Clinical Neuroscience

[Vécsei-Komoly (eds.): Sclerosis multiplex]

HARCOS Péter

MARCH 10, 2005

Clinical Neuroscience - 2005;58(03-04)

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Primary prevention program of the Hungarian Spine Society - Part I. Scientific background of the posture correction exercise scheme]

GARDI Zsuzsa, FESZTHAMMER Artúrné, DARABOSNÉ Tim Irma, TÓTHNÉ Steinhausz Viktória, SOMHEGYI Annamária, VARGA Péter Pál

[The primary prevention program of the Hungarian Spine Society aims to increase awareness of the need to develop and automatically maintain a biomechanically correct posture for all school children. The biomechanically correct posture is a dynamic balance based on a correct middle position of the pelvis and on muscle balance. In this position three important anatomical points - the left and right anterior superior iliac spines and the upper medial point of the pubic bone - form one frontal plane. From side-view the imaginary weight median of the body crosses the 2nd to 5th lumbar and the 2nd to 5th cervical vertebral bodies. When the muscles involved in posture are in balance, their strength and flexibility are just appropriate for the almost continuous work required against gravity. In case of static and/or dynamic under- or overload tonic muscles become shortened, and phasic muscles become stretched, and are no longer able to work optimally. Since many muscles and muscle parts that are involved in normal posture maintenance are not satisfactorily challenged in regular physical exercises and sport activities, the preventive exercise scheme of the Hungarian Spine Society aimed to involve these rarely used muscles in special strengthening and stretching exercises. The scheme is based on 12 test exercises that assess the strength and flexibility of postural muscles. A person who is able to do all test exercises correctly has no problem with his or her muscle balance. In order to counteract the harm caused by sedentary lifestyle already in childhood, regular use of this posture correction scheme in physical education starting from preschool throughout the school-years is recommended for all children.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Volumetric changes following 125 I interstitial irradiation of low grade gliomas]

JULOW Jenő, VIOLA Árpád, MAJOR Tibor, MANGEL László, BAJZIK Gábor, REPA Imre, SÁGI Sarolta, VALÁLIK István, EMRI Miklós, TRÓN Lajos, NÉMETH György

[Background - Image fusion permits quantitative analysis of the consequences of 125 Iodine interstitial irradiation of brain tumors. The volume of tumor necrosis, reactive zone and edema can be compared to the dosimetric data. Patients and method - Nineteen patients with low grade glioma were analyzed on the average 14.5 months following 125 Iodine interstitial irradiation. Dose planning and image fusion were performed with the Target 1.19 (BrainLab) software. The CT/MR images showing the so called “triple ring” (necrosis, reactive ring and edema) developing after the interstitial irradiation of brain tumors were fused with the planning images and the isodose curves. The volume of the three regions was measured. Values at the intersections of isodose curves and necrosis borders were averaged and used for calculation of tumor necrosis. The volume of normal brain tissue irradiated by given dose values, as well as homogeneity and conformality indices were also determined. Results - The relative volumes of the different parts of the “triple-ring” compared to the reference dose volume were the following: necrosis 54.9%, reactive zone 59.7%, and edema 445.3% . Tumor necrosis developed at 71.9 Gy dose. At the irradiation of an average size glioma with a volume of 12.7 cm3, 5 to 7 cm3 normal brain tissue around the tumor received 60-70 Gy dose. The average homogeneity and conformality indices were 0.24 and 0.57, respectively. Conclusion - The analysis of changes in the volume of edema, reactive ring and necrosis caused by interstitial irradiation, and their correlation with the dozimetric data using the image fusion method provide useful information for patient follow-up, clinical management and further therapeutic decisions.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Alajos Orthmayr]

GERÉBY György

Clinical Neuroscience

[Clinical neurosciences for efficient treatment - 2nd Live Issue of Clinical Neuroscience/ Ideggyógyászati Szemle]

RAJNA Péter

Clinical Neuroscience

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[Sturge Weber type 3 presenting with occipital epileptic seizure: case report ]

SERİNDAĞ Cansu Helin, EREN Fulya, KARAHAN Gökçen Muazzez, GUL Gunay, SELCUK Hakan, KARA Batuhan, SOYSAL Aysun

[Sturge Weber syndrome is the third most common neurocutaneous syndrome after neurofibromatosis and tuberous sclerosis. Three distinct types were identified. Type 3 with leptomeningeal involvement alone is the rarest among other types. The reported case is a 21-years-old female patient without any known chronic disease. She admitted to the emergency department after visual symptoms and headache, followed by generalized tonic clonic seizure. EEG of the patient showed left occipital seizure activity. The contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed left occipital leptomeningeal angioma. Digital substraction angiography (DSA) revealed minimal blushed contrast enhancement on late venous phase and lack of superficial cortical veins. Her focal seizures were under control with levatiracetam and lacosamide treatment. The reported case is unique because of the late onset presentation with focal seizure without mental retardation.]

