Hungarian Immunology

[PAPER REVIEW]

SZABÓ Zoltán

MARCH 20, 2002

Hungarian Immunology - 2002;1(01)

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Hungarian Immunology

[In memoriam professor Gyula Petrányi]

SZEGEDI Gyula

Hungarian Immunology

[Neonatal activation of interferon-γ in macrophages]

ERDŐS Melinda, MARÓDI László

[Each individual passes through developmental or transient immunodeficiency due to the immaturity of the immune system in early childhood, expecially in the neonatal period. Therefore, neonates contract infections by intracellular and extracellular microorganisms more easily than older children and adults, and develop more severe disease with a high mortality rate. A number of abnormalities in the neonate’s host defense systems have been described suggesting that the immune system at birth functionally differs from that in adults. Neonatal T and B cells show decreased reactivity to antigens and mitogens and have deficienct IgM-IgG isotype switching. Newborns have decreased functional capacities of the hemolytic complement system. Under the same in vitro and in vivo conditions neonatal granulocytes show functional deficiency earlier than adult cells. Effector mechanisms of the cell-mediated immunity involve activation of macrophages by T helper1 cytokines, particularly interferon- γ (IFN-γ). IFN-γ is the most important macrophage-activating cytokine in vivo. Neonatal T cells express lower levels of IFN-γ and macrophages are hyporesponsive to activation by this cytokine. This deficiency may be explained by decreased phosphorilation of STAT1 despite comparable expression of STAT1 protein in neonatal and adult macrophages.]

Hungarian Immunology

[Anti-inflammatory effects of high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin therapy in immunothrombocytopenic purpura]

ERDŐS Melinda, MARÓDI László

Hungarian Immunology

[2nd C1-esterase inhibitor deficiency workshop, April 2001, Budapest]

FARKAS Henriette, VARGA Lilian, HARMAT György, FÜST György

Hungarian Immunology

[Patomechanism of hereditary angioneurotic oedema and provoking factors of oedematous attacks]

FARKAS Henriette

[The author describes the genetic background of hereditary angioneurotic edema, an autosomal dominant disorder. The pathomechanism of edemaformation and the significance of major mediator substances are explained along with clinical manifestations and their management. A special emphasis is placed on prophylaxis, the mainstay of which is the elimination of precipitating factors. The latter include mechanical trauma, diagnostic and therapeutic interventions performed in the cephalic-cervical region, mental stress, and sex hormones. The effect of endocrine therapies, ACE inhibitors, and infections - Helicobacter pylori in particular - on the natural course of the disease is also discussed.]

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