Clinical Neuroscience

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JULY 10, 2004

Clinical Neuroscience - 2004;57(07-08)

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Clinical Neuroscience

[“From brain - through mind - to society“ XIII. International Semmelweis Symposium]

Clinical Neuroscience

[PhD thesis Asphyxia-induced brain oedema formation in newborn pigs: a particular role for histamine]

KOVÁCS József

Clinical Neuroscience

[Prognosis and classification of hypertensive striatocapsular haemorrhages]

HORNYÁK Csilla, KOVÁCS Tibor, PAJOR Péter, SZIRMAI Imre

[Introduction - Nontraumatic intracerebral haemorrhage accounts for 10 to 15% of all cases of stroke. Patients and method - In our study hypertensive striatocapsular haemorrhages were divided into six types on the basis of arterial territories: posterolateral, lateral, posteromedial, middle, anterior and massive (where the origin of the hemorrhage can not be defined due to the extensive damage of the striatocapsular region) type. We analysed laboratory data, clinical presentations and risk factors as alcoholism, smoking and hypertension of 111 cases. The size of the hematoma, midline shift and severity of ventricular propagation were measured on the acute CT-scan. The effect on the 30-day clinical outcome of these parameters were examined Results and conclusion - According to our results, the most important risk factor of hypertensive intracerebral haemorrhage was chronic alcoholism. Blood cholesterol, triglyceride levels and coagulation status had no effect on the prognosis, but high blood glucose levels Significantly worsen the clinical outcome. In our study, lateral striatocapsular haemorrhage was the most common while middle one was the least common type. The overall mortality is 42%, but differs by the type. The 30-day outcome significantly depends on the type of the haemorrhage, the initial level of consiousness, the size of the haematoma, the severity of ventricular propagation, the midline shift and the blood glucose levels. The clinical outcome proved to be the best in the anterior type, good in the posteromedial and lateral types. The prognosis of the massive type is poor. In our study, the classes and the mortality of the striatocapsular haemorrhages was different from the literature data. The higher mortality in our cohort could be due to the longer follow-up and the severe accompanying diseases of our patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Myasthenia in a patient with sarcoidosis and schizophrenia (in English language)]

RÓZSA Csilla, KIS Gábor, KOMOLY Sámuel

[A 44-year-old male patient was hospitalised with paranoid schizophrenia in 1985. Depot neuroleptic treatment was started which successfully prevented further psychotic relapses for the next ten years. His myasthenia gravis started with bulbar signs in 1997 and the symptoms soon became generalized. The diagnosis of myasthenia gravis was confirmed by electromyography, by positive anticholinesterase test and by the detection of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies in the serum. Mediastinal CT examination showed enlarged hilar lymph nodes on the left but no thymic pathology was observed. Mediastinoscopy was performed and biopsies were obtained from the affected nodes. Histology revealed sarcoidosis. The patient suffered respiratory crisis following the thoracic intervention (in September 1998). Combined oral corticosteroid (64 mg methylprednisolone/e.o.d.) and azathioprine (150 mg/day) treatment regimen was initiated and complete remission took place in both the myasthenic symptoms and the sarcoidosis. The follow-up CT scans showed no mediastinal pathology (January 2000). During steroid treatment a transient psychotic relapse occured which was successfully managed by supplemental haloperidol medication added to his regular depot neuroleptics. The patient currently takes 150 mg/day azathioprine and receives 40 mg/month flupentixol depot im. His physical and mental status are stable and he has been completely symptome free in the last 24 months. The association of myasthenia gravis and sarcoidosis is very rare. To our best knowledge no case has been reported of a patient suffering from myasthenia gravis, sarcoidosis, and schizophrenia at the same time.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Alcohol as a risk factor for hemorrhagic stroke (in English language)]

SAJJAN Daniel, BERECZKI Dániel

[Purpose - Whereas the protective effect of mild-to-moderate alcohol consumption against ischemic stroke has been well recognized, there is conflicting evidence regarding the link between alcohol consumption and hemorrhagic strokes. The aim of the present study is to summarize the results of case-control and cohort studies published on this issue. Methods - Recent epidemiologic articles on the relationship between alcohol consumption and hemorrhagic stroke were identified by Medline searches limited to title words using the following search terms: ”alcohol AND cerebrovascular dis*”, ”alcohol AND stroke”, ”alcohol AND cerebral hemorrhage” and ”alcohol AND hemorrhagic stroke”. Results - Most case-control and cohort studies either repor-ted only on total strokes or on a combined group of hemorr-hagic strokes including intracerebral as well as subarachnoid hemorrhages. There was a consensus among reports that heavy alcohol consumption was associated with a higher risk of hemorrhagic strokes. Controversy remains regarding the effect of mild-to-moderate alcohol consumption: while some studies reported a protective effect, others found a dose-dependent linear relationship between the amount of alcohol consumed and the risk of hemorrhagic stroke. The differential effect of moderate alcohol consumption on hemorrhagic compared to ischemic strokes is mostly attributed to alcohol- and withdrawal- induced sudden elevations of blood pressure, and coagulation disorders. Conclusions - Heavy drinking should be considered as one of the risk factors for hemorrhagic stroke. In contrast to the protective effect of mild-to-moderate alcohol use against ischemic strokes, moderate drinking might result in an increased risk of hemorrhagic strokes.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