Clinical Neuroscience

The methylation status of NKCC1 and KCC2 in the patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy

UNAL Yasemin, KARA Murat, GENC Fatma, OZTURK Aslan Dilek, GÖMCELI Bicer Yasemin, KAYNAR Taner, TOSUN Kursad, KUTLU Gülnihal

Purpose - Methylation is a key epigenetic modification of DNA and regarding its impact on epilepsy, it is argued that “DNA methylation may play an important role in seizure susceptibility and maintenance of the disorder”. DNA methylation status of KCC2 (SCL12A5) and NKCC1 (SCL12A2) associated with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy was investigated in our study. Materials and methods - Thirty-eight patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) who were diagnosed by video EEG monitoring and 32 healthy control subjects were included in the study. Twenty-three patients in TLE group were men and the remaining 15 were women. Among them, 27 had unilateral temporal focus (9 with right; 18 with left) and 11 patients had bilateral TLE. We analyzed promoter region methylation status of the KCC2 (SCL12A5) and NKCC1 (SCL12A2) genes in the case and control groups. Gene regions of interest were amplified through PCR and sequencing was accomplished with pyro-sequencing. Results - We found a significant relationship between TLE and methylation on the NKCC1. However, there was no association between TLE and methylation on the KCC2 gene. Also, we found no association between right or left and unilateral or bilateral foci of TLE. There was no relationship between TLE and methylation on the NKCC1and KCC2 genes in terms of mesial temporal sclerosis in cranial MRI, head trauma or febrile convulsions. Conclusion - The methylation of NKCC1 can be a mecha­nism of refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. There are limited findings about DNA methylation in TLE. Therefore, further studies with large sample sizes are necessary.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Family planning in multiple sclerosis: conception, pregnancy, breastfeeding]

RÓZSA Csilla

[Family planning is an exceptionally important question in multiple sclerosis, as women of childbearing age are the ones most often affected. Although it is proven that pregnancy does not worsen the long-term prognosis of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, many patients are still doubtful about having children. This question is further complicated by the fact that patients – and often even doctors – are not sufficiently informed about how the ever-increasing number of available disease-modifying treatments affect pregnancies. Breastfeeding is an even less clear topic. Patients usually look to their neurologists first for answers concerning these matters. It falls to the neurologist to rationally evaluate the risks and benefits of contraception, pregnancy, assisted reproduction, childbirth, breastfeeding and disease modifying treatments, to inform patients about these, and then together come to a decision about the best possible therapeutic approach, taking the patients’ individual family plans into consideration. Here we present a review of relevant literature adhering to international guidelines on the topics of conception, pregnancy and breastfeeding, with a special focus on the applicability of approved disease modifying treatments during pregnancy and breastfeeding. The goal of this article is to provide clinicians involved in the care of MS patients with up-to-date information that they can utilize in their day-to-day clinical practice. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[The role of MRI in measuring the effectivity of disease modifying treatments II]

KINCSES Zsigmond Tamás, TÓTH Eszter, FRICSKA-NAGY Zsanett, FÜVESI Judit, RAJDA Cecília, BENCSIK Krisztina, VÖRÖS Erika, CSOMOR Angéla, PALKÓ András, VÉCSEI László

[The paraclinical examinations, principally the MRI have an increasing significance in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. However, MRI markers also have a prominent role in monitoring of the disease-course and activity, and also in the planning of possible therapeutic changes. In accordance with previously published international guidelines, in this article we propose a protocol for the monitoring the treatment efficacy in multiple sclerosis. This could be the basis of a consensus based guideline to be implemented in Hungary.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Statement of SMBOE OTT - About chronic cerebrospinal insufficiency in multiple sclerosis]