÖS Erika, SZTRIHA László, SZÓLICS Alex, CSIKÁSZ Tamás

[INTRODUCTION - In cases of endovascular treatment of internal carotid artery stenosis, one of the most important aspects is to minimise embolic complications. Dislodging emboli may be influenced by the shape and size of tapered endings of stent delivery systems. Our team performed measurements and calculations on the emergence of force of the various tapered endings. MATERIAL AND METHOD - Five different commercially available stent dilivery systems were investigated. The thickness of the devices were measured and taking 5 mm normal artery diameter, the lumen size was calculated, above which the delivery system should dilate the lumen mechanically. By means of geometrical computer-constructions and measurements, we analysed the forces directed ahead and laterally, emerging on the surface of tapered endings during the passing through the stenosis. RESULTS - The stent delivery systems were between 5.0 and 5.9 F in diameter, and even the stent delivery system of lowest profile would dilate a stenosis of over 89%. The different endings are tapered with variable lengths. The force transmission on the vessel wall of different directions was distinct at the various points of the cone surfaces. The forces directed ahead were less than those directed laterally on the larger part of a cone surface. Irregularity of the cone surfaces distributed the forces unfavorably. Considering the features of tapered endings, the atraumatic introduction of the devices required a range of upper limits of stenoses between 89.76-98.04%, which are more feasible values than those deternined by shaft sizes. CONCLUSIONS - Our experimental work suggests, that the shape and size of the endings of stent delivery systems influence the forces affecting vessel wall plaques, and in this manner, embolic complications, during carotid stenting. The lowest risk of embolisation could be induced by using the longest and smoothest tapered endings.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Acromesomelic dysplasia du Pan]

KAISSI Al Ali, GHACHEM Ben Maher, CHEHIDA Ben Farid, KOZLOWSKI Kazimierz

[INTRODUCTION - Cartilage derived morphogenic protein (CDMP1) mutations account for several related disorders, ranging from prenatal lethal to very mild entities such as brachydactyly C. Two similar severe manifestations of CDMP1 mutations are du Pan and Hunter-Thompson syndromes. CASE REPORTS - We report two second degree relatives with du Pan syndrome. Clinical history and full skeletal surveys were analysed and compared with the data from the literature. Frequent spontaneous abortions - probably manifestation of the lethal forms of CDMP1 mutations - were present in both families. Skeletal surveys of the patients showed similar acromesomelic abnormalities consistent with du Pan syndrome. CONCLUSION - The rare publications of du Pan syndrome present usually insufficient radiographic documentation. Better radiographic imaging is necessary to establish clear-cut criteria of differentiation between du Pan and Hunter-Thompson syndrome.]

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[Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most frequently used pharmaceuticals. Nevertheless, a number of studies emphasized that NSAIDs were damaging not only the gastrointestinal (GI), but also the cardiovascular (CV) system, could increase the blood pressure, the frequency of coronary events (angina, myocardial infarction) and stroke incidence, as well as they might deterio­rate renal functions. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) did not find evidence that administering NSAIDs could increase the risk of developing COVID-19 or worsened the condition of COVID-19 patients. However, unwanted effects of specific drugs differ substantially in their occurrence and seriousness as well. It seemed to be for a long time that the NSAIDs provoked higher GI-risk was closely related to the COX1/COX2 selectivity, like the cardiovascular (CV) risk to the COX2/COX1 selectivity, however, the recent data did not prove it clearly. Based on the available literature while pondering the gastrointestinal and cardiovascular adverse events, among all NSAIDs the aceclofenac profile seemed to be the most favourable.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Neuroscience highlights: The mirror inside our brain

KRABÓTH Zoltán, KÁLMÁN Bernadette

Over the second half of the 19th century, numerous theories arose concerning mechanisms involved in understanding of action, imitative learning, language development and theory of mind. These explorations gained new momentum with the discovery of the so called “mirror neurons”. Rizzolatti’s work inspired large groups of scientists seeking explanation in a new and hitherto unexplored area of how we perceive and understand the actions and intentions of others, how we learn through imitation to help our own survival, and what mechanisms have helped us to develop a unique human trait, language. Numerous studies have addressed these questions over the years, gathering information about mirror neurons themselves, their subtypes, the different brain areas involved in the mirror neuron system, their role in the above mentioned mechanisms, and the varying consequences of their dysfunction in human life. In this short review, we summarize the most important theories and discoveries that argue for the existence of the mirror neuron system, and its essential function in normal human life or some pathological conditions.