Evaluation of anxiety, depression and marital relationships in patients with migraine

DEMIR Fıgen Ulku, BOZKURT Oya

Aim - The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency and characteristics of attacks in patients with migraine, to determine the effects of anxiety or depressive symptoms, and to evaluate the marital relationships of patients with migraine. Method - Thirty patients who were admitted to the neurology outpatient clinic of our hospital between July 2018 and October 2018 and were diagnosed with migraine according to the 2013 International Headache Society (IHS) diagnostic criteria were included in this cross-sectional study. Age, sex, headache frequency and severity, depressive traits, marital satisfaction and anxiety status were examined. We used the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Maudsley Marital Questionnaire (MMQ) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for measuring relevant parameters. Results - The mean severity of migraine pain according to VAS scale was 6.93 ± 1.41 and the mean number of migraine attacks was 4.50 ± 4.24. The mean BDI score of the patients was 12.66 ± 8.98, the mean MMQ-M score was 19.80 ± 12.52, the mean MMQ-S score was 13.20 ± 9.53, the mean STAI-state score was 39.93 ± 10.87 and the mean STAI-trait score was 45.73 ± 8.96. No significant correlation was found between age, number of migraine attacks, migraine duration, migraine headache intensity, and BDI, STAI and MMQ scores (p>0.05). But there was a positive correlation between MMQ-S and scores obtained from the BDI and STAI-state scales (p<0.05). Conclusion - In this study more than half of the migraine patients had mild, moderate or severe depression. A positive correlation was found between sexual dissatisfaction and scale scores of depression and anxiety.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Earlier and more efficiently: the role of deep brain stimulation for parkinson’s disease preserving the working capabilities]

DELI Gabriella, BALÁS István, KOMOLY Sámuel, DÓCZI Tamás, JANSZKY József, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna, NAGY Ferenc, BOSNYÁK Edit, KOVÁCS Norbert

[Background – The recently published “EarlyStim” study demonstrated that deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD) with early fluctuations is superior to the optimal pharmacological treatment in improving the quality of life and motor symptoms, and preserving sociocultural position. Our retrospective investigation aimed to evaluate if DBS therapy was able to preserve the working capabilities of our patients. Methods – We reviewed the data of 39 young (<60 years-old) PD patients who underwent subthalamic DBS implantation at University of Pécs and had at least two years follow-up. Patients were categorized into two groups based on their working capabilities: Patients with active job (“Job+” group, n=15) and retired patients (without active job, “Job-” group, n=24). Severity of motor symptoms (UPDRS part 3), quality of life (EQ-5D) and presence of active job were evaluated one and two years after the operation. Results – As far as the severity of motor symptoms were concerned, similar (approximately 50%) improvement was achieved in both groups. However, the postoperative quality of life was significantly better in the Job+ group. Majority (12/15, 80%) of Job+ group members were able to preserve their job two years after the operation. However, only a minimal portion (1/24, 4.2%) of the Job- group members was able to return to the world of active employees (p<0.01, McNemar test). Conclusion – Although our retrospective study has several limitations, our results fit well with the conclusions of “EarlyStim” study. Both of them suggest that with optimal timing of DBS implantation we may preserve the working capabilities of our patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Account on the scientific meeting of Környey Society in 2010. Part 2.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Scientific conference of Transylvanian Society and Museum]

WENINGER Csaba

Hypertension and nephrology

[On the safety of angiotensin-receptor blockers - A new attack on this drug class]

FARSANG Csaba

[Up until now, angiotensin-receptor blockers have been considered to be the safest cardio-, cerebro-, reno- and vasculoprotective drugs. In a previous metaanalysis, ARBs were accused of increasing the risk of myocardial infarction, but a number of metaanalyses and randomised, controlled trials have disproved this hypothesis. In a recent metaanalysis, ARBs were associated with an increased risk of tumours. The author reviews this issue, discusses the flaws of the above metaanalysis and, on the basis of the most up-to-date data in the literature, expert opinions and official statements (FDA, EMA), concludes that members of this drug class should continue to be used according to their approved indications, which is supported by their cardio-, reno-, cerebro- and vasculoprotective effects demonstrated in a number of appropriate, large-scale clinical studies.]