Hungarian Radiology

[Breast malignancies: review of the year 2008/2009 radiological diagnostics and therapy news - Onco Update, 2010]

FORRAI Gábor

MAY 15, 2010

Hungarian Radiology - 2010;84(01)

[Systematic review of the recent articles of the years 2008/2009 about breast tumours’ radiological diagnostics and guided therapy, the actual place of the imaging and interventional methods are presented.]

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Hungarian Radiology

[Dr. Beáta Kovács was awarded Lányi-prize in 2009]

GÖBLYÖS Péter

Hungarian Radiology

[Leaping forward - Hungarian Radiology Online has started!]

LOMBAY Béla

Hungarian Radiology

[Farewell to dr. Levente Lukács 1984-2010]

HÜTTL Kálmán

Hungarian Radiology

[Radiological assessment of the combined high tibial osteotomy in the frontal plane]

PAPP Miklós, KÁROLYI Zoltán, FAZEKAS Péter, SZABÓ László, PAPP Levente, RÓDE László

[INTRODUCTION - High tibial osteotomy (HTO) is a generally accepted treatment for medial unicompartmental osteoarthritis of the knee with varus alignment. The main principle of HTO is to achieve a transfer of loading from diseased, arthritic areas of the joint to areas with relatively intact, healthly cartilage. This stress reduction can be achieved with correction of the loading axis. A stress reduction occurs in the medial compartment of the knee when the loading axis is transferred from the medial compartment to just lateral to the center of the joint. PATIENTS AND METHODS - We performed radiological assessment of 52 knees preoperatively and after combined high tibial osteotomy (CO) in the 10th postoperative week, in the 12th postoperative month and in the 5th postoperative year on a standing weight-bearing anteroposterior radiograph. CO involved performing a proximal osteotomy parallel to the tibial plateau, followed by a distal osteotomy extending from the lateral part of the tibia to the line of the proximal osteotomy at the center of the tibial condyle. After closure of the lateral part of the osteotomy and consequent opening of the medial part, the removed lateral bone wedge was transferred to the gap on the medial side. Pre- and postoperatively we measured the lateral angle between the anatomic axis of the femur and the distal articular surface of the femur (FCFS), the lateral angle between the anatomic axis of the tibia and the proximal articular surface of the tibia (TP-TS) and the lateral angle between the distal articular surface of the femur and the proximal articular surface of the tibia (the articular component of the varus deformity FC-TP). We determined the FTA as a sum of FC-FS, TP-TS and FC-TP. RESULTS - The FC-TP, the TP-TS and the FTA decreased significantly after CO according to data measured in the 10th postoperative week. We achieved the planned correction (FTA 171-169°) in 77% of cases. Undercorrection (FTA ≥172°) was detected in 7, overcorrection (FTA ≤168°) was noted in 5 cases. We detected significant loss of correction between the 10th postoperative week and the 12th postoperative month (the FTA increased significantly, the loss of correction was 1° in 26 cases, 2° in 7 cases). The valgus alignment did not increase in any case. The articular component did not change in 36 cases. We did not note significant loss of correction and the valus alignment did not increase in any case between the 12th postoperative month and 5th postoperative year. We noted the recurrence of varus deformity in 1 case. We detected loss of correction due to increasing articular component in further 4 cases. The FC-FS did not change during the first 5 postoperative years. CONCLUSION - If we achieved the planned correction (FTA 171-169°) according to data measured in the 10th postoperative week on a standing weight-bearing anterposterior radiographs, we did not detect recurrence of varus deformity in any case during the first 5 postoperative years. If the articular component (FC-TP) did not change between the 12th postoperativ month and the 5th postoperative year (in 61.5% of cases), in our opinion we achieved the optimal correction.]

Hungarian Radiology

[CALENDAR OF THE HUNGARIAN SOCIETY OF RADIOLOGISTS, 2010]

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[Authors reviewed the recent results of pancreas tumour radiological diagnostics and the place of the imaging and interventional methods. Systematical review of the most recent articles were summarized (July 2003-December 2004) in the following subjects: the etiology and clinico-pathology, general diagnostic and therapeutical questions of early pancreatic neoplasms, abdominal ultrasound, computed tomography, multidetector computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, MR-cholangiopancreatography, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, endoscopic ultrasound, intraductal ultrasound, endoscopic ultrasound-guided cytology, percutaneous biopsy, positron emission tomography, positron emission tomography - computed tomography, special pancreatic tumours. Experiences about the pancreas diagnostic methods are accumulating year-to-year rapidly. Therefore the current examination algorithm is changing continuously. New diagnostic and therapeutic modalities are entering in the daily practice. These are the reasons why the up-to-date knowledge of the literature is mandatory.]