Clinical Neuroscience

Neuroscience highlights: Main cell types underlying memory and spatial navigation

KRABOTH Zoltán, KÁLMÁN Bernadette

Interest in the hippocampal formation and its role in navigation and memory arose in the second part of the 20th century, at least in part due to the curious case of Henry G. Molaison, who underwent brain surgery for intractable epilepsy. The temporal association observed between the removal of his entorhinal cortex along with a significant part of hippocampus and the developing severe memory deficit inspired scientists to focus on these regions. The subsequent discovery of the so-called place cells in the hippocampus launched the description of many other functional cell types and neuronal networks throughout the Papez-circuit that has a key role in memory processes and spatial information coding (speed, head direction, border, grid, object-vector etc). Each of these cell types has its own unique characteristics, and together they form the so-called “Brain GPS”. The aim of this short survey is to highlight for practicing neurologists the types of cells and neuronal networks that represent the anatomical substrates and physiological correlates of pathological entities affecting the limbic system, especially in the temporal lobe. For that purpose, we survey early discoveries along with the most relevant neuroscience observations from the recent literature. By this brief survey, we highlight main cell types in the hippocampal formation, and describe their roles in spatial navigation and memory processes. In recent decades, an array of new and functionally unique neuron types has been recognized in the hippocampal formation, but likely more remain to be discovered. For a better understanding of the heterogeneous presentations of neurological disorders affecting this anatomical region, insights into the constantly evolving neuroscience behind may be helpful. The public health consequences of diseases that affect memory and spatial navigation are high, and grow as the population ages, prompting scientist to focus on further exploring this brain region.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Consensus statement of the Hungarian Clinical Neurogenic Society about the therapy of adult SMA patients]

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[Background – Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive, progressive neuromuscular disorder resulting in a loss of lower motoneurons. Recently, new disease-modifying treatments (two drugs for splicing modification of SMN2 and one for SMN1 gene replacement) have become available. Purpose – The new drugs change the progression of SMA with neonatal and childhood onset. Increasing amount of data are available about the effects of these drugs in adult patients with SMA. In this article, we summarize the available data of new SMA therapies in adult patients. Methods – Members of the Executive Committee of the Hungarian Clinical Neurogenetic Society surveyed the literature for palliative treatments, randomized controlled trials, and retrospective and prospective studies using disease modifying therapies in adult patients with SMA. Patients – We evaluated the outcomes of studies focused on treatments of adult patients mainly with SMA II and III. In this paper, we present our consensus statement in nine points covering palliative care, technical, medical and safety considerations, patient selection, and long-term monitoring of adult patients with SMA. This consensus statement aims to support the most efficient management of adult patients with SMA, and provides information about treatment efficacy and safety to be considered during personalized therapy. It also highlights open questions needed to be answered in future. Using this recommendation in clinical practice can result in optimization of therapy.]

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Possible genotype-phenotype correlations in Niemann-Pick type C patients and miglustat treatment

ÇAKAR Emel Nafiye, ÖNAL Hasan

Niemann-Pick type C is a rare lysosomal storage disease caused by impaired intracellular cholesterol transport. The autosomal recessive disease is caused by mutations in NPC1 or NPC2 genes. Clinical-laboratory features, genotype-phenotype correlation and miglustat treatment response of our patients diagnosed with early infantile Niemann-Pick type C were evaluated. In this article, four Niemann-Pick type C patients diagnosed in the early infantile period are presented. Common features of our patients were hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, cholestasis and retardation in motor development. Patients 1 and 2 are twins, with homozygous mutation c.2776G>A p.(Ala926Thr) in NPC1 gene and severe lung involvement. Lung involvement, which is mostly associated with NPC2 gene mutation in the literature, was severe in our patients and they died early. In patients 3 and 4, there were respectively c.2972del p.(Gln991Argfs*6) mutation in NPC1 gene and c.133C>T p.(Gln45*) homozygous mutation in NPC2 gene. In these two patients, improvement in neurological findings were observed with treatment of miglustat. In our twin patients, severe lung involvement was observed. Two of our four early infantile Niemann-Pick type C patients exhibited neurological gains with miglustat treatment.