Clinical Neuroscience

[Surgically cured resistant epilepsy - caused by hemispherical dysgenesis - Case report]

HEGYI Márta1, SIEGLER Zsuzsa1, BARSI Péter2, RUDAS Gábor2, LENGYEL Zsolt3, SZAKÁLL Szabolcs3, BOGNÁR László4, KOZÁK Lajos Rudolf5, NEUWIRTH Magdolna1, FOGARASI András1

JUNE 02, 2009

Clinical Neuroscience - 2009;62(05-06)

[A part of patients with the therapy resistant epilepsy can be cured by surgical interventions. The more concordant the presurgical evaluation data, the better prognosis the patient has postoperatively. In case of discordant examination data, multimodal evaluation or case-specific decision might be successful. We report on a five-year-old boy with bilateral (left-dominated) cortical dysplasia and therapy resistant epilepsy. The ictal EEG did not help to localize the seizure onset zone, semiology had little lateralization value; however, FDG-PET showed left hemispherial hypermetabolism. The child became almost seizure-free and showed improved development after left-sided hemispherotomy.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Magyar Református Egyház Bethesda Gyermekkórháza, Budapest
  2. Semmelweis Egyetem, Szentágothai János Tudásközpont, MR Kutatóközpont, Budapest
  3. Pozitron Diagnosztika Kft., Budapest
  4. Debreceni Egyetem, Orvos- és Egészségtudományi Centrum, Idegsebészeti Klinika, Debrecen
  5. MR Kutatóközpont, Szentágothai János Tudásközpont, Semmelweis Egyetem, Budapest

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[Diminished pain sensitivity in schizophrenic patients has been reported for more than 50 years, however little is known about the substrate and the basic mechanisms underlying altered pain sensitivity in this disease, therefore, relevant animal models are of decisive importance in the study of psychiatric diseases. The authors report a review consisting of two parts focusing on pain sensitivity changes in patients and in different animal models which proved the eligibility as schizophrenia models and pain sensitivities have also been determined. The second part of this article analyzed the results regarding knock out mice as schizophrenia models. These data proved that several genes have significant role in the pathomechanism of schizophrenia; therefore deficiency in one gene does not produce animals showing all signs of this disease. As regards the pain sensitivity changes, only a few data are available with controversial results. Data originated from complex chronic animal models indicate that they might be more adequate methods for studying the mechanisms of schizophrenia including the pain-sensitivity changes.]

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Interest in the hippocampal formation and its role in navigation and memory arose in the second part of the 20th century, at least in part due to the curious case of Henry G. Molaison, who underwent brain surgery for intractable epilepsy. The temporal association observed between the removal of his entorhinal cortex along with a significant part of hippocampus and the developing severe memory deficit inspired scientists to focus on these regions. The subsequent discovery of the so-called place cells in the hippocampus launched the description of many other functional cell types and neuronal networks throughout the Papez-circuit that has a key role in memory processes and spatial information coding (speed, head direction, border, grid, object-vector etc). Each of these cell types has its own unique characteristics, and together they form the so-called “Brain GPS”. The aim of this short survey is to highlight for practicing neurologists the types of cells and neuronal networks that represent the anatomical substrates and physiological correlates of pathological entities affecting the limbic system, especially in the temporal lobe. For that purpose, we survey early discoveries along with the most relevant neuroscience observations from the recent literature. By this brief survey, we highlight main cell types in the hippocampal formation, and describe their roles in spatial navigation and memory processes. In recent decades, an array of new and functionally unique neuron types has been recognized in the hippocampal formation, but likely more remain to be discovered. For a better understanding of the heterogeneous presentations of neurological disorders affecting this anatomical region, insights into the constantly evolving neuroscience behind may be helpful. The public health consequences of diseases that affect memory and spatial navigation are high, and grow as the population ages, prompting scientist to focus on further exploring this brain region.

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