Hungarian Radiology

[Monteggia fracture]

SHAIKH Shoaib, LOMBAY Béla, KISS Ákos

JULY 15, 2009

Hungarian Radiology - 2009;83(02)

[The Monteggia fracture is a very challenging injury, not only for the treating surgeon but also for the radiologist. The correct and timely identification of the injury is vital for a favourable outcome. Following is an overview of the Monteggia fracture.]

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