Hungarian Radiology

[Markusovszky memorial session]

GÁSPÁRDY Géza

JUNE 20, 2006

Hungarian Radiology - 2006;80(03-04)

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Hungarian Radiology

[Renal cystic lesions The importance of CT in diagnosis and management in correlation with Bosniak classification]

AL-ABSI Mohammed, QAIS Abdulmalik, AL-NONO Ibrahim, GHILAN Abdulilah, GAFOUR Abdul Mohammed

[OBJECTIVE - The purpose of this study was to assess the importance of CT in differentiating renal cystic masses of surgical causes from those of non-surgical masses. PATIENTS AND METHODS - The patients included in this study were collected from a private diagnostic center and university hospital prospectively, yielding a total of 55 analyzable renal cystic lesions. A careful helical CT abdomen focusing on the kidneys with intravenous contrast was obtained from all patients. The lesions were categorized into surgical and medical renal cystic masses using the Bosniak classification system supported by histology reports and follow up protocols for medical cases. RESULTS - Of 55 cases, 35 were classified as surgical (13 lesions as category IV and 22 as III) and 20 as medical cases (15 as category II and 5 as III). Out of 22 resected category III lesions 15 were found to be malignant and all categorized as type IV were malignant. No malignancies have been identified in the prospectively monitored group of patients. CONCLUSION - Our series results are comparable with other teaching institution series, and support the usefulness of the Bosniak classification system in separating renal cystic lesion into surgical and non-surgical lesions but with diagnostic categorization difficulty of complicated multilocular hydatid cysts versus neoplastic (category III) cystic masses.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Radiological diagnosis of lung cancer - 2005 Literature review Onco Update 2005]

BALÁZS György

[Our aim is to review the radiologic literature of lung cancer of 2004 and some remarkable publications from 2003. There are three main groups in the recent publications dealing with lung cancer’s radiology. The first group comprises those reviews and metaanalyses which focus on the overall utility and reliability of routinely applied modalities such as CT and MRI. In the second group we find original articles reporting on the experience with new modalities. This group is dominated by publications dealing with positron emission tomography and the first clinical results of combined PET-CT technology. In the third part we review those articles dealing with lung cancer screening. Radiological lung cancer screening is in the focus of interest again, mainly due to the introduction of low-dose CT which is undoubtadly the most sensitive radiological modality for the early detection of lesions, however, its clinical utility is debated. The papers referred are basically sceptic, but this is not the end, because controlled long term follow-up studies are still in progress. Part of the publications report on the first clinical results of new methods, while others give valuable additional data regarding the performance of “well established” radiological modalities.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Scientific session on the 85th Anniversary of the Clinic of Radiology in Debrecen]

MÓZES Péter

Hungarian Radiology

[Advisory Meeting of the European radiographers]

VANDULEK Csaba

Hungarian Radiology

[Quality insurance in radiology]

FEHÉR Lászlóné

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Lege Artis Medicinae

[End of the line? Addenda to the health and social care career of psychiatric patients living in Hungary’s asylums]

KAPÓCS Gábor, BACSÁK Dániel

[The authors are focusing on a special type of long term psychiatric care taking place in Hungary outside of the conventional mental health care system, by introducing some institutional aspects of the not well known world of so called social homes for psychiatric patients (asylums). After reviewing several caracteristics of institutional development of psychiatric care in Hun­gary based on selected Hungarian and in­ternational historical sources, the main struc­tural data of present Hungarian institutional capacities of psychiatric health and social care services are shown. Finally, the authors based on own personal experiences describe several functional ascpects of the largest existing asylum in EU, a so­cial home for long term care of psychiatric pa­tients. By the beginning of the 20th century, Hungarian psychiatric institutions were operating on an infrastructure of three large mental hospitals standing alone and several psychiatric wards incorporated into hospitals. Nevertheless, at the very first session of the Psychiatrists’ Conference held in 1900 many professionals gave warning: mental institutions were overcrowded and the quality of care provided in psychiatric hospital wards, many of which located in the countryside of Hungary, in most cases was far from what would have been professionally acceptable. The solution was seen in the building of new independent mental hospitals and the introduction of a family nursing institution already established in Western Europe; only the latter measure was implemented in the first half of the 20th century but with great success. However, as a result of the socio-political-economic-ideological turn following the Second World War, the institution of family nursing was dismantled while different types of psychiatric care facilities were developed, such as institutionalised hospital and outpatient care. In the meantime, a new type of institution emerged in the 1950s: the social home for psychiatric pa­tients, which provided care for approximately the same number of chronic psychiatric patients nationwide as the number of functioning hospital beds for acute psychiatric patients. This have not changed significantly since, while so­cial homes for psychiatric patients are perhaps less visible to the professional and lay public nowadays, altough their operational conditions are deteriorating of late years. Data show, that for historical reasons the current sys­tem of inpatient psychiatric care is proportionately arranged between health care and social care institutions; each covering one third. Further research is needed to fully explore and understand the current challenges that the system of psychiatric care social- and health care institu­tions are facing. An in-depth analysis would significantly contribute to the comprehensive improvement of the quality of services and the quality of lives of patients, their relatives and the health- and social care professionals who support them. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[The impact of neuroleptic medication on seizure threshold and duration in electroconvulsive therapy]

GAZDAG Gábor, BARNA István, IVÁNYI Zsolt, TOLNA Judit

[Introduction - In most patients diagnosed with psychotic depression or schizophrenia and treated with electroconvulsive therapy, parallelly administered antipsychotic medication cannot be stopped. Antipsychotic drugs can influence both seizure threshold and seizure activity in different ways. Patients and method - The present study processes the data of 77 patients treated parallelly with electroconvulsive therapy and antipsychotic drugs. Oral doses of the antipsychotic medication administered the day before the electroconvulsive therapy, stimulus intensity, seizure durations, and impedance were analysed from session to session. Results - One group of antipsychotics (haloperidol, fluphenazine, risperidone, sulpirid) was not found to influence seizure activity: there was no significant difference in EEG and EMG registered seizure duration or in stimulus intensity between the treated and non-treated group. However, significant difference was found between the next treated and non-treated groups in 40% of the sessions in case of olanzapine, in 50% of the sessions in case of clozapine and in 57% of the sessions in case of zuclopenthixol in EEG or EMG registered seizure duration as well as in stimulus intensity. In the third group (quetiapine) there was a significant difference in each session (2nd session: EMG, p=0.02; 5th session: EEG, p=0.05, EMG, p=0.04). Most of the antipsychotics (olanzapine, clozapine, zuclopenthixol) have been shown to possess epileptogenic properties; only quetiapine reduces seizure activity. Conclusion - In the clinical use of olanzapine, clozapine and zuclopenthixol seems epileptogenic, whereas in the case of quetiapine seizure reducing properties must be taken into account. Together with the consideration of the accompanying somatic and neurologic disturbances and with the concomitant medications this can influence the treatment of choice.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Márton Lányi's memorial tablet]

GÖBLYÖS Péter

Clinical Neuroscience

[MOVEMENT-RELATED BETA RESPONSES IN ESSENTIAL TREMOR AND PARKINSON’S DISEASE]

GERTRÚD Tamás, PÁLVÖLGYI László, TAKÁTS Annamária, SZIRMAI Imre, KAMONDI Anita

[Objective - To investigate the pathomechanism of essential (ET) and parkinsonian tremor (PT) by studying the correlation between tremor severity and movement-related beta rhythm changes of the human electroencephalogram. Patients and methods - We recorded the electroencephalogram of 10 patients with essential tremor, 10 with Parkinsonian tremor and 10 controls. In a preliminary session we determined the side with lower and higher tremor intensity (T+, T++ respectively), using accelerometry. Subjects pressed an on-off switch in a self-paced manner with left and right thumb. After digitalization of the EEG from Cz, C3, C4 electrodes, the movement reactive beta frequency (MRBF), its minimum/maximum peak power values and their latencies triggered to movement offset were determined. Results - The time course and amplitude of movement related beta desynchronization (ERD) were similar in each group regardless of tremor intensity. In ET tremor severity did not influence post-movement beta synchronization (PMBS) amplitude (PMBSET+=100.98±48.874%, PMBSET++=135.1±92.87%; p=0.231), however it was significantly delayed after the movement of the more tremulous hand (latPMBSET+=1.26±0.566 s, latPMBSET++= 1.57±0.565 s, p=0.003). In the PT group on the side of pronounced tremor the amplitude of PMBS decreased but it was not delayed, compared to the less affected hand (PMBSPT+=115.19±72.131%, PMBSPT++= 77.84±53.101%, p=0.0028; latPMBSPT+=1.4±0.74 s, latPMBSPT++=1.25±0.797 s, p=0.191). In controls the power and latency of PMBS was similar on both sides. Conclusions - The results suggest that neuronal mechanisms underlying PMBS generation are differently affected by ET and PT. Investigation of PMBS might be used for the differential diagnosis of essential tremor and Parkinson's disease.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Ceremonial scientific session on the occasion of Zoltán Dézsi’s 80th birthday - Debrecen, 10th November, 2008]

PINTYE Éva