Hungarian Radiology

[REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE]

WENINGER Csaba, GYENES György

JUNE 20, 2006

Hungarian Radiology - 2006;80(03-04)

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Hungarian Radiology

[Renal cystic lesions The importance of CT in diagnosis and management in correlation with Bosniak classification]

AL-ABSI Mohammed, QAIS Abdulmalik, AL-NONO Ibrahim, GHILAN Abdulilah, GAFOUR Abdul Mohammed

[OBJECTIVE - The purpose of this study was to assess the importance of CT in differentiating renal cystic masses of surgical causes from those of non-surgical masses. PATIENTS AND METHODS - The patients included in this study were collected from a private diagnostic center and university hospital prospectively, yielding a total of 55 analyzable renal cystic lesions. A careful helical CT abdomen focusing on the kidneys with intravenous contrast was obtained from all patients. The lesions were categorized into surgical and medical renal cystic masses using the Bosniak classification system supported by histology reports and follow up protocols for medical cases. RESULTS - Of 55 cases, 35 were classified as surgical (13 lesions as category IV and 22 as III) and 20 as medical cases (15 as category II and 5 as III). Out of 22 resected category III lesions 15 were found to be malignant and all categorized as type IV were malignant. No malignancies have been identified in the prospectively monitored group of patients. CONCLUSION - Our series results are comparable with other teaching institution series, and support the usefulness of the Bosniak classification system in separating renal cystic lesion into surgical and non-surgical lesions but with diagnostic categorization difficulty of complicated multilocular hydatid cysts versus neoplastic (category III) cystic masses.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Radiological diagnosis of lung cancer - 2005 Literature review Onco Update 2005]

BALÁZS György

[Our aim is to review the radiologic literature of lung cancer of 2004 and some remarkable publications from 2003. There are three main groups in the recent publications dealing with lung cancer’s radiology. The first group comprises those reviews and metaanalyses which focus on the overall utility and reliability of routinely applied modalities such as CT and MRI. In the second group we find original articles reporting on the experience with new modalities. This group is dominated by publications dealing with positron emission tomography and the first clinical results of combined PET-CT technology. In the third part we review those articles dealing with lung cancer screening. Radiological lung cancer screening is in the focus of interest again, mainly due to the introduction of low-dose CT which is undoubtadly the most sensitive radiological modality for the early detection of lesions, however, its clinical utility is debated. The papers referred are basically sceptic, but this is not the end, because controlled long term follow-up studies are still in progress. Part of the publications report on the first clinical results of new methods, while others give valuable additional data regarding the performance of “well established” radiological modalities.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Markusovszky memorial session]

GÁSPÁRDY Géza

Hungarian Radiology

[Scientific session on the 85th Anniversary of the Clinic of Radiology in Debrecen]

MÓZES Péter

Hungarian Radiology

[Advisory Meeting of the European radiographers]

VANDULEK Csaba

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Risk of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Focus on aceclofenac]

FARSANG Csaba

[Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most frequently used pharmaceuticals. Nevertheless, a number of studies emphasized that NSAIDs were damaging not only the gastrointestinal (GI), but also the cardiovascular (CV) system, could increase the blood pressure, the frequency of coronary events (angina, myocardial infarction) and stroke incidence, as well as they might deterio­rate renal functions. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) did not find evidence that administering NSAIDs could increase the risk of developing COVID-19 or worsened the condition of COVID-19 patients. However, unwanted effects of specific drugs differ substantially in their occurrence and seriousness as well. It seemed to be for a long time that the NSAIDs provoked higher GI-risk was closely related to the COX1/COX2 selectivity, like the cardiovascular (CV) risk to the COX2/COX1 selectivity, however, the recent data did not prove it clearly. Based on the available literature while pondering the gastrointestinal and cardiovascular adverse events, among all NSAIDs the aceclofenac profile seemed to be the most favourable.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Neuroscience highlights: The mirror inside our brain

KRABÓTH Zoltán, KÁLMÁN Bernadette

Over the second half of the 19th century, numerous theories arose concerning mechanisms involved in understanding of action, imitative learning, language development and theory of mind. These explorations gained new momentum with the discovery of the so called “mirror neurons”. Rizzolatti’s work inspired large groups of scientists seeking explanation in a new and hitherto unexplored area of how we perceive and understand the actions and intentions of others, how we learn through imitation to help our own survival, and what mechanisms have helped us to develop a unique human trait, language. Numerous studies have addressed these questions over the years, gathering information about mirror neurons themselves, their subtypes, the different brain areas involved in the mirror neuron system, their role in the above mentioned mechanisms, and the varying consequences of their dysfunction in human life. In this short review, we summarize the most important theories and discoveries that argue for the existence of the mirror neuron system, and its essential function in normal human life or some pathological conditions.

