Clinical Oncology

[The role of hospice in the management of cancer patients]

TORGYIK Pál

MAY 20, 2016

Clinical Oncology - 2016;3(02)

[There is the relationship between the oncological treatment and hospice care proved by the data on morbidity and mortality. Cancer treatment is just partially effective since besides the growing incidence of new patients (90 091 in 2013) in Hungary, the mortality rate is still high (33 278 people in 2013). Revealing the diagnosis of tumorous disease causes an incredible shock for the patients, therefore oncopsychologists have to join to the oncological treatment at a very early stage. They give psychological support to both the patients and their families. By relieving stress and helping to combat the disease, the patients could accept and gradually face to the new situation. The patient keeps hoping as long as the treatment is effective and his/her health does not begin to decline. Today, in most cases the effi cacy of the treatment is just temporary and the patient will reach the stage where only the palliative and hospice care can help to maintain an acceptable but provisional quality of life. A new movement started for the terminally ill patients to keep their dignity. Hospice is an integral part of health care with 205 beds, and 75 home hospice care units (in Hungary). To get into the hospice care we describe the patients’ path including the terminal state, agony and death. We also explain the palliative medical and psychological care as well as the other forms of care at home and in the domestic or hospital care carried out within a team-work. The activity of these two types of care must be integrated and mutually supported. Finally we are going to talk about the problems that prevent the acceptable operation in this system.]

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Clinical Oncology

[Complications of infusion treatment with emphasis on extravasation of cytostatics]

HARISI Revekka

[The extravasation of cytostatics is the most signifi cant complication of infusion therapy in cancer treatment. Extravasation refers to the inadvertent infi ltration of cytostatic drugs into subcutaneous or subdermal tissues surrounding the intravenous or intraarterial administration site. According to literature data incidence estimates between 0,01-7%. Extravasated drugs are classifi ed according to their potential for causing damage as vesicant, irritant and nonvesicant. Knowledge of risk factors, the patientrelated and treatment-related ones is important to minimize the occurrence of extravasation. In order to reduce the risk of extravasation, the staff involved in the tumor infusion therapy must be specially trained to implement several preventive and therapeutical protocols. In 2012, ESMO-EONS has put together a new comprehensive treatment protocol on the topic of cytostatics extravasation. Protocol recommended that every oncological department, who administers chemotherapy have to have extravasation trained team and a standby extravasation kit. According to the new ESMO-EONS guideline subcutaneous corticoids are not recommended, anymore. In case of mechloretamine extravasation the recommendation is immediate subcutaneous injection of sodium thiosulfate. After extravasation of anthracyclines, mitomycin C and platin salts the best treatment opportunity is subcutan dimethyl sulfoxide administration. In case of anthracyclines’ extravasation intravenous dexrazoxane treatment is also effective. Hyaluronidase, injected into or under the skin, facilitates absorption of extravasated drugs because of increases connective tissue permeability, promotes the spreading and reduces the local concentration of the extravasated citostatic agents. Hyaluronidase might be effi cacious in preventing skin necrosis by extravasation due to vinca alkaloids. The treatment of unresolved tissue necrosis or pain lasting more than 10 days is surgical debridement. Because of the medical and juristic importance of the extravasation event, it is necessary to establish uniform guidelines for treatment of extravasation, in all Hungarian Oncological Centers.]

Clinical Oncology

[Foreword]

A szerkesztők

Clinical Oncology

[News from the World]

Clinical Oncology

[Non-surgical treatment of the biliary tract and gallbladder cancer]

PIKÓ Béla, LACZÓ Ibolya

[Biliary tract cancers are rare, hence only a few high level of evidences related to their treatment are available. The successful treatment and the only chance for long-term survival are based on the radical surgical resection. After the fl uoropyrimidin based protocols chemotherapy regimens prefer gemcitabine combinations (cisplatin, oxaliplatin, capecitabine) or FOLFIRINOX, considering the patient performance status as well. There are no registered targeted therapy in this indication, the most experiences were acquired with erlotinib; nowadays the optimal treatment can be selected by the molecular genetic profi le of the tumour and not by the results of the clinical studies. The radiotherapy and the radiochemotherapy can be administered preoperatively, postoperatively and for palliation as well, in addition to the conventional percutaneous radiotherapy, brachytherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, intraoperative irradiation, radioembolization can also be administered depending on the technical equipments. Besides the photodynamic therapy and several ablation therapies, even interventional radiological procedures can play a signifi cant role.]

Clinical Oncology

[Treatment of childhood tumors of mesenchymal origin]

CSÓKA Monika

[Mesenchymal cells can be differentiated into skeletal muscle, smooth muscle, adipose tissue, fi brous tissue, bone and cartilage. Tumors can be originated from these tissues as benign tumors - fibroma, lipoma, osteoma, chondroma, haemangioma, myoma, etc. or as malignant tumors - in childhood, most commonly rhabdomyosarcomas, osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, less often fi brosarcoma, liposarcoma or other rare types. Clinically, the outcome of these tumors have improved signifi cantly in the last decade due to the use of multi-modality treatment (chemotherapy, surgery, irradiation, in some cases targeted therapy). The better treatment results are based on early diagnosis and adequate management according to international treatment protocols in pediatric oncology centers.]

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