Hungarian Radiology

[Radiotherapy]

GYENES György

AUGUST 20, 2003

Hungarian Radiology - 2003;77(04)

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Hungarian Radiology

[Our experiences with the use of phosphor plate X-ray system and PACS]

BARTA H. Miklós, BERENTEY Ernő, FORNET Béla, FORRAI Gábor

[In this study the experiences, the advantages and disadvantages of a full digital radiology department are presented. The conventional radiology and the spot films of gastroenterologic studies are exposed on phosphor plates since 1999 at our department. Two work-stations are used for making the reports and six viewing-stations are installed at distant departments. A central server organizes the data and pictures flow and the archive system consists of magnetooptical discs in a juke-box. The conventional X-ray methods are fully integrated in the system. The number of hardcopies is dramatically decreased. The clinicians may easily access the images on the viewingstations. Possibility of teleradiology and teleconsultation is integrated in the system. The quality of the examinations is improved and became uniform. The images of different methods (CT, fluoroscopy) are stored also in digital format. The disadvantages are the high cost of installation, a new workflow and reporting habits must be initiated. A problem of one element can cause the breakdown of the whole system. The new technics, the digital world forces us to develope and define new technical standards in order to obtain uniform quality.]

Hungarian Radiology

[40th Congress of the European Association of Pediatric Radiology Genova, 2-6th June 2003.]

KIS Éva

Hungarian Radiology

[Radial scar associated with lobular neoplasia in the breast]

ERDŐSI Éva, HERTELENDY Ágnes, GREXA Erzsébet, ANGA Béla, VARGA Zoltán

[INTRODUCTION - The authors are presenting the case of a 55-year-old female patient with breast abnormalities of unclear morphology. CASE REPORT - The lesion seen in the left breast was characteristic of radial scar in which, however, numerous, but not clearly benign microcalcifications were detected. During histological examination a radial scar associated with a small lobular neoplasia was diagnosed. However, these microcalcifications were not related to the malignancy. CONCLUSION - In radial scar extensive benign microcalcifications may develop. Nevertheless we should bear in mind that in 10-30% of cases this disorder can be associated with malignancy even without mammographic signs. The final diagnosis, however, should always be made on the basis of histological examination.]

Hungarian Radiology

[The congress of ESGAR was a success in Budapest]

MESTER Ádám

Hungarian Radiology

[Cheirospondyloenchondromatosis]

IGNYS Anna, MALGORZATA Krajewska-Walasek, MARIKOVA Olga, IVO Marik, KAZIMIERZ Kozlowski

[The term of cheirospondyloenchondromatosis (CHE) was coined by Spranger et al. This generalised, distinctive form of enchondromatosis is characterised by mild to moderate dwarfism, short hands and feet with beaded fingers, prominent large joints and frequently mental deficiency. Major radiographic features include generalised mild platyspondyly, generalised enchondromatosis with marked involvement of hands and feet and small ilia with eroded crests and acetabular roofs. We report three patients with this rare, severe form of enchondromatosis and stress some differences between our patients and the classical description of Spranger et al.]

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Evaluation of ischemic stroke patients with systemic cancer