Clinical Neuroscience

Neuroscience highlights: Main cell types underlying memory and spatial navigation

KRABOTH Zoltán, KÁLMÁN Bernadette

Interest in the hippocampal formation and its role in navigation and memory arose in the second part of the 20th century, at least in part due to the curious case of Henry G. Molaison, who underwent brain surgery for intractable epilepsy. The temporal association observed between the removal of his entorhinal cortex along with a significant part of hippocampus and the developing severe memory deficit inspired scientists to focus on these regions. The subsequent discovery of the so-called place cells in the hippocampus launched the description of many other functional cell types and neuronal networks throughout the Papez-circuit that has a key role in memory processes and spatial information coding (speed, head direction, border, grid, object-vector etc). Each of these cell types has its own unique characteristics, and together they form the so-called “Brain GPS”. The aim of this short survey is to highlight for practicing neurologists the types of cells and neuronal networks that represent the anatomical substrates and physiological correlates of pathological entities affecting the limbic system, especially in the temporal lobe. For that purpose, we survey early discoveries along with the most relevant neuroscience observations from the recent literature. By this brief survey, we highlight main cell types in the hippocampal formation, and describe their roles in spatial navigation and memory processes. In recent decades, an array of new and functionally unique neuron types has been recognized in the hippocampal formation, but likely more remain to be discovered. For a better understanding of the heterogeneous presentations of neurological disorders affecting this anatomical region, insights into the constantly evolving neuroscience behind may be helpful. The public health consequences of diseases that affect memory and spatial navigation are high, and grow as the population ages, prompting scientist to focus on further exploring this brain region.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Consensus statement of the Hungarian Clinical Neurogenic Society about the therapy of adult SMA patients]

BOCZÁN Judit, KLIVÉNYI Péter, KÁLMÁN Bernadette, SZÉLL Márta, KARCAGI Veronika, ZÁDORI Dénes, MOLNÁR Mária Judit

[Background – Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive, progressive neuromuscular disorder resulting in a loss of lower motoneurons. Recently, new disease-modifying treatments (two drugs for splicing modification of SMN2 and one for SMN1 gene replacement) have become available. Purpose – The new drugs change the progression of SMA with neonatal and childhood onset. Increasing amount of data are available about the effects of these drugs in adult patients with SMA. In this article, we summarize the available data of new SMA therapies in adult patients. Methods – Members of the Executive Committee of the Hungarian Clinical Neurogenetic Society surveyed the literature for palliative treatments, randomized controlled trials, and retrospective and prospective studies using disease modifying therapies in adult patients with SMA. Patients – We evaluated the outcomes of studies focused on treatments of adult patients mainly with SMA II and III. In this paper, we present our consensus statement in nine points covering palliative care, technical, medical and safety considerations, patient selection, and long-term monitoring of adult patients with SMA. This consensus statement aims to support the most efficient management of adult patients with SMA, and provides information about treatment efficacy and safety to be considered during personalized therapy. It also highlights open questions needed to be answered in future. Using this recommendation in clinical practice can result in optimization of therapy.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Possible genotype-phenotype correlations in Niemann-Pick type C patients and miglustat treatment

ÇAKAR Emel Nafiye, ÖNAL Hasan

Niemann-Pick type C is a rare lysosomal storage disease caused by impaired intracellular cholesterol transport. The autosomal recessive disease is caused by mutations in NPC1 or NPC2 genes. Clinical-laboratory features, genotype-phenotype correlation and miglustat treatment response of our patients diagnosed with early infantile Niemann-Pick type C were evaluated. In this article, four Niemann-Pick type C patients diagnosed in the early infantile period are presented. Common features of our patients were hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, cholestasis and retardation in motor development. Patients 1 and 2 are twins, with homozygous mutation c.2776G>A p.(Ala926Thr) in NPC1 gene and severe lung involvement. Lung involvement, which is mostly associated with NPC2 gene mutation in the literature, was severe in our patients and they died early. In patients 3 and 4, there were respectively c.2972del p.(Gln991Argfs*6) mutation in NPC1 gene and c.133C>T p.(Gln45*) homozygous mutation in NPC2 gene. In these two patients, improvement in neurological findings were observed with treatment of miglustat. In our twin patients, severe lung involvement was observed. Two of our four early infantile Niemann-Pick type C patients exhibited neurological gains with miglustat treatment.