Hungarian Immunology

[Plasmacytoid dendritic cells - type I interferon producing cells]

MAGYARICS Zoltán, RAJNAVÖLGYI Éva

OCTOBER 10, 2005

Hungarian Immunology - 2005;4(03-04)

[Dendritic cells represent a multifunctional cell population classified to myeloid (mDC) and plasmacytoid (pDC) types. Both subsets circulate in the peripheral blood and are found in lymphoid and also in non-lymphoid tissues, where they act as sensors of environmental changes. Upon activation by a wide range of stimuli they undergo morphological and functional transition and give rise to professional antigen presenting cells, which migrate to lymphoid organs. A newly identified precursor subset of human dendritic cells has recently been identified as professional type I interferon producing cells (IPC) with multiple functional activities. With their capacity of priming, instructing and regulating various pathogen- and tumor-specific immune responses, IPC/pDC act as a link between innate and adaptive immunity. The role of pDC in the pathogenesis of various diseases is well established, and these cells also emerge as novel candidates of immunomodulation.]

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