Hungarian Immunology

[Experimental arthritis model]

SZÁNTÓ Sándor, GONDA Andrea, MIKECZ Katalin, GLANT Tibor, SZEKANECZ Zoltán

FEBRUARY 20, 2005

Hungarian Immunology - 2005;4(01)

[Animal models of experimental arthritis can be used to understand pathophysiology of the arthritic processes in patients and provide opportunity to develop new therapeutic approaches. The animal models can be divided into different categories based on the pathomechanism of the model and on the features that resemble human inflammatory joint diseases. This review provides an overview of the most widely used types of experimental arthritis models emphasizing their advantages and limitations in the basic arthritis research.]

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[Immune-dysfunctions in patients with Hodgkin’s lymphoma being in a long lasting complete remission]

ALEKSZA Magdolna, KERESZTES Katalin, BARÁTH Sándor, SIPKA Sándor, ILLÉS Árpád

[OBJECTIVES - Immunosuppression has long been known to be associated with Hodgkin’s lymphoma. The authors report on immunologic abnormalities with special focus on cellular immunity in patients with Hodgkin’s disease in complete remission. METHODS - We determined the proportion of the lymphocytes subpopulations, activated T cells, CD4+/CD25+ suppressor T cell population and intracytoplasmic cytokines by flow cytometry. The soluble cytokines were measured by classical ELISA technique. RESULTS - Based on lymphocyte cell surface antigen expression the subpopulations were as described in the literature, however a unique elevation of CD4+/CD25+ cell fraction was detected. The decreased amount of IFN-γ in the serum suggest Th2 dominance, but reduced intracellular IL-4 production in both CD4+ and CD8+ cells results from Th1 dominance. These results somewhat contrary but can not be completely compared as in vivo and in vitro techniques used for the analysis are not identical. However a constant elevation concentration and expression of IL-10 and TGF-β is observed. CONCLUSION - These alterations may reflect the existence of an immunosuppressive state also in the peripheral blood of Hodgkin’s lymphoma patients not only in the lymph nodes.]

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[History of immunology in Hungary Part VI]

KARASSZON Dénes, CSABA Béla

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GÁL István, CSIKI Zoltán, SZEGEDI László, KISS Gyula

[The two archetypes of inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) have a considerably high prevalence and chronic morbidity, and thereby a striking public health relevance amongst the maladies involving the gastrointestinal tract. Unveiling their pathogenesis can be the key for the development of successful therapeutic approaches. Our view of these diseases has undergone radical changes in the past few years, and the latest discoveries have shed new light upon their pathomechanism. A multifactorial view is appropriate when explaining their pathogenesis, although certain factors are seemingly of particular importance.]

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