Hungarian Radiology

[Networks]

LOMBAY Béla

OCTOBER 10, 2005

Hungarian Radiology - 2005;79(05)

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Hungarian Radiology

[Thoughts on PET-CT]

GALUSKA László

Hungarian Radiology

[The force transmission of the distal endings of stent delivery systems]

SZIKRA Péter, VÖRÖS Erika, SZTRIHA László, SZÓLICS Alex, CSIKÁSZ Tamás

[INTRODUCTION - In cases of endovascular treatment of internal carotid artery stenosis, one of the most important aspects is to minimise embolic complications. Dislodging emboli may be influenced by the shape and size of tapered endings of stent delivery systems. Our team performed measurements and calculations on the emergence of force of the various tapered endings. MATERIAL AND METHOD - Five different commercially available stent dilivery systems were investigated. The thickness of the devices were measured and taking 5 mm normal artery diameter, the lumen size was calculated, above which the delivery system should dilate the lumen mechanically. By means of geometrical computer-constructions and measurements, we analysed the forces directed ahead and laterally, emerging on the surface of tapered endings during the passing through the stenosis. RESULTS - The stent delivery systems were between 5.0 and 5.9 F in diameter, and even the stent delivery system of lowest profile would dilate a stenosis of over 89%. The different endings are tapered with variable lengths. The force transmission on the vessel wall of different directions was distinct at the various points of the cone surfaces. The forces directed ahead were less than those directed laterally on the larger part of a cone surface. Irregularity of the cone surfaces distributed the forces unfavorably. Considering the features of tapered endings, the atraumatic introduction of the devices required a range of upper limits of stenoses between 89.76-98.04%, which are more feasible values than those deternined by shaft sizes. CONCLUSIONS - Our experimental work suggests, that the shape and size of the endings of stent delivery systems influence the forces affecting vessel wall plaques, and in this manner, embolic complications, during carotid stenting. The lowest risk of embolisation could be induced by using the longest and smoothest tapered endings.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Board Meeting of the Hungarian College of Radiology]

PALKÓ András, FORRAI Gábor

Hungarian Radiology

[Quality cost in radiology: the cost of repeated examinations]

KIS Zsuzsanna

[INTRODUCTION - The aim of the author is to describe the definition and types of quality cost in the health care services especially in the field of radiology. The proportion of the quality cost is based on the author's data and data from the literature. The ways of reduction of the quality cost is also discussed. MATERIAL AND METHODS - The author made a research based on a prior multicentric study to determine the loss derived from the excessive use of films used during the repeated radiological examination. The cost of wrong services nationwide is calculated on the basis of the loss per 1000 German point. RESULTS - Our short research showed that 300 000 Ft HUF + VAT per year was paid because of the excessive use of the films during the repeated examination points within the given period of time. The loss percentage per 1000 German points can be calculated based on the points generated during a given time. In this way there was more than 300 million HUF spent on defective services nationwide in 2002. CONCLUSION - The cost of defective services and resulting moral and financial losses justify the need for finding and reducing the costs. Quality control and quality improvement can be used to achieve the aims of controlling the processes by the right indicators. By discussing them the processes will improve, the costs will be lower and quality also improves. The patients and insurance companies who buy our services also have the same expectations.]

Hungarian Radiology

[REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE]

GYENES György

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