Hungarian Radiology

[Correlation of clinical parameters with myocardial perfusion grades in acute myocardial infarct patients]

UNGI Tamás, JÓNÁS Zsuzsanna, UNGI Imre, SASI Viktor, ZIMMERMAN Zsolt, PALKÓ András

JUNE 20, 2007

Hungarian Radiology - 2007;81(03-04)

[INTRODUCTION - The prognosis after opening the obstructed infarct-related coronary artery is influenced by several factors. In routine clinical practice revascularization is considered to be successful when the restoration of epicardial blood flow is complete. However, functional impairment in the myocardium can occur even with open epicardial arteries. There are two angiographic parameters closely related to myocardial viability: myocardial blush grade (MBG) that describes the quantity of contrast material in the myocardium, and TIMI myocardial perfusion grade (TMP) that describes its outflow dynamics. Our goal was to assess the prognostic value of these two parameters in the framework of a prospective clinical study. PATIENTS AND METHODS - We compared the two parameters based on visual estimation (MBG and TMP) with those characterizing myocardial impairment, such as ejection fraction (EF), wall motion score index (WMSI), creatine-kinase release and chest pain score in 22 patients with acute myocardial infarction and successful revascularization. Our results were obtained by Spearman's rank correlation and χ2-tests at a confidence interval of 95%. RESULTS - Close correlation with TMP was found in case of both parameters measured by echocardiography (EF: r=0.59, p=0.02; WMSI: r=-0.51, p=0.046). These results were supported by the correlation with creatinekinase release (r=-0.54, P=0.01). By the present number of patients, MBG does not show significant correlation with the measured clinical parameters. Presence of chest pain is associated neither with TMP nor with MBG. CONCLUSIONS - Assessing myocardial perfusion by visual evaluation provides useful prognostic information. The extent of chest pain does not indicate myocardial dysfunction. The clearence of the dye (used in TMP definition) is more characteristic to myocardial viability than maximal contrast density (used in MBG definition).]

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Hungarian Radiology

[The quality control of radiological equipments in Hungary]

PELLET Sándor, PORUBSZKY Tamás, BALLAY László, GICZI Ferenc, MOTOC Anna Mária, VÁRADI Csaba, TURÁK Olivér, GÁSPÁRDY Géza

Hungarian Radiology

[Imre Lélek memorial session, 2007]

BAHÉRY Mária

Hungarian Radiology

[First Central and Eastern European Workshop on Quality Control, Patient Dosimetry and Radiation Protection in Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine]

GÁSPÁRDY Géza

Hungarian Radiology

[Board meeting of the Educational Committee of the European Society of Radiologists]

HARKÁNYI Zoltán

Hungarian Radiology

[XV. French-Hungarian Symposium of Radiology]

KOCSIS Beáta

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Lege Artis Medicinae

[ISOTOPE BASED CARDIAC DIAGNOSTICS - POSSIBILITIES IN NUCLEAR CARDIOLOGY]

BALOGH Ildikó

[Methods of nuclear cardiology have been applied for several decades and there is continuous development in this area. The most commonly used modality is the myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS). During stress MPS, the presence and the severity of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) can be detected. Resting MPS can show a freshly developing acut myocardial infarction (AMI) immediately, but new and old infarcted myocardial areas can not be distinguished by this method. Using SPECT (single photon emission tomography) examination and quantitative analysis can improve the accuracy of MPS. With gated SPECT we can analyse both the perfusion and the function of left ventricle. To examine the function of left and right ventricle the “gold standard” non-invasive method is MUGA (multiple gated acquisition) of blood pool scintigraphy. After only a few hours of the onset of AMI we can detect it with the socalled infarct avid scintigraphy using radiopharmaceuticals which accumulate in affected area. Following an AMI it is essential to differentiate among high and low risk patients for revascularisation treatment, therefore distinguishing the viable (hibernating) and non-viable (necrotic) myocardium with imaging techniques is an important task. Preserved metabolism as the sign of viable myocardium can be detected both by SPECT (most accurately by thallium rest-redistribution scintigraphy) and PET (detecting glucose metabolism by F-18-FDG). Adrenerg receptor scintigraphy can show the sympathetic innervation: in the case of a transplanted heart it can detect the reinnervation and in the case of malignant ventricular tachyarrhythmias the risks and the severity of the illness.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Myocardial contrast echocardiography]

TEMESVÁRI András, LENGYEL Mária, PAOLO Voci

[Symptoms of ischemic heart disease will occur when myocardial perfusion diminishes below a critical level. Coronarography will disclose the anatomic stenoses, but there is no direct correlation between the grade of stenosis and the change of myocardial perfusion. Myocardial contrast echocardiography is a new technique to analyze the myocardial perfusion. The contrast agent contains micro bubbles which have nearly the same dimensions as red blood cells. The microbubbles increase the „whiteness" of the perfused myocardium during the echocardiographic examinations. The change in „whiteness" of the myocardium correlates with myocardial perfusion. Intracoronary injections delineate the perfusion area of the coronary artery, and Thus the coronary flow reserve and the collateral flow area can be measured. The cardioplegia fluid distribution and the graft perfusion area are examined intraoperatively. Bedside myocardial perfusion studies will be possible through the transpulmonary passage of intravenously injected contrast agents. Myocardial contrast echocardiography can be applied both in the diagnosis and treatment of ischemic heart disease.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Late simultaneous carcinomatous meningitis, temporal bone infiltrating macro-metastasis and disseminated multi-organ micro-metastases presenting with mono-symptomatic vertigo – a clinico-pathological case reporT

JARABIN András János, KLIVÉNYI Péter, TISZLAVICZ László, MOLNÁR Anna Fiona, GION Katalin, FÖLDESI Imre, KISS Geza Jozsef, ROVÓ László, BELLA Zsolt

Although vertigo is one of the most common complaints, intracranial malignant tumors rarely cause sudden asymmetry between the tone of the vestibular peripheries masquerading as a peripheral-like disorder. Here we report a case of simultaneous temporal bone infiltrating macro-metastasis and disseminated multi-organ micro-metastases presenting as acute unilateral vestibular syndrome, due to the reawakening of a primary gastric signet ring cell carcinoma. Purpose – Our objective was to identify those pathophysiological steps that may explain the complex process of tumor reawakening, dissemination. The possible causes of vestibular asymmetry were also traced. A 56-year-old male patient’s interdisciplinary medical data had been retrospectively analyzed. Original clinical and pathological results have been collected and thoroughly reevaluated, then new histological staining and immunohistochemistry methods have been added to the diagnostic pool. During the autopsy the cerebrum and cerebellum was edematous. The apex of the left petrous bone was infiltrated and destructed by a tumor mass of 2x2 cm in size. Histological reexamination of the original gastric resection specimen slides revealed focal submucosal tumorous infiltration with a vascular invasion. By immunohistochemistry mainly single infiltrating tumor cells were observed with Cytokeratin 7 and Vimentin positivity and partial loss of E-cadherin staining. The subsequent histological examination of necropsy tissue specimens confirmed the disseminated, multi-organ microscopic tumorous invasion. Discussion – It has been recently reported that the expression of Vimentin and the loss of E-cadherin is significantly associated with advanced stage, lymph node metastasis, vascular and neural invasion and undifferentiated type with p<0.05 significance. As our patient was middle aged and had no immune-deficiency, the promoting factor of the reawakening of the primary GC malignant disease after a 9-year-long period of dormancy remained undiscovered. The organ-specific tropism explained by the “seed and soil” theory was unexpected, due to rare occurrence of gastric cancer to metastasize in the meninges given that only a minority of these cells would be capable of crossing the blood brain barrier. Patients with past malignancies and new onset of neurological symptoms should alert the physician to central nervous system involvement, and the appropriate, targeted diagnostic and therapeutic work-up should be established immediately. Targeted staining with specific antibodies is recommended. Recent studies on cell lines indicate that metformin strongly inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition of gastric cancer cells. Therefore, further studies need to be performed on cases positive for epithelial-mesenchymal transition.