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[Background and purpose - Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is a rare inflammatory demyelinating disorder often preceded by infection or vaccination. The purpose of the study was the systematic analysis of clinical, radiological and microbiological profiles of children treated at Szent László Hospital, and the comparison of findings with literature data. Methods - Demographic, infectological, clinical, radiological, laboratory and virological data of patients treated and followed-up between 1-Jan-1998 and 30-June-2008 were reviewed and analysed. Results - 19 children met diagnostic criteria. Their mean age was 6.8 years. A prodromal illness - mostly febrile viral infection, upper respiratory infection or chickenpox - preceded neurological symptoms in 17 patients. All had polysymptomatic encephalopathy, 2 children had spinal symptoms. The cerebrospinal fluid was abnormal in all but one. A viral etiology was definite in 7 and probable in 8 cases. MRI disclosed white matter changes in 18, cortical and deep gray matter in 16, cerebellar in 6, brain stem in 14 and spinal cord changes in 2 cases. Repeat MRI performed mean 4 months later showed complete resolution in 6 and partial resolution in 11 patients. 13 patients received high-dose methylprednisolone, 2 of whom were also treated with plasma exchange and 1 with immunoglobulin. 9 children required mechanical ventilation. 2 patients died, 10 recovered without and 7 with sequelae. 2 patients developed further demyelinating events: multiple sclerosis and multiphasic disseminated encephalomyelitis, respectively. Conclusion - Clinical, radiological and follow-up results were similar to those published in literature however, triggering viruses were identified in a larger proportion of cases.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency - disease or misdiagnosis?

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Background and purpose - Former studies reported internal jugular vein stenosis in patients with multiple sclerosis. We aimed to evaluate if these venous stenoses were real and cerebral venous outflow of patients with multiple sclerosis differed from that of normal controls. Methods - 20 controls were prospectively investigated by angiography and duplex ultrasound. Seven patients with multiple sclerosis underwent angiography in other centers; we reviewed these registrations and performed venous ultrasound examinations. Results - Angiography displayed >50% stenosis of internal jugular vein in 19 controls (69±17% on the right and 73±13% on the left side) and <50% stenosis in 1 control (43.5% and 44.6%). All 7 patients had at least one-sided stenosis. The mean degree of stenosis was 63±16% on the right and 67±13% on the left side. There was no significant difference in the degree of stenosis between patients and controls. However, these “stenoses” disappeared if the contrast agent was injected at a catheter position below the orifice of the subclavian vein during venography. The venous flow volume was also similar between groups: 479.7±214.1 and 509.8±212.0 ml/min (right and left side) in the patients and 461.3±224.3 and 513.6±352.2 ml/min in the control group; p=0.85 and 0.98 (right and left). Color and power duplex imaging also revealed normal blood flow of the internal jugular vein in all patients and controls. Conclusion - The cerebral venous status of patients with multiple sclerosis and controls were similar. The angiographic “stenoses” were virtual, caused by the contrast dilution effect of the non-contrast blood stream of the subclavian vein.

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[Osteonecrosis of the femoral head associated with pregnancy is a rare condition. Approximately 40-50 cases have been reported, the first one by Pfeifer in 1957. Avascular osteonecrosis is usually caused by factors that impair the bone’s blood supply (intraosseous arterious or venous occlusion, venous stasis, hypertension in the bone marrow). Owing to the cautious use of radiological imaging techniques during pregnancy and the limited experience with this condition, the correct diagnosis is usually made only retrospectively. Thus, total hip replacement is required in most cases. In the third trimester, MRI examination is safe to perform, and in some cases a simple X-ray should be also considered, as timely avoidance of weight-bearing and other therapeutic interventions might help to prevent the arthroplasty. Here, we would like to present a case observed and treated by us, and to overview the options that could facilitate making the correct diagnosis and finding the appropriate therapeutic program.]

Hungarian Radiology

[High resolution sonography for the examination of peripheral nerves]

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[High-frequency sonography is an important method for the imaging of the peripheral nerves, even though it is rarely used. For the examination of superficially located nerves, currently available transducers with frequencies between 12-17 MHz offer a better axial resolution than even MRI. Sonography is superior to MRI especially for the examination of nerves of the upper extremity. Main indications for the sonography of the nerves are entrapment syndromes, traumatic injuries of the nerves, tumors, polyneuropathies and sonographically-guided interventions. The sensitivity of sonography and electrophysiology in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome and cubital tunnel syndrome are comparable. The combination of ultrasonography with electrophysiological studies increases the diagnostic yield in carpal and cubital tunnel syndromes. Sonography provides information for planning of peripheral nerve surgery and is helpful in evaluating postoperative complications. In selected cases, sonography can detect nerve lesions that require operative therapy earlier than electrophysiology. With technical enhancements, highfrequency ultrasonography is gaining increasing importance in the routine diagnostics of peripheral nerves lesions.]