Hungarian Radiology

[Pediatric urology]

HARKÁNYI Zoltán

JUNE 20, 2007

Hungarian Radiology - 2007;81(03-04)

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Hungarian Radiology

[The quality control of radiological equipments in Hungary]

PELLET Sándor, PORUBSZKY Tamás, BALLAY László, GICZI Ferenc, MOTOC Anna Mária, VÁRADI Csaba, TURÁK Olivér, GÁSPÁRDY Géza

Hungarian Radiology

[Imre Lélek memorial session, 2007]

BAHÉRY Mária

Hungarian Radiology

[First Central and Eastern European Workshop on Quality Control, Patient Dosimetry and Radiation Protection in Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine]

GÁSPÁRDY Géza

Hungarian Radiology

[Board meeting of the Educational Committee of the European Society of Radiologists]

HARKÁNYI Zoltán

Hungarian Radiology

[XV. French-Hungarian Symposium of Radiology]

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