Hungarian Radiology

[’Reality instead of abstractions’]

SZÁNTÓ Dezső

FEBRUARY 20, 2002

Hungarian Radiology - 2002;76(01)

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Hungarian Radiology

[Foreign body in the appendix]

NYITRAI Anna, KISS Imre, KIS Éva

Hungarian Radiology

[Current questions of quality assurance in diagnostic radiology in the light of a visit to England]

PORUBSZKY Tamás, GICZI Ferenc, BALLAY László, PELLET Sándor

[Physical-technical aspects of quality assurance in diagnostic radiology, because of its dependence on technology are of an extraordinary importance. The intention of Hungary to join EU makes at least the decrease of our lag in this respect unavoidable. Ministerial order 31/2001 (X. 3.) EüM which already came into force requires quality assurance in diagnostic radiology explicitly. This paper starts with definition of basic concepts, then outlooks shortly the history and present international situation of quality assurance in diagnostic radiology. We review preliminaries and the present situation in Hungary, including results of the National Patient Dose Assessment Programme till now. We think that the most efficient help to the initial steps of quality assurance in diagnostic radiology in Hungary may be the appropriate adaptation of experiences of the leading countries. Therefore we review experiences of one of the authors gained during visiting three medical physics centres in England in details. The following topics are discussed: legal requirements, types and levels of measurements, organizational problems, practical evaluation of measurements (including criteria of discarding equipment), patient dosimetry, personal dosimetry, mammography research, instrumentation of the radiology departments, calibration of measuring devices, questions of the so-called type testing and radiation protection training of workers.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Conference of the Senior Club and Youth Committee of the Society of the Hungarian Radiologists]

BARKOVICS Mária

Hungarian Radiology

[Once more on the Six Sigma]

Hungarian Radiology

[UltraSonography]

LOMBAY Béla

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EREN Fulya, ALDAN Ali Mehmet, DOGAN Burcu Vasfiye, GUL Gunay, SELCUK Hatem Hakan, SOYSAL Aysun

Background - Metronidazole is a synthetic antibiotic, which has been commonly used for protozoal and anaerobic infections. It rarely causes dose - and duration - unrelated reversible neurotoxicity. It can induce hyperintense T2/FLAIR MRI lesions in several areas of the brain. Although the clinical status is catastrophic, it is completely reversible after discontinuation of the medicine. Case report - 36-year-old female patient who had recent brain abscess history was under treatment of metronidazole for 40 days. She admitted to Emergency Department with newly onset myalgia, nausea, vomiting, blurred vision and cerebellar signs. She had nystagmus in all directions of gaze, ataxia and incompetence in tandem walk. Bilateral hyperintense lesions in splenium of corpus callosum, mesencephalon and dentate nuclei were detected in T2/FLAIR MRI. Although lumbar puncture analysis was normal, her lesions were thought to be related to activation of the brain abscess and metronidazole was started to be given by intravenous way instead of oral. As lesions got bigger and clinical status got worse, metronidazole was stopped. After discontinuation of metronidazole, we detected a dramatic improvement in patient’s clinical status and MRI lesions reduced. Conclusion - Although metronidazole induced neurotoxicity is a very rare complication of the treatment, clinicians should be aware of this entity because its adverse effects are completely reversible after discontinuation of the treatment.

LAM Extra for General Practicioners

[CARDIOVASCULAR PREVENTION OPPORTUNITIES OF RISK REDUCTION, 2010]

NAGY András Csaba

[10 years of experience following the millennium has confirmed again that data on long term cardiovascular morbidity and mortality can be influenced by effective prevention most substantially. Growing body of knowledge and experience in the field of modern cardiovascular prevention is available, but novel and novel milestone studies have been published leading to updating of guidelines, however, we cannot be satisfied with the results. Evidence suggest that despite recent efforts, Hungarian cardiovascular morbidity and mortality has not been reduced significantly and except for some success - acute ST elevation myocardial infarction care in accordance with the European standard - we are behind the other EU countries in cardiovascular mortality of the active (age 30-65 years) age group. Recently several interesting contradiction has been published in the field of prevention, like the effectiveness of aspirin as primer prevention, which changes our common prevention conception. Data have to be also addressed, which can explain the controversial results from a different point of view. Now we are talking about the results of REALITY study, which highlight not only the noncompliance of the patient but that of the physician as well.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Reality and Mystery – The Art of El Greco]

