Clinical Neuroscience

[Uremic polyneuropathy - clinical and electrophysiological analysis]

PFUND Zoltán1, CZOPF József1, NAGY Ferenc1

MAY 20, 1997

Clinical Neuroscience - 1997;50(05-06)

[Uremic polyneuropathy is a consequence of chronic renal failure, and is one of the symptoms of the uremic syndrome. Its etiology is not well known, several neurotoxins are presumed as pathogenic factors. Both axonal lesions and demyelinization are involved in the development of neuropathy 66 electrophysiological studies (EMG, ENG) in 57 uremic patients were performed in our department between 1978 and 1988. The correlation between clinical and electrophysiological findings are discussed. Clinical or neurographic and myographic signs of neuropathy were found in 50/57 of the patients. The number of electrophysiological signs changes parallely with the severity of uremic neuropathy. There was significant correlation between the decreased plasma calcium levels, the elevated plasma phosphate levels, and the severity of neuropathy. The electrophysiological symptoms are more frequent in cases of rapidly progressive neuropathy. Peripheral nerve pathophysiology reveals a combination of segmental demyelinization and axonal degeneration.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Pécsi Orvostudományi Egyetem, Neurológiai Klinika

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