Hungarian Radiology

[Radiotherapy]

GYENES György

AUGUST 20, 2003

Hungarian Radiology - 2003;77(04)

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[Intersphincteric resection for low rectal tumors]

METZGER Péter

[The technical development of rectal surgery, together with chemo- and radiotherapy, improved the effi ciency of surgical intervention as well as the patients‘ survival and quality of life. The treatment of ultra deep malignancies - 2-3 cm from linea dentata - is a real challenge for rectal surgery. Before the introduction of laparoscopy the removal of the deep tumors with conventional surgical techniques was impossible to save the tumorous rectum. The new techniques made possible the ultra deep resection, i.e. the removal even those tumors which progressed until the linea dentata. The explosive use of laparoscopy and the new waves of chemo- and radiotherapy resulted signifi cance advance contributed to an interdisciplinary therapeutic approach, which is a well adapted method in deep rectal surgery. In case of ultra deep localization of tumors - 0.5-1.0 cm to linea dentata - the neoadjuvant therapy supported the saving the anal sphicter. This new techniques contributed to the preservation of feces continentia of the patient.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Evaluation of ischemic stroke patients with systemic cancer

UFUK Emre, TASKIN Gunes, IREM Pinar, FURUZAN Kokturk, ESENGUL Liman, ORHAN Yağiz

Purpose - In cancer patients, an ischemic stroke can be seen as both a direct effect of cancer and a complication of treatment. This condition can negatively affect the follow-up and treatment of these patients. For this research, we aimed to evaluate the clinical features, stroke types and etiological features of ischemic stroke patients with histories of cancer or found to have cancer during the aetiological investigation. Materials and methods - We retrospectively evaluated 100 patients (57 males, 43 females) who were hospitalized with acute stroke and determined to have the presence of cancer or a cancer history during the aetiological investigation between 2011 and 2016. All the demographic features, stroke types and localizations, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores, Rankin Scale scores, durations of cancer and cancer treatments were recorded. Results - The mean age of the patients was 67.07 ± 10.9 years old, the median NIHSS score was 5, and the median Rankin Scale score was 4. While 79% of patients had ischemic stroke risk factors, 21% did not. Atherosclerotic stroke was the most common stroke type (49%, n=49) and cryptogenic strokes were detected in 21% (n=21). In addition, 63% of the patients had chronic cancer (later than 6 months), 31% of the patients had recent cancer histories (less than 6 months), and 29% of the patients had metastases. Among all the malignancies, lung cancer (n=23), gastrointestinal cancer (n=20) and gynaecological-breast cancer (n=16) were the three most common. Moreover, 37% of the patients underwent chemotherapy, 29% underwent radiotherapy, and 88% of the patients had Carotid/Vertebral Doppler USG abnormalities. Conclusion - Similar to what is stated in the literature, an atherosclerotic stroke was the most common type of stroke in the cancer patients. Stroke risk factors were not detected in 21% of the patients, and in the majority of the patients, atherosclerotic changes in the carotid artery were observed in the Doppler examinations. In the aetiology and prognosis of ischemic stroke, it is important to keep in mind the existence of cancer in addition to the classical stroke risk factors.

Clinical Oncology

[Protontherapy]

LAKOSI Ferenc, HADJIEV Janaki, CSELIK Zsolt, GULYBÁN Ákos

[Radiotherapy with protons is a promising technology in the fi eld of modern radiation oncology. From a physical point of view, radiotherapy with protons has important advantages compared to the currently used photons due to its unique energy absorption profi le, which may result in a better local tumor control and reduced radiation-induced side effects. Increasing number of patients is treated with protons and carbon-ions. Our report aim to present the current status of proton radiotherapy including physical and technological aspects, standard and non-standard indications, ongoing clinical trials and the proton vs. photon debate in terms of patient selection.]

Clinical Oncology

[Current treatment of gastrointestinal lymphomas]

PAKSI Melinda, ISTENES Ildikó, KÖRÖSMEZEY Gábor, DEMETER Judit

[The most common extranodal site involved by lymphoma is the gastrointestinal tract. The majority of extranodal lymphoma cases are of the non-Hodgkin subtype. Usually, the involvement of the gastrointestinal tract by nodal lymphomas is secondary, the primary gastrointestinal localisation is rather rare. The most common pathological types are diffuse large B-cell lymphomas and extranodal marginal zone lymphomas of the mucosa-associated tissue (MALT) subtype. Although the primary gastrointestinal lymphoma can involve any part of the gastrointestinal tract, the stomach is the most frequently involved site. The treatment and prognosis are determinated primarily by the histologic type of lymphoma, the stage of disease and the patient’s age and general condition. Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection is one of the major risk factors for gastric lymphomas, the presence or abscence of which radically infl uences the effectivity of treatment. In case of HP positivity, HP eradication itself can result in complete remission. In most cases the treatment is immuno- and/or combination chemotherapy, which is performed according to the internationally accepted protocols, specifi c to the type of lymphoma. Radiotherapy plays a lesser role in the treatment of GI lymphomas, while surgery is performed almost only in complicated cases, such as haemorrhage, occlusion or perforation.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Post-operative management of primary glioblastoma multiforme in patients over 60 years of age]

DARÓCZI Borbála, SZÁNTÓ Erika, TÓTH Judit, BARZÓ Pál, BOGNÁR László, BAKÓ Gyula, SZÁNTÓ János, MÓZES Petra, HIDEGHÉTY Katalin

[Background and purpose - Optimal treatment for elderly patients with glioblastoma multiforme is not well defined. We evaluated the efficacy of post-operative radiotherapy with or without concomitant and/or adjuvant temozolomide in patients aged ≥60 years to assess survival and identify prognostic factors of survival. Methods - A retrospective analysis of overall survival and progression-free survival in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme aged ≥60 years treated with postoperative radiotherapy with or without temozolomide chemotherapy was conducted at our institutions. Prognostic factors were determined by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results - Of 75 study participants (54.7% male; median age at first diagnosis, 65.1 years), 29 (38.7%) underwent gross total resection, whereas others underwent partial resection or biopsy only. All but 1 patient received radiotherapy. Twenty patients received concomitant temozolomide only. Adjuvant temozolomide (1-50 cycles) was administered in 42 patients; 16 received ≥6 cycles. Median overall survival was 10.3 months. One- and 2-year overall survival rates were 42.6% and 6.7%, respectively. Median progression-free survival was 4.1 months. Radiochemotherapy was generally well tolerated. Median overall survival was 15.3 and 29.6 months for patients who received 6-12 cycles and >12 cycles of adjuvant temozolomide, respectively. There were no significant differences in overall survival between age groups (60-64, 65-69, and ≥70 years). Adjuvant temozolomide, Karnofsky performance status ≥70, and additional surgery after progression were significant prognostic factors of longer overall survival (p<0.05). Conclusions: Radiochemotherapy, including ≥6 cycles of adjuvant temozolomide, was safe and prolonged survival of glioblastoma patients aged ≥60 years. Aggressive therapy should not be withheld from patients aged ≥60 years with good performance status because of age.]