NAGY Zsuzsanna

Lege Artis Medicinae

[ANTICOAGULATION AND THROMBOEMBOLIC DISEASES - INDICATIONS, PROBLEMS AND PRACTICAL ASPECTS]

SAS Géza

[The widespread application of the LMW heparins promoted the prevention and therapy of the thromboembolic diseases in Hungary. Their propagation is mainly due to their simple clinical application and the active promotion of the producing pharmaceutical companies. However, the recommended “unnecessary” (in the reality the lack of) laboratory control may cause severe complications (bleeding, thromboembolism etc.) sometimes especially at the therapeutic application. For this reason, unfractionated (UF) heparin is advised in case of acute deep vein thrombosis when a patient is in the particular danger of bleeding because of its better controllability and the opportunity to stop anticoagulation immediately. In recent years, the indication of the long-term anticoagulation therapy expanded significantly. The number of patients is ever growing who need continuous anticoagulation because of atrial fibrillation or venous thromboembolic episode taken place earlier. Large randomised multicenter trials proved the efficacy of prolonged coumarin therapy in the prevention of recurrence of thromboembolic episodes in these diseases. Due to its advantageous pharmacological characteristics warfarin is especially suitable for the attainment of continuous anticoagulation. The direct thrombin inhibitor melagatran (and its orally applicable form, ximelagatran) may open a new era in the prophylaxis and therapy of the thromboembolic diseases. Its advantageous pharmacological characteristics and its simple application may make them to the antithrombotics of the future in case of a reasonable price and/or subsidisation.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Switching from human basal insulin to once daily insulin detemir in type 2 diabetic patients treated by basal-bolus regimen - Results from the LEONCET2, an observational, prospective, multicenter study]

JEMENDY György

[Insulin analogues have been developed in order to overcome some drawbacks of human insulins. Switching from a human insulin-based basal- bolus regimen to once daily detemir could result in improved metabolism and increased safety of the therapy. We assessed the effects of switching from human NPH-insulin to once daily detemir insulin in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus treated with a basal-bolus insulin regimen. We evaluated the data of 1,474 patients with diabetes (age: 59.1±9.8 years, body weight 89.6±8.6 kg, BMI 31.6±5.4 kg/m2) in an observational, prospective, 24-week, multicenter study. All patients were treated with a basal-bolus regimen consisting of human NPH as basal insulin and a human or analogue insulin as bolus insulin. After enrollment, patients received once daily detemir insulin instead of NPH-insulin, while treatment with bolus insulin was continued. Patients were examined at weeks 12 and 24. By week 24, the mean HbA1c value, irrespective of BMI-categories, decreased significantly (p<0.0001) from 8.63±1.01% by 0.79±0.63%. Fasting blood glucose level decreased from 8.86±1.78 mmol/l to 7.09±1.31 mmol/l; p<0.0001). The target level of HbA1c (<7.0%) was reached by 194 patients (13.1%). The patients’ body weight decreased significantly by week 12 (-0.69±2.00 kg; p<0.0001) and by week 24 (-1.28±2.80 kg; p<0.0001). The changes were more pronounced in higher than in lower BMI-categories (p for trend <0.0001). The mean daily doses of basal insulin were increased from 0.28 IU/kg to 0.33 IU/kg while those of bolus insulins were not changed. The rate of severe hypoglycaemic events decreased significantly (p=0.048) from 2.95 [daytime 1.02, nocturnal 1.93] to 0.06 [daytime 0.04, nocturnal 0.02] episodes/patient-year. In patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus treated with basal-bolus regimen, switching from human basal insulin to once daily insulin detemir results in a significantly improved metabolism, as well as fewer hypoglycaemic events and decreased body weight. Nevertheless, the low rate of patients reaching the glycaemic target implicates that some factors other than an appropriate basal insulin substitution have a role in achieving an optimal metabolic control.]