Hungarian Radiology

[Necrotising sarcoid granulomatosis: imitator in the chest]

AGÓCS Ágnes, ZIBOTICS Hilda, GREXA Erzsébet

APRIL 20, 2004

Hungarian Radiology - 2004;78(02)

[INTRODUCTION - Both intra and extrapulmonary manifestation of necrotising sarcoid granulomatosis is very rare. It is characterised by variable pulmonary radiological picture, typical histology and benign clinical course CASE REPORT - A young male patient was admitted to our hospital due to a mass lesion in the right apex of the lung suspicious of tuberculosis discovered on plain chest X-ray. Antituberculotic therapy resulted no change of radiological picture. Cytological sample taken by ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration contained no tumor cells. Finally necrotising sarcoid granulomatosis was confirmed by histological examination of the mass removed by atypical surgical resection. CONCLUSION - Intrapulmonary necrotising sarcoid granulomatosis has a variable picture. It has no typical radiological pattern or localisation, therefore it is impossible to diagnose by X-ray morphology. Final diagnosis is based on histology.]

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