Hungarian Radiology

[CALENDAR OF RADIOLOGICAL EVENTS, 2002]

JUNE 20, 2002

Hungarian Radiology - 2002;76(03)

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Hungarian Radiology

[The doyen of pediatric radiology: dr. György Köteles]

LOMBAY Béla

Hungarian Radiology

[NEWS]

NAGY Gyöngyi

Hungarian Radiology

[Ogilvie’s syndrome associated with excretory urography]

SZÁNTÓ Dezső, SZŰCS Gabriella

[INTRODUCTION - The Ogilvie's syndrome is a disturbance of colonic innervation with parasympathic overreaction was assumed to be cause of large bowel segment spasm and poststenotic accumulation of gas. There is no distention in small intestine. CASE REPORT - In case of a 15 years old male during excretory urography six minutes after the administration of contrast material infusion Ogilvie's syndrome had occured. On 6, 12 and 18 min. abdominal plain film were demonstrated the acute spasm and poststenotic large bowel distention by air lumenogram phenomenon in the kidneys ambilateral renal tuberculosis by the whitening-like contrast opacity arising from centre calyx (pyelotubular reflux) in right side and by clubbing of calyces in left side (daisy flower sign). Not involved the small intestine. The colonic spasm and accumulation of gas lasted approximately 6 hours and ceased without medical aid. CONCLUSION - The Ogilvie's syndrome accompanying excretory urography is a toxic effect attributing to transient injury of peripheric neures and neurovisceral synapses.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Remarks from the President Elect - A debate initiating letter to the members of the Society]

PALKÓ András

Hungarian Radiology

[Radiotherapy]

MÓZSA Szabolcs

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Life threatening rare lymphomas presenting as longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis: a diagnostic challenge

TOLVAJ Balázs, HAHN Katalin, NAGY Zsuzsanna, VADVÁRI Árpád, CSOMOR Judit, GELPI Ellen, ILLÉS Zsolt, GARZULY Ferenc

Background and aims – Description of two cases of rare intravascular large B-cell lymphoma and secondary T-cell lymphoma diagnosed postmortem, that manifested clinically as longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM). We discuss causes of diagnostic difficulties, deceptive radiological and histological investigations, and outline diagnostic procedures based on our and previously reported cases. Case reports – Our first case, a 48-year-old female was admitted to the neurological department due to paraparesis. MRI suggested LETM, but the treatments were ineffective. She died after four weeks because of pneumonia and untreatable polyserositis. Pathological examination revealed intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVL). Our second case, a 61-year-old man presented with headache and paraparesis. MRI showed small bitemporal lesions and lesions suggesting LETM. Diagnostic investigations were unsuccessful, including tests for possible lymphoma (CSF flow cytometry and muscle biopsy for suspected IVL). Chest CT showed focal inflammation in a small area of the lung, and adrenal adenoma. Brain biopsy sample from the affected temporal area suggested T-cell mediated lymphocytic (paraneoplastic or viral) meningoencephalitis and excluded diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The symptoms worsened, and the patient died in the sixth week of disease. The pathological examination of the presumed adenoma in the adrenal gland, the pancreatic tail and the lung lesions revealed peripheral T-cell lymphoma, as did the brain and spinal cord lesions. Even at histological examination, the T-cell lymphoma had the misleading appearance of inflammatory condition as did the MRI. Conclusion – Lymphoma can manifest as LETM. In cases of etiologically unclear atypical LETM in patients older than 40 years, a random skin biopsy (with subcutaneous adipose tissue) from the thigh and from the abdomen is strongly recommended as soon as possible. This may detect IVL and provide the possibility of prompt chemotherapy. In case of suspicion of lymphoma, parallel examination of the CSF by flow cytometry is also recommended. If skin biopsy is negative but lymphoma suspicion remains high, biopsy from other sites (bone marrow, lymph nodes or adrenal gland lesion) or from a simultaneously existing cerebral lesion is suggested, to exclude or prove diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, IVL, or a rare T-cell lymphoma.

Clinical Neuroscience

Association of anterior thoracic meningocele and azygos lobe of the lung

DENIZ Ersay Fatih, SENAYLI Atilla, BICAKCI Ünal

Here we report an anterior thoracic meningocele case. Twoyears- old female patient was presented with kyphosis. Azygos lobe of the lung was also demonstrated during radiological studies. Posterolateral thoracotomy incision and extralpeural approach was performed for excision of the anterior meningocele to untether the cord. Although both anomalies are related to faulty embryogenesis and it is well known that faulty embryogenesis may also reveal coexisting abnormalities, we could not speculate a common mechanism for anterior thoracic meningocele and azygos lobe of the lung association.

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[The quality control of radiological equipments in Hungary]

PELLET Sándor, PORUBSZKY Tamás, BALLAY László, GICZI Ferenc, MOTOC Anna Mária, VÁRADI Csaba, TURÁK Olivér, GÁSPÁRDY Géza

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[UNCOMMON MANIFESTATION OF CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM SARCOIDOSIS]

RÓZSA Anikó, SZTANKANINECZ Yvette, GÁCS Gyula, MAGYAR Tamás

[Two cases of uncommon manifestation of central nervous system sarcoidosis are reported. A 42 year-old man had a spinal cord sarcoidosis. MRI of the spinal cord showed myelopathy in the cervico-thoracic region, and the T2-weighted image showed increasing signal intensity. Neurological symptoms did not correllate with radiological abnormalities. Neurological manifestation was paucisymptomatic. Half a year later steroid and azatioprin therapy led to almost complet radiological and clinical regression. In the second case we present a 49 year-old woman who had left side internuclear ophthalmoplegia and the brainstem lesion. The patient was proven to have sarcoidosis. In this case no abnormalities were found in brain MRI. Neurological symptoms could not be detected by MRI, probably caused by brainstem parenchymal lesions consisting of microgranulomatosis that is sarcoid "brainstem encephalitis". Neurological symptoms improved after steroid treatment in this case too. In both of the cases pulmonary lymphadenopathy helped to diagnose sarcoidosis. In our cases there were interesting correllations between neurological symptoms and MRI abnormalities. At the spinal cord sarcoidosis the radiological abnormalities were more striking than the clinical manifestation. In the other case we found distinct brainstem symptoms but could not detect MRI abnormalities.]