Hungarian Radiology

[Head for head]

LOMBAY Béla

AUGUST 20, 2004

Hungarian Radiology - 2004;78(04)

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[The purpose of this overview is to demonstrate the recent results of breast diagnostics and the place of the imaging and interventional methods. Review of the most recent articles (September 2002- December 2003) in the following subjects: breast screening, digital mammography, computer assisted diagnosis, breast ultrasound, breast MRI, scintimammography, positron emission tomography, guided biopsies, other interventions, new diagnostical methods, percutaneous tumour ablation. Experiences about breast diagnostic methods are accumulating year-to-year rapidly. Therefore the current examination algorithm is changing continuously. New diagnostic and therapeutic modalities are entering in the daily routine. These are the reasons why the up-to-date knowledge of the literature is mandatory.]

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