Hungarian Radiology

[RADIOLOGICAL EVENTS, 2007]

MARCH 20, 2007

Hungarian Radiology - 2007;81(01-02)

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Hungarian Radiology

[2nd National Meeting of the Radiology Residents]

NAGY Endre, PALKÓ András, LOMBAY Béla

Hungarian Radiology

[Transcranial Doppler monitoring of distal embolism during of carotid stenting]

SZIKRA Péter, VÖRÖS Erika, SZTRIHA László, SZÓLICS Alex

[INTRODUCTION - Reducing the risk of embolisation during endovascular treatment of internal carotid artery stenosis is very important. The rate of embolisation is affected by the different steps of stenting manipulation. Using transcranial Doppler equipment we studied the embolic signals during the different phases of carotid dilatation and stenting. MATERIAL AND METHOD - 50 patients (33 male, 17 female; mean age 64 years) were intraproceduraly monitorized with transcranial Doppler. Predilatation was necessary in nine cases, postdilatation was performed in 39 cases. The number of emboli were measured in seven different steps of endovascular treatment of carotid stenosis. Different type of commercial available endovascular devices were used. RESULTS - Intraprocedural embolisation was observed in every case. In different phases of carotid stenting the rate of embolisation showed marked differences in each phase of carotid stenting. Crossing the stenosis with stent delivery system were accompanied by a low rate of embolism (5.3) compared to the level during stent opening (9.16) and balloon dilatation (9.96). The highest level of embolisation was observed during predilatation (15.9) without the protection of the stent. CONCLUSIONS - We detected embolisation in all of the cases, however the number of embolic signals varied in different phases of carotid artery stenting. Embolisation can be reduced if the most dangerous steps (i.e. pre- and postdilatation) are avoided. Using TCD monitorisation the physician can be informed by the degree of embolisation that may alarm the interventionalist to perform the procedure more carefully, furthermore it can be employed during the training of carotid stenting.]

Hungarian Radiology

[The emperor’s new cloth]

LOMBAY Béla

Hungarian Radiology

[Az emlődaganatok radiológiai vizsgálatának újdonságai Onco Update, 2007]

FORRAI Gábor, BODOKY György

[Experiences about the breast diagnostic methods are accumulating year-to-year, rapidly. Therefore the current examination algorithm is changing continuously. New diagnostic and therapeutic modalities are entering into the daily practice. Some of them became obsolete, so far their application is becoming a faulty decision. Some other methods become obligatory steps in the diagnostics. These are the reasons why the up-to-date knowledge of the literature is mandatory. Systematic review of the most recent articles of the last two years (January 2005-December 2006) of breast radiological diagnostics and the actual place of the imaging and interventional methods are presented. The following topics are summarized: breast cancer screening with conventional and digital mammography, computer assisted diagnostics (CAD), high risk patients' screening, US, MRI, MSCT, PET/CT, diagnostic interventions, differential diagnostics, percutaneous tumour ablation, therapy-related questions in the diagnostic work up.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Zsófia Farbaky: Basics of musculoskeletal ultrasound]

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Clinical Neuroscience

Life threatening rare lymphomas presenting as longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis: a diagnostic challenge

TOLVAJ Balázs, HAHN Katalin, NAGY Zsuzsanna, VADVÁRI Árpád, CSOMOR Judit, GELPI Ellen, ILLÉS Zsolt, GARZULY Ferenc

Background and aims – Description of two cases of rare intravascular large B-cell lymphoma and secondary T-cell lymphoma diagnosed postmortem, that manifested clinically as longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM). We discuss causes of diagnostic difficulties, deceptive radiological and histological investigations, and outline diagnostic procedures based on our and previously reported cases. Case reports – Our first case, a 48-year-old female was admitted to the neurological department due to paraparesis. MRI suggested LETM, but the treatments were ineffective. She died after four weeks because of pneumonia and untreatable polyserositis. Pathological examination revealed intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVL). Our second case, a 61-year-old man presented with headache and paraparesis. MRI showed small bitemporal lesions and lesions suggesting LETM. Diagnostic investigations were unsuccessful, including tests for possible lymphoma (CSF flow cytometry and muscle biopsy for suspected IVL). Chest CT showed focal inflammation in a small area of the lung, and adrenal adenoma. Brain biopsy sample from the affected temporal area suggested T-cell mediated lymphocytic (paraneoplastic or viral) meningoencephalitis and excluded diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The symptoms worsened, and the patient died in the sixth week of disease. The pathological examination of the presumed adenoma in the adrenal gland, the pancreatic tail and the lung lesions revealed peripheral T-cell lymphoma, as did the brain and spinal cord lesions. Even at histological examination, the T-cell lymphoma had the misleading appearance of inflammatory condition as did the MRI. Conclusion – Lymphoma can manifest as LETM. In cases of etiologically unclear atypical LETM in patients older than 40 years, a random skin biopsy (with subcutaneous adipose tissue) from the thigh and from the abdomen is strongly recommended as soon as possible. This may detect IVL and provide the possibility of prompt chemotherapy. In case of suspicion of lymphoma, parallel examination of the CSF by flow cytometry is also recommended. If skin biopsy is negative but lymphoma suspicion remains high, biopsy from other sites (bone marrow, lymph nodes or adrenal gland lesion) or from a simultaneously existing cerebral lesion is suggested, to exclude or prove diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, IVL, or a rare T-cell lymphoma.

Hungarian Radiology

[The quality control of radiological equipments in Hungary]

PELLET Sándor, PORUBSZKY Tamás, BALLAY László, GICZI Ferenc, MOTOC Anna Mária, VÁRADI Csaba, TURÁK Olivér, GÁSPÁRDY Géza

Clinical Neuroscience

Association of anterior thoracic meningocele and azygos lobe of the lung

DENIZ Ersay Fatih, SENAYLI Atilla, BICAKCI Ünal

Here we report an anterior thoracic meningocele case. Twoyears- old female patient was presented with kyphosis. Azygos lobe of the lung was also demonstrated during radiological studies. Posterolateral thoracotomy incision and extralpeural approach was performed for excision of the anterior meningocele to untether the cord. Although both anomalies are related to faulty embryogenesis and it is well known that faulty embryogenesis may also reveal coexisting abnormalities, we could not speculate a common mechanism for anterior thoracic meningocele and azygos lobe of the lung association.

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Combination of leflunomide and biologic agents in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis]

SZŰCS Gabriella

[Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease that leads to progressive joint destruction, functional disability and extra-articular complications. The initial approach to treatment of RA begins with the diagnosis, estimation of patient’s prognosis and the implementation of a therapeutic plan. Most important is early and aggressive treatment with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Among the different protocols, combination therapies including methotrexate and/ or biologics seem to be more effective than monotherapies. Biological therapies introduced in recent years opened a new era in the treatment of RA. Randomized, controlled trials have demonstrated that the addition of methotrexate to biologic agents, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) inhibitors generally increases their ability to retard structural damage, reduce disease activity and improve function. However, not all patients tolerate or respond to methotrexate. One of the most common used alternative DMARDs is leflunomide. Earlier several smaller retrospective studies, later prospective cohort studies, and finally two new populationbased longitudinal observational studies found that the above-mentioned parameters in RA patients treated with anti-TNF agents and leflunomide were similar to those receiving anti-TNF and methotrexate in combination. In addition, there were no significant differences in the frequency of adverse events between the groups. Taken together, leflunomide should be regarded as an effective and safe alternative in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Is second-line immunomodulatory treatment effective in multiple sclerosis?]

RÁCZ Lilla, BERÉNYI Ervin, BARSI Péter, BERNÁTH Dávid, CSÉPÁNY Tünde

[Purpose - Natalizumab is the first evidence based monoclonal antibody, which was launched for treatment in relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis in Hungary in 2010. Standardized follow-up is required to use it. Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy and to monitor the safety of natalizumab treatment by using an electronic database established for MS registry. Clinical activity was measured by annual relapse rates, functional status of patients measured by EDSS and MFSC. Radiological activity was evaluated by standard MRI protocol. Data, results of MS patients and side effects of natalizumab treatment were recorded in iMed software. Results - 31 patients started the natalizumab treatment after 6.5±5.8 years from the onset of MS. The efficacy of treatment was evaluated after a mean of 67 (min: 14 max: 128) infusions in December 2016. The drop-out rate was low, due to the presence of neutralising antibodies in one case, pregnancy in two cases and development of malignant disease in one case which was not related to the natalizumab treatment. The treatment was well tolerated with excellent compliance without serious side effects. The annual relapse rate reduced from a mean of 1.7 to 0.03 (p<0.000001) in the first 12 months of treatment compared to the pretreatment 12 month activity, and it stayed at low level during the whole follow up. EDSS was stable or improved with an exception of two cases. In 23 subjects (77%) lack of new/enlarging T2 lesions and lack of gadolineum-enhancing lesions on MRI were observed. 18 patients (60%) had no evidence of disease activity (NEDA-3). PASAT test improved in most of the cases. Conclusion - The natalizumab therapy was very effective in all cases including those patients who had active disease under the previous immunomodulatory treatment.]