UFUK Emre, TASKIN Gunes, IREM Pinar, FURUZAN Kokturk, ESENGUL Liman, ORHAN Yağiz

Purpose - In cancer patients, an ischemic stroke can be seen as both a direct effect of cancer and a complication of treatment. This condition can negatively affect the follow-up and treatment of these patients. For this research, we aimed to evaluate the clinical features, stroke types and etiological features of ischemic stroke patients with histories of cancer or found to have cancer during the aetiological investigation. Materials and methods - We retrospectively evaluated 100 patients (57 males, 43 females) who were hospitalized with acute stroke and determined to have the presence of cancer or a cancer history during the aetiological investigation between 2011 and 2016. All the demographic features, stroke types and localizations, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores, Rankin Scale scores, durations of cancer and cancer treatments were recorded. Results - The mean age of the patients was 67.07 ± 10.9 years old, the median NIHSS score was 5, and the median Rankin Scale score was 4. While 79% of patients had ischemic stroke risk factors, 21% did not. Atherosclerotic stroke was the most common stroke type (49%, n=49) and cryptogenic strokes were detected in 21% (n=21). In addition, 63% of the patients had chronic cancer (later than 6 months), 31% of the patients had recent cancer histories (less than 6 months), and 29% of the patients had metastases. Among all the malignancies, lung cancer (n=23), gastrointestinal cancer (n=20) and gynaecological-breast cancer (n=16) were the three most common. Moreover, 37% of the patients underwent chemotherapy, 29% underwent radiotherapy, and 88% of the patients had Carotid/Vertebral Doppler USG abnormalities. Conclusion - Similar to what is stated in the literature, an atherosclerotic stroke was the most common type of stroke in the cancer patients. Stroke risk factors were not detected in 21% of the patients, and in the majority of the patients, atherosclerotic changes in the carotid artery were observed in the Doppler examinations. In the aetiology and prognosis of ischemic stroke, it is important to keep in mind the existence of cancer in addition to the classical stroke risk factors.

Clinical Neuroscience

[F-DOPA PET/MR based target definiton in the 3D based radiotherapy treatment of glioblastoma multiforme patients. First Hungarian experiences ]

SIPOS Dávid, TÓTH Zoltán, LUKÁCS Gábor, BAJZIK Gábor, HADJIEV Janaki, CSELIK Zsolt, REPA Imre, KOVÁCS Árpád

[Introduction - Radiotherapy plays important role in the complex oncological treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The modern 3D radiotherapy treatments are based on cross-sectional CT and MR information, however more attention is being paid to functional hybrid imaging describing the biological and functional morphology of tumor lesions. 18F-DOPA is an amino acid tracer with high specificity and sensitivity, which may play an important role in the precise definition of target volume in the irradiation process of GBM patients. Our study presents the first experiences with 18F-DOPA based PET/CT/MR 3D irradiation planning process. Methods - In Hungary the 18F-DOPA radiotracer has been available for clinical use since September 2017. Between September 2017 and January 2018, at the Somogy County Kaposi Mór Teaching Hospital Dr. József Baka Diagnostic, Radiation Oncology, Research and Teaching Center 3 histologically verified glioblastoma multiforme patients received 18F-DOPA based 3D irradiation treatment. In the contouring process the native planning CT scanes were fused with the PET/MR series (T1 contrast enhanced, T2 and 18F-DOPA sequences). We defined 18F-DOPA uptake volume (BTV-F-DOPA), the T1 contrast enhanced MRI volume (GTV-T1CE), and the volume of the area covered by oedema on the T2 weighted MRI scan (CTV-oedema) in all patients. We also registered the BTV-F-DOPA volumes not covered by the conventional MR based target volumes. Results - Examining the 3 cases, the average volume of 18F-DOPA tumor was 22.7 cm3 (range 15.3-30.9; SD = 7.82). The average GTV T1 CE was found to be 8.7 cm3 (range 3.8-13.2; SD = 4.70). The mean CTV oedema volume was 40.3 cm3 (range 27.7-57.7; SD = 15.36). A non-overlapping target volume difference (BTV-F-DOPA not covered by CTV oedema area) was 4.5 cm3 (range 1-10.3; SD = 5.05) for PTV definition. Conclusion - Based on our results the tumor area defined by the amino acid tracer is not fully identical with the MRI defined T2 oedema CTV. 18F-DOPA defined BTV can modify the definiton of the PTV, and the radiotherapy treatment. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Valproate in the treatment of epilepsy and status epilepticus]

JANSZKY József, TÉNYI Dalma, BÓNÉ Beáta

[According to Hungarian guidelines, valproate - with the exception of infants and small children as well as fertile women - is the first drug of choice in generalized and unclassified epilepsies because it is effective in most seizure types and epilepsy syndromes. It is highly effective in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. Even though it is not the first-line drug in focal epilepsies, if the first-line therapy is ineffective, it is a plausible alternative as second choice therapy, owing to its different mechanism of action. If the type of epilepsy can’t be surely established, valproate is the drug of choice, as it possesses the broadest-spectrum among antiepileptic drugs. After administration of benzodiazepines, intravenously applied valproate can be a first choice therapy in all types of status epilepticus, owing to its broad-spectrum and efficacy. Valproate is the first-choice therapy in patients with glioblastoma - independently of the seizure type -, as it is likely to improve the survival rate with 2-10 months and the effectivity of chemo- and radiotherapy. Valproate is generally not suggested for fertile women, but - as it is the most effective therapy in some epilepsy syndromes -, the patient has the right to choose valproate therapy, thus undertaking the elevated risk of developmental abnormalities, for higher safety regarding seizures. If only valproate therapy owns the ability to obtain seizure freedom, then stopping its administration is not suggested, but a low dosage has to be aimed (500-600 mg/day, but not more than 1000 mg/day): according to some studies, most idiopathic generalized epilepsies can be controlled by low valproate dosage. Stopping valproate therapy in case of an ongoing pregnancy is not suggested. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Early experience with CyberKnife treatment in case of intra-, suprasellar hypernephroma metastasis]

SIPOS László, BAJCSAY András, KONTRA Gábor, CZIRJÁK Sándor, JÁNVÁRY Levente, FEDORCSÁK Imre, POLGÁR Csaba

[Among tumours found in the suprasellar region metastases are very rare and the most frequent primary tumours are lung and breast cancer. Data of a patient with clear cell renal carcinoma with intra-suprasellar metastasis will be discussed. As in most of the tumours in the sellar region, the first symptom was visual deterioration with visual field defect. A transsphenoidal debulking of the tumour was performed and the residual tumor was treated by CyberKnife hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Both our patient’s visual acuity and visual field impairment improved after the surgery and CyberKnife treatment. At 6-month after irradiation, MR of the sella showed a complete remission of the tumour. This was the first treatment with CyberKnife in our country in case of a tumour close to the optic chiasm. According to our best knowledge, there are 21 cases in the literature with renal cell carcinoma metastasis in the suprasellar region.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Post-operative management of primary glioblastoma multiforme in patients over 60 years of age]

DARÓCZI Borbála, SZÁNTÓ Erika, TÓTH Judit, BARZÓ Pál, BOGNÁR László, BAKÓ Gyula, SZÁNTÓ János, MÓZES Petra, HIDEGHÉTY Katalin

[Background and purpose - Optimal treatment for elderly patients with glioblastoma multiforme is not well defined. We evaluated the efficacy of post-operative radiotherapy with or without concomitant and/or adjuvant temozolomide in patients aged ≥60 years to assess survival and identify prognostic factors of survival. Methods - A retrospective analysis of overall survival and progression-free survival in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme aged ≥60 years treated with postoperative radiotherapy with or without temozolomide chemotherapy was conducted at our institutions. Prognostic factors were determined by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results - Of 75 study participants (54.7% male; median age at first diagnosis, 65.1 years), 29 (38.7%) underwent gross total resection, whereas others underwent partial resection or biopsy only. All but 1 patient received radiotherapy. Twenty patients received concomitant temozolomide only. Adjuvant temozolomide (1-50 cycles) was administered in 42 patients; 16 received ≥6 cycles. Median overall survival was 10.3 months. One- and 2-year overall survival rates were 42.6% and 6.7%, respectively. Median progression-free survival was 4.1 months. Radiochemotherapy was generally well tolerated. Median overall survival was 15.3 and 29.6 months for patients who received 6-12 cycles and >12 cycles of adjuvant temozolomide, respectively. There were no significant differences in overall survival between age groups (60-64, 65-69, and ≥70 years). Adjuvant temozolomide, Karnofsky performance status ≥70, and additional surgery after progression were significant prognostic factors of longer overall survival (p<0.05). Conclusions: Radiochemotherapy, including ≥6 cycles of adjuvant temozolomide, was safe and prolonged survival of glioblastoma patients aged ≥60 years. Aggressive therapy should not be withheld from patients aged ≥60 years with good performance status because of age.]