Hungarian Radiology

[Computer tomography based planning by personal computer in surgery of forefoot]

HUSZANYIK István, HEGEDŰS Franciska, RÓDE László

DECEMBER 20, 2006

Hungarian Radiology - 2006;80(07-08)

[BACKGROUND - In contradiction to traditional osteographic registrations CT pictures give the possibility of precise and size proportional measurements. Three-dimensional reconstructions can help in imaging of stereoscopic structures, however later reediting is not possible. Authors elaborated a CT based system for planning surgical interventions with personal computer. MATERIALS AND METHODS - The new method is described using a forefoot surgery model. The measurements were based on three subcapital osteotomy of 1st metatarsus. The length of 1st metatarsus, the 1st-2nd metatarsus index, the 1st-2nd intermetatarsal angle, and dorsoplantar movement of 1st-2nd metatarsal head were determined. RESULTS - The postoperative result of correction and pathologic bone movement can also precisely determined by this method. CONCLUSION - This method seems to be practical for elaboration of other new operating techniques, predicting and verifying their results before clinical use.]

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Hungarian Radiology

[23rd Congress of the Society of Hungarian Radiologists, 1st Hungarian-Austrian Congress of Radiology]

HARKÁNYI Zoltán

Hungarian Radiology

[Aquired non-inflammatory and non-traumatic hypoplasia-dysplasia of the femoral neck Report of two cases]

NICOL Richard, MARZENA Wisniewska, KAZIMIERZ Kozlowski

[Recently DiFazio et al reported four children with remarkable femoral neck deformity who had extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) therapy. We report two patients with similar femoral neck changes who did not have ECMO treatment but have had complicated, strenuous first few weeks after birth. The first patient had been operated on twice for diaphragm repair at the age of 18 hours and 1 month. The second patient had cardiac surgery at the age of two months, with one hour of extracorporeal cardiorespiratory bypass. We agree with DiFazio et al and believe that four of their patients and both of ours have femoral neck growth cartilage injury secondary to hypoxia, vascular disturbance and coagulopathy.]

Hungarian Radiology

[EAR+ECR=ESR Turning-point in life of European radiology]

PALKÓ András

Hungarian Radiology

[Gas collection in the superior mesenteric and in the portal veins]

LUDVIG Zsuzsanna, PAP Tímea, SZILÁGYI Adrienn, KOSTYÁL László, BARTA Szabolcs, BOTOS Ákos

[INTRODUCTION - Intrahepatic gas is frequently seen during abdominal ultrasound studies which is generally of biliary origin due to biliary interventional procedures e.g. endoscopic sphincterotomy. In our case, large amount of intrahepatic gas was present originated from the superior mesenteric and portal veins. CASE REPORT - A 94-year-old male patient with vomiting, shivering and heavy abdominal pain was admitted in bad condition to the department of surgery. Billroth II gastric resection was noted in the case history. Chest, plain abdominal X-ray and abdominal ultrasound examination was performed. Ultrasonography showed a large amount gas collection in the region of the left liver lobe (no prior history of endoscopic sphincterotomy). It was difficult to perform abdominal ultrasound due to the intrahepatic gas collection and abdominal bowel gas. Computer tomographic examination confirmed the presence of intrahepatic gas which is localized in the portal venous system. Large amount of gas collection was seen in the abdominal cavity, in the mesenterium and in the retroperitoneum. In addition a gallstone of 2 cm in size was found in the duodenum. CONCLUSION - CT scans confirmed the perforation of gall bladder due to subsequent cholecystic- duodenal fistula. As a consequence of perforation, inflammation of the mesentery and retroperitoneum developed causing mesenteric vein thrombosis and bowel wall necrosis. Bacteria in the necrotic bowel wall produced gas which entered into the veins and reached the portal system.]

Hungarian Radiology

[6th Central and Eastern European Frankofon Congress of Radiology]

VARGA Andrea

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