Clinical Oncology

[Treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma - an update]

DEMETER Gyula, VÉGH Éva

FEBRUARY 10, 2018

Clinical Oncology - 2018;5(01)

[Last time we have described about the modern treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in „Klinikai Onkológia” in 2014 (1) and a detailed guideline regarding epidemiology, treatment according to BCLC staging system has been published as well in a special edition in this year (2). Here, we discuss mainly the fi rst- and second line systemic treatment of HCC according to our experience and the new results of clinical trials. 203 patients were treated in our Department between 2010 and 2016. These results have been presented already on the MKOT conference in 2016. In this year we have started second line systemic therapy with regorafenib in 9 cases.]

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