Hungarian Radiology

[Dual energy computed tomography - dual-source CT]

WENINGER Csaba, CSETE Mónika, SZUKITS Sándor, DÉRCZY Katalin, VÁRADY Edit, BATTYÁNY István

MAY 15, 2010

Hungarian Radiology - 2010;84(01)

[The authors describe fundamentals of computed tomography (CT) examination performed by dual-source, dual energy CT scanner. The special applications of dual energy acquisition are demonstrated, e. g. examination of pulmonary perfusion in case of embolism, bone subtraction during CT angiography, differentiation of various stones and calcifications. The dual energy acquisition can improve the accuracy and sensitivity of the radiological diagnosis.]

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[Radiological assessment of the combined high tibial osteotomy in the frontal plane]

PAPP Miklós, KÁROLYI Zoltán, FAZEKAS Péter, SZABÓ László, PAPP Levente, RÓDE László

[INTRODUCTION - High tibial osteotomy (HTO) is a generally accepted treatment for medial unicompartmental osteoarthritis of the knee with varus alignment. The main principle of HTO is to achieve a transfer of loading from diseased, arthritic areas of the joint to areas with relatively intact, healthly cartilage. This stress reduction can be achieved with correction of the loading axis. A stress reduction occurs in the medial compartment of the knee when the loading axis is transferred from the medial compartment to just lateral to the center of the joint. PATIENTS AND METHODS - We performed radiological assessment of 52 knees preoperatively and after combined high tibial osteotomy (CO) in the 10th postoperative week, in the 12th postoperative month and in the 5th postoperative year on a standing weight-bearing anteroposterior radiograph. CO involved performing a proximal osteotomy parallel to the tibial plateau, followed by a distal osteotomy extending from the lateral part of the tibia to the line of the proximal osteotomy at the center of the tibial condyle. After closure of the lateral part of the osteotomy and consequent opening of the medial part, the removed lateral bone wedge was transferred to the gap on the medial side. Pre- and postoperatively we measured the lateral angle between the anatomic axis of the femur and the distal articular surface of the femur (FCFS), the lateral angle between the anatomic axis of the tibia and the proximal articular surface of the tibia (TP-TS) and the lateral angle between the distal articular surface of the femur and the proximal articular surface of the tibia (the articular component of the varus deformity FC-TP). We determined the FTA as a sum of FC-FS, TP-TS and FC-TP. RESULTS - The FC-TP, the TP-TS and the FTA decreased significantly after CO according to data measured in the 10th postoperative week. We achieved the planned correction (FTA 171-169°) in 77% of cases. Undercorrection (FTA ≥172°) was detected in 7, overcorrection (FTA ≤168°) was noted in 5 cases. We detected significant loss of correction between the 10th postoperative week and the 12th postoperative month (the FTA increased significantly, the loss of correction was 1° in 26 cases, 2° in 7 cases). The valgus alignment did not increase in any case. The articular component did not change in 36 cases. We did not note significant loss of correction and the valus alignment did not increase in any case between the 12th postoperative month and 5th postoperative year. We noted the recurrence of varus deformity in 1 case. We detected loss of correction due to increasing articular component in further 4 cases. The FC-FS did not change during the first 5 postoperative years. CONCLUSION - If we achieved the planned correction (FTA 171-169°) according to data measured in the 10th postoperative week on a standing weight-bearing anterposterior radiographs, we did not detect recurrence of varus deformity in any case during the first 5 postoperative years. If the articular component (FC-TP) did not change between the 12th postoperativ month and the 5th postoperative year (in 61.5% of cases), in our opinion we achieved the optimal correction.